Stopping a dog from pulling

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Boubou, Oct 20, 2019.

  1. Boubou

    Boubou Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    60
    Posts:
    11,033
    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2005
    Location:
    Montreal, Quebec
    We went for a hike yesterday with the beast and she was a really bad girl.
    She is a mixed Canadian Inuit Dod, which were bred/culled for 4000 years to pull, so yeah she got it in her genes.
    Took a class with her, first class I had blisters on my hands and was dripping with sweat ( and I have had 6 huskies and a mutt before her) she is something else. Anyways, we finished first in class, but that was indoors. But her genes make her pull, when we go for a walk in our neighbourhood she knows where she is going , it’s manageable and the walk is for her, so whatever she wants to do.
    It’s our third hike this fatal, the first 2 she were ok, pulling but a steady manageable pull, yesterday she was crazy.
    I might try again the liver treats and her semi choke flat collar to discipline her a bit, but I doubt she will ever be a “heeler “ which is fine by me.
    Anyways, I know I will get all the suggestions ranging from not going out to using a cattle prod, but I am thinking about harnesses , like those where the buckle to clip the dog is on the side so when the dog pulls he is turned towards you. Do these work? I have tried a “halter” before on another dog and was not impressed.
    Any suggestions?
     
    ben smith and Toto'sDad like this.
  2. Wallaby

    Wallaby Tele-Meister

    Age:
    55
    Posts:
    273
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2018
    Location:
    Midwest
    This might work - https://www.petsafe.net/gentleleader

    My two Rhodesian boys both pulled like crazy, and it took a HUGE amount of walk training ( using liver treats, hot dog slices, etc. ) to get them to learn to heel. Being hounds ( and me a lazy trainer ), they were never really great at it, but they did learn about their own pulling and that I didn't like it.

    If training hadn't worked, I was ready to use the Gentle Leader, but really wanted them to learn.

    I think your intention to avoid negative training methods is really great, good for you, that's not how you treat your friends and I'm glad.

    Good luck.
     
  3. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    24,041
    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2010
    Location:
    Osaka, Japan
    Get a sled!
     
    Skydog1010, Pualee, DonM and 4 others like this.
  4. EsquireBoy

    EsquireBoy Tele-Holic

    Age:
    39
    Posts:
    541
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2019
    Location:
    Paris, France
    With young dogs, I used to stop each time they started to pull. It ended up working, but it took months and was really frustrating.
     
    AAT65, MDent77, Wallaby and 1 other person like this.
  5. DLReed

    DLReed TDPRI Member

    Age:
    35
    Posts:
    52
    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2019
    Location:
    New York
    It works to stop when they pull and have them sit until they have calmed down.You may only get three steps until they start to pull again though. haha, it is a long process. Although, I have a pit bull who is 13 and he still pulls while on a leash. I have used the same training techniques with him as my other dogs and it has never worked. The dog in my picture required almost no training and it just seemed natural for him to walk with me instead of against me.
     
  6. MilwMark

    MilwMark Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    10,332
    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2013
    Location:
    near Arnold's
    We adopted a dog at about 1.5 years who had been a stray for at least 6 months, they guessed.

    Really smart. Really headstrong. Bred to be independent workers (Aussie/Border Collie mix).

    We tried @EsquireBoy's method for MONTHS. Along with reward training. For most dogs I think the works. But after a year we could MAYBE get around the block in 30 minutes. Maybe.

    The Gentle Leader @Wallaby points out was a godsend. Now we can walk wherever, whenever. It's fun. People sometimes think it's a muzzle, but so be it. If they looked and noticed his mouth open, they might not think that, but whatever.
     
    Flakey and Wallaby like this.
  7. Boubou

    Boubou Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    60
    Posts:
    11,033
    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2005
    Location:
    Montreal, Quebec
    I have 2, waiting for the snow

    I guess I am lazy, before we leave she has learned that we dont go out until she sits so i can clip her leash, no need to say anything.
    I have tried the gentle leader (with another dog) ,was not impressed, might
    be worth another try
    She will behave with a choke collar but its not the ideal solution.
    needs work, the lazy bum needs to work that beatch
     
  8. Bones

    Bones Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    21,771
    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2005
    Location:
    Luddite Island, NY
    Training harness with a chest ring along with you stopping dead in your tracks until she heels. Once they learn that the only way forward is at your side, they will get with the program.
     
  9. ce24

    ce24 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    5,440
    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
    Idahoastan
    Cesar Milan would be your friend. You need to establish dominance of your pack of 2. Dogs are pack animals you need to establish alpha status.
     
    Skydog1010, wtk0315 and bullfrogblues like this.
  10. Boubou

    Boubou Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    60
    Posts:
    11,033
    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2005
    Location:
    Montreal, Quebec
    Any example of these harnesses?
    And yes, thats how the clipping the leash before we go out works. Told her to sit, once, then i wait, she wants to go out, thats her reward, the only way to get it is to sit. I dont even need to tell her now, i just wait.
    Now would be a good time for me to train her, not too hoot, not too cold.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2019
  11. OldDave

    OldDave TDPRI Member

    Age:
    65
    Posts:
    23
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2019
    Location:
    North Carolina
    I just began the process of learning to train mine with the same problem. Mine is a hound versus yours which is a sled dog but their DNA traits have to be considered. Most dogs were bred for a purpose, yours is pulling and mine is to hunt. Hounds are let loose to track down the intended game and then howl to let their owners people know they found something. So being held back is contrary to what they feel their job is. Yours is to pull and drag stuff. My trainer feels any restraint around the neck is counter intuitive to the dog and makes them want to pull even harder to be able to do their thing. Her philosophy is that pulling dogs need to have a good reason to come back to you and thereby stop pulling. My dog never really acknowledges I am on the walk. We started in the backyard (fenced) let him run free, then call him with your hand down and a treat in it. To my surprise, given that I wasn't even sure he knew his name when we were on walks, it worked. There are a few other variations to the "game" but all based on give your dog a good reason to come back to you. Gradually we will work up to having him in an environment with more distractions.

