1. Win a Broadcaster or one of 3 Teles! The annual Supporting Member Giveaway is on. To enter Click Here. To see all the prizes and full details Click Here. To view the thread about the giveaway Click Here.

straightening bowed/twisted lumber?

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by TheOutlaw, Mar 8, 2015.

  1. TheOutlaw

    TheOutlaw Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    363
    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2012
    Location:
    United States
    i mentioned this in another thread somewhere and got a few good responses but cant find that thread to save my life (member of too many forums)


    so the issue is i bought 20bdft each mahogany and ash a year ago and due to improper storage it is all slightly bowed and/or twisted. i have a planer but didnt at the time so i bought the wood s2s at 1.75" so there isnt really any room to plane it down without adding a cap to whatever guitars i build with it. im not totally opposed to planing then putting a maple cap on the guitars since i was planning tele's and lp jr/special builds with it anyway but would rather correct the problem rather than putting a bandaid on it possible.

    i would also like tips on preventing this in the future if possible :oops:
     
  2. String Tree

    String Tree Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    15,969
    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2010
    Location:
    Up North
    Proper Storage trumps all.

    Many times, Wood thinks it is still on the Tree.
     
  3. telechadster

    telechadster Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    263
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2010
    Location:
    Vancouver
    you can try wetting the wood and then stickering it, although when I did this to correct some warped neck blanks it was only slightly successful.

    These guys have good advice on storing and correcting cupped\warped wood:
    http://tonewood.com/luthier-resources/care-of-wood.html
     
  4. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    74
    Posts:
    12,229
    Joined:
    May 1, 2003
    Location:
    Jacksonville, FL
    the good news . . . Vintage teles were as thin as 1 9/16 ... on occasion, check the thicknesses Nacho listed in the Blackguard book, some were almost 1 ⅞ thick too, so you have a little wiggle room..

    Most often wood that hasn't been stored with twists and warpage due to objects sitting on it warps, is because that where it wants to be... straighten it by counter twisting it, and the probability that the warp will return is high....

    Ron Kirn
     
  5. TheOutlaw

    TheOutlaw Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    363
    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2012
    Location:
    United States
    so im assuming your saying just plane it out and roll with it?

    any tips to keep this from happening again? a buddy mentioned i should have painted the end grain and layed on something known flat with bricks at each end and in the middle, is that the usually soloution when storing wood? im planning to order maple soon and dont want to have the same problem.

    im also guessing i should order the biggest chunks i can rather than ordering so close to needed sizes since i have the bandsaw and planer anyway. or would that just make it more prone to tying its self in a knot when i cut it down to size?
     
  6. Elias Graves

    Elias Graves Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,218
    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2010
    Location:
    Oklahoma
    I've never had much luck trying to straighten wood out. When that stuff decides it needs to move, it's gonna do what it wants.
    I'd plane it and put a nice top on it.
     
  7. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    74
    Posts:
    12,229
    Joined:
    May 1, 2003
    Location:
    Jacksonville, FL
    when storing lumber, stack with spacers to permit air flow, the weight of the stack keeps it from warping... painting the ends is to prevent "checking".. that'e when the wood splits because the ends dry faster than the core wood.

    yep, I'd cut it to a rough length, say 20 inches, and see how it goes... and yep, I don;t fool with anything thinner than 2 inches,

    r
     
  8. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    25,844
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2012
    Location:
    Montana
    It is fairly easy to straighten out if it was caused by poor storage, but it will take some time. Wet one side (the worst cupped side) and set (wet side down) on a warm flat concrete surface and weight it down as much as possible all along the top. Repeat every few hours, then sticker it over night. Repeat daily until it is flat and then sticker and see what happens when ambient air humidity is low for a week or two. I've done this on hard and soft woods. You can flip the board over and do the other side to get it even flatter. I learned this from a retired librarian/furniture builder/amateur luthier and it works amazingly well.
     
  9. Mojotron

    Mojotron Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    5,239
    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2008
    Location:
    Seattle
    I've only gotten thinner and shorter (3') pieces to behave - once it gets over 1" I just plane it flat once I'm sure that it is stable WRT moisture content.
     
  10. Bagman67

    Bagman67 Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    159
    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2011
    Location:
    San Jose, CA
    This is good information, thanks. I have a slab of cocobolo that I picked up on the cheapity a couple years back that I will eventually use for a fingerboard. In the interim, it's twisted a tad - when I lay it flat, one corner is about 2 mm off the surface when the other three corners are in contact. It's just thin enough that I'm worried that just passing it over the jointer until it's square and flat will shave it too thin to be useable for the intended purpose. I'll dampen and clamp it between some scrap quartz aggregate countertop chunks before I mean to put it into service.

    'Nother question:

    So Mr. Kirn, apart from shooting to attain vintage-correctitude (not an affliction from which I personally suffer) and have enough lumber to rout cavities deep enough for a pickup and a tremolo system (which I can get behind), is there any other reason for a solid-body electric guitar to be one depth vs. another? I mean, apart from the obvious issue of not wanting to end up looking like Quasimodo after a four-hour set with a 9-pound axe.

    Put another way, what's a minimum blank thickness you would recommend for a string-through guitar with a fixed bridge? I laid my hands on some lovely 15"-wide 8/4 african mahogany at a nice price and had the shop cut me two 20" lengths that will eventually turn into telecasters. How far down can I take it?

    Many thanks in advance.
     
  11. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    15,911
    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Location:
    Loganville, Ga.
    Usually you can't fully correct warping or twisting with a planer, you just end up with warped or twisted boards with parallel sides. To correct the twist you need to joint off the high corners, and work from there.
     
  12. Mgeek

    Mgeek TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    66
    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2012
    Location:
    London
    *slightly OT*

    True, but I see this same principle applied to guitar necks and I think that's occasionally worth a second thought.

    Had a severely twisted neck on a guitar that had been tuned up to tension (13s!) in a damp/hot/cold shed, and that straightened out with a spot of countertwisting. The wood only warped in that case because it had been abused!
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.