Stopping a dog from pulling

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Boubou, Oct 20, 2019.

  1. ben smith

    ben smith Tele-Holic

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    my girlfriend is wonderful with our dogs she trains them amazingly well, you could never meet more well behaved dogs than ours. as for pulling - when the dog pulls both you and the dog stop, tell the dog not to pull and then start walking again and so on and so on, it can take a while but it worked for both my dogs.
     
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  2. Jim622

    Jim622 Friend of Leo's

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    Time, and pay attention to his demeanor. I have a Great Dane. It’s always squirrel and wabbit season. I found if I just pay attention to his demeanor you break him of it. He has tells, when he is going to get distracted, I’ll give him a little tap, stop and stand, choke up, or give him a pat and grasp his collar, and tell him to leave it. Know your dog and when he stars going tunnel vision, distract him from it. He still has his days, but we all do.
     
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  3. MilwMark

    MilwMark Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I believe he later recanted not just as to dogs but also as too wolves. Whoops. The latter may have been done by scientists subsequently though.
     
  4. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    a properly-sized pinch collar

    best trainer I knew always said "it takes a jerk to train a dog"

    and treats
     
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  5. G.Rotten

    G.Rotten Tele-Holic

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    We have 2 rescued street dogs which are both currently around 3 years old. We got them about a year apart from each other.

    Rescue number 1 was a breeze to train. She is part chow, border collie & black lab. Did the DNA test.

    Rescue number 2 is likely border collie & some kind of hound. I can see she wants to make us happy & she's very food oriented but none of the training is sticking. She also pulls like crazy on walks.

    We ended up finding a bra style harness where the leash attaches on the chest area. Now if she pulls it changes her center of gravity and puts her off balance.

    Even the kids can walk her now.
     
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  6. JL_LI

    JL_LI Friend of Leo's

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    L.A.Mike is dead on about this. My Jack Russel, unfortunately now very near the end of her life, tried to bring down a school bus. I was walking her and bent down to clean up after her when a school bus came around the corner. A school bus didn’t belong in Sam’s world. She bolted after it pulling her leash out of my hand and made contact with the back tire. She wasn’t hurt but she was rolled by it. She’s a well trained and well behaved girl but there’s no stopping a Jack from doing what a Jack’s got to do. A Jack can’t distinguish between crickets in the basement, a bird in flight, or a school bus. All threats must be neutralized.
     
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  7. Boubou

    Boubou Doctor of Teleocity Gold Supporter

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    It's on.
    Got a PetSafe harness coming.
    We went for a walk, everytime there was tension on the leash i stopped.
    I think she got the idea but too crazy still to do it properly but i pulled her back until the leash was loose then started walking again. A few times she backed up on her own. Kind of worked when there was a dachsund in front of us.
    And then a little puff ( half the size of my cat came and attacked her) glad she didnt kill him.
    Going to take some work, the harness will be good when we go to new places.
    I just have to do it
     
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  8. Bones

    Bones Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Good, you are on the right path. Smart, motivated dogs can have that energy redirected from what we see as negative behaviors into positive ones. Yuki had tremendous issues when we adopted him and while we have to remain vigilant when in public, he is a much happier and calm dog now.
     
  9. chris m.

    chris m. Poster Extraordinaire

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    When I took my dog to dog training they used the technique WhoaTele prescribed, and I have always been able to use it to teach any dog to heel within about 5 minutes.
    Use a choke collar that is properly put on the dog so you can give a quick jerk but then it slacks again, plus a 6' leash, preferably leather (because it feels much better
    in your hands than nylon). You walk forward. As the dog goes ahead of you, when it gets to the end of its tether you call out "heel", give the leash a "pop" so the
    choke collar momentarily tightens, and do a quick 180 so now you are in the front and the dog is behind you. Now you are walking in the other direction. You do
    the same thing....when the dog gets out ahead of you, you let it get to the end of the leash, say "heel", give the leash a quick pop and turn around again 180.
    You do this a few times and when they hear the word "heel" they immediately start looking to see where you are and slow down. If the dog has a tendency
    to walk outwards from you then you do this training next to a wall so you can use the wall to keep the dog from straying too far outwards, at least when walking
    in one direction.

    All of this talk about sled dogs, Jack Russells, etc. Yes, they are bred for what they do, but they are all working breeds and therefore are also bred to be intelligent
    and to have both the drive and the ability to listen to their masters provided they have proper training. Sled dogs have to stop when the musher wants them to stop or
    the sled dog is useless. I would much rather train any working breed over a show breed. Show breeds have been bred almost exclusively for their looks, with
    intelligence often being left out of the breeding equation.

    The bigger problem I see with breeds selected for extreme endurance such as cattle dogs, border collies,
    sled dogs....is that they are bred to travel upwards of 40 miles a day and so they need prodigious amounts of exercise in order to stay on an even keel. They sell
    these spring-loaded contraptions that you can mount to your bicycle and have your dog run at your side while you ride. I've used bicycles with great success when I've
    had dogs that needed a five mile run just to settle down. This is of course after having trained them well enough so I'm not afraid they're going to crash me-- and
    having good confidence in my bike handling, too.