    I am using a Freedom No Pull harness. People have unrealistic expectations as to what a harness will do. They do not keep a dog from pulling BUT they give people an easier way to manage it. There are of course other methods. Another member suggested the Gentleleader. Below is the knock on those (to which my trainer concurs as one of the worse methods)

    https://www.nitrocanine.com/blog/2015/02/10/the-head-halter-torture-pain-and-nonsense-explained/

    And then there are E collars. Without argument they are a much faster method but they are learning the behavior from a punished based thought instead of a much more positive response. I have no desire to train my dog that way and would let him be what he is if that was the only alternative. If my wife could run enough voltage through me every time I got GAS I would likely have fewer guitars.

    I volunteer at an animal shelter as a dog walker. I could handle a Mastiff that weighed nearly as much as me and I had an 80ish pound Husky that drug me along like a small child so I feel for you. Good luck and it will take time depending on the method you use.
     
    graybeard65 likes this.
  12. mkdaws32

    mkdaws32 Tele-Meister Ad Free Member

    Age:
    50
    Posts:
    494
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2019
    Location:
    Moncton, NB Canada
    Leave the dog home ;) (cat person here) Lol!

    Seriously, just patience and positive reinforcement. After 2 years my long hair Daschund walks beside me all the way through our nature park with no leash. Sometime I let him have some latitude to sniff around and run through the woods if there are no others around, but he’ll come back as soon as I call. He’ll walk right by other dogs without even looking sideways. Can’t really take credit - mostly his temperament and just being consistent.
     
  13. MilwMark

    MilwMark Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    10,332
    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2013
    Location:
    near Arnold's
    how can this still get repeated, even after it had been thoroughly discredited, including by the guy who invented it?
     
  14. chris m.

    chris m. Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,840
    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2003
    Location:
    Santa Barbara, California
    We used a prong collar on our lab/Rotweiller mix. It got his attention very quickly but wasn’t cruel, in my opinion. If he pulled too hard it would hurt and so he immediately stopped pulling too hard and it didn’t hurt ever again.

    Yes, technically it’s negative reinforcement but all of us have learned that way in our lives. Touch a hot soldering iron once. Hammer your finger once. Cut your finger while dicing vegetables once. Ok, maybe more than once for the clumsy among us, but you get my point. Haltie worked, too, but the wet nylon against his jowls would trigger sores developing at the contact points.
     
    colnago and mkdaws32 like this.
  15. imwjl

    imwjl Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    7,623
    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2007
    Location:
    My mom's basement.
    Some dogs are just wired where knowledgable training and methods will not work so well. Prey instinct is one characteristic hard to tame. Even working breeds can be a challenge where they're not all wired to please the pack leaders the way retrievers usually are.
     
  16. mkdaws32

    mkdaws32 Tele-Meister Ad Free Member

    Age:
    50
    Posts:
    494
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2019
    Location:
    Moncton, NB Canada
    @chris m. I must be a much slower learner than my dog - how many times have I stabbed myself with a screwdriver, burned myself on a soldering iron, hammered my finger? Guess I don’t learn ;)
     
  17. bgmacaw

    bgmacaw Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,827
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2006
    Location:
    Near Athens GA USA
    My two favorite YouTube dog trainers on this topic.



     
  18. L.A. Mike

    L.A. Mike Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,137
    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2014
    Location:
    somewhere over a rainbow (Ex-L.A. resident)
    You have a strong willed breed of dog and it is doing what it was bred to do. Training will help but the dog will always be an Alpha dog based on what you have described. That means it may mind you and walk properly when it is just the 2 of you, but add a distraction like another dog or stranger, and the dog goes into automatic instinctual behavior. That means it must dominate the new animal or person that has entered the equation.
    I had a Chesapeake Bay Retriever that did this. We had a trainer work with her and I was very disciplined when walking her. I constantly maintained control and she obeyed. But when a distraction came along, she went into Alpha mode and no longer paid attention to me or to the different types of collars I tried.
    The solution was a no-pull harness. I went to a local Pet Smart and told them the problem and they let me try different harnesses on her until I found one I liked and that controlled her. It took an hour or two. We walked around the store to encounter other people and dogs and even went into the parking lot. I picked the one that was a good fit, easy to take on and off and worked best.
    That is my recommendation. A trainer will help, but won't actually solve the problem. They will tell you they can in order to get the job and your money. But remember, this is a dog. They can't be reasoned with.
     
    JL_LI likes this.
  19. DrPepper

    DrPepper Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    60
    Posts:
    1,724
    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2017
    Location:
    Texas
    Don't fight it, get a gocart without a motor and enjoy the ride...
     
    Skydog1010 and Zepfan like this.
  20. ce24

    ce24 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    5,440
    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
    Idahoastan
    Mainly because it has worked for me. That's why! I do not use abusive tactics. You can assert dominance in a kindly non violent fashion. Pecking order is established in all species.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2019
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.