    When you are walking a dog typically they are going to want to smell bushes, telephone poles, etc. In my experience there can be two walk modes-- one where the dog is
    at attention and is expected to heel very closely at all times. But there can also be an "at ease" mode, where the dog is given more leash, and you stop when the dog
    wants to give something a good sniff. You only call out "heel" if the dog starts to pull, but otherwise you are letting the dog enjoy his walk and somewhat
    letting him dictate the pace. Most dogs can start to understand the difference between "attention" mode and "at ease" mode if you are clear and consistent in how you go about it.
     
  10. chris m.

    chris m. Poster Extraordinaire

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    Thanks for posting that Stonnie Dennis video-- so many fantastic tips there. I think it helps reveal the problem with the "alpha dog" theory of training. The alpha dog theory
    of training suggests that you must dominate your dog. But as Stonnie Dennis shows, a dog will enthusiastically work with you because he wants to, not because you're
    forcing him to. Watch any videos of how police dogs or search and rescue dogs are trained, and these same techniques are used-- lots of positive reinforcement and
    very patient, consistent training done in a smart way. The trainer sets the dog up for success and makes sure the dog's having fun while doing it so that he really wants to do it.
     
  11. boneyguy

    boneyguy Doctor of Teleocity

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    Interesting. After watching the video it's clear that he's not 'withdrawing' the use of the term alpha but is more specifically contextualizing it....he gives two examples where using 'alpha' would be appropriate. One example he gives for appropriate use of 'alpha' is what he refers to as "an artificial assemblage" and so maybe using the term 'alpha' in the context of a human/dog relationship might be valid? I've got no emotional investment in Cesar Milan's career so I'm not trying to defend him here...just trying to reason this out.
     
  12. boneyguy

    boneyguy Doctor of Teleocity

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    Wow! Again, I'm not a dog owner or behaviourist but I've never seen him be cruel or unfriendly in his behaviour to dogs so I'm surprised and mystified by your judgement....and I'm guessing you're not alone in your assessment. I see him gently guiding dogs into new behaviours without force or cruelty. I'd like to learn what it is I wasn't seeing when I've watched his shows.
     
  13. bgmacaw

    bgmacaw Friend of Leo's

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    It's not. Dogs aren't wolves. They have evolved over the centuries to become symbiotic with humans. The are able to recognize human body language unlike any other animal. It isn't an artificial assemblage but a natural role.

    National Geographic has become very proactive in taking down videos that show Milan being abusive towards dogs, primarily him kicking, punching and choking them.
     
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  14. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    I miss my Daisy, pulling me.

    And then she seeming trained for quite a number of years.

    Then, in the end her mind was leaving her, and the training went away. And in that condition, no, the device didn't work. You need a dog that's fully there, or IMO the devices won't work.
     
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  15. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I haven't dreamed of Toto for a while now, but I did the other night. I always pick him up and hold him, then I smell of the hair on his head, then the dream is over. Dreams of Toto last only a very short while. The elaborate dreams I have of missiles landing in open fields all around me go on, and on, and on.
     
  16. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    No missiles for me.

    But I have a gallery of other dystopian "misfires" where the fate of my country, ends up laid to waste some other way.

    I used to hold the pup. Now, I hug my #2 Jimmie Vaughan (white, stock bridge).
     
  17. Octorfunk

    Octorfunk Tele-Meister

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    We got this collar from an infomercial 10yrs ago or so. It has inward-facing points (NOT sharp), which when given a firm yank simulated the "nip" that a mother dog would give one of her puppies on the neck to get them to stop doing something.

    [​IMG]

    Not painful, my dog never yelped or cried when we trained with it, but it definitely got the message across.

    It was so effective, we're not talking about a couple weeks or months of practice. I mean it literally took 10 minutes and a couple trips up & down the driveway before stopped 99% of his pulling. I'm not exaggerating. The idea is to teach them to maintain a certain distance, that no matter how much leash you give them, as soon as they feel the slack start to tighten they preemptively slow down to get back in the safe zone.

    It was weird to watch honestly. We kept our leash at about 8ft or so for a week, and the next thing you know, the dog is walking at a constant 8ft in front of us, with enough slack in the leash that it's dragging the ground.

    Once it got to that point, we ditched the collar for a regular one, and he's never forgotten to maintain slack in the leash.

    It pains me to see people being pulled around the neighborhood by their dogs, getting frustrated, being rougher than they need to be.

    I would also mention that we used this same collar to train him to do the other simple stuff as well (sit, lay down stay, etc.). I'm sure to some people out there it might look a little forceful when you give that collar a good solid yank, but it's quick, not constricting breathing, etc.
     
  18. chris m.

    chris m. Poster Extraordinaire

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    Yes, this is a plastic version of a prong collar. It can work as long as it is coupled with a positive reinforcement, fun atmosphere overall.
     
  19. rolandson

    rolandson Tele-Meister

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    Little Bit, an English Fox hound, came with papers. Papers claiming she was incorruptible. Claiming she should never be outdoors off leash. Head strong would be an improvement. She's a moron. A stubborn moron at that.

    She got sent to college. A 30 day residential treatment program for stubborn idiots. What came back was a loveable, obedient moron. She's still dumb as a stick, but she is responsive to commands.

    This was accomplished by a skilled trainer. Not me.
     
  20. Bones

    Bones Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Generally, the trainer trains the owners that way there's no mystery as to how the dog progresses or regresses.
     
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