Still 335 Dreaming. And Am Wondering . . . . .

ChicknPickn

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Go with the Epi. Buy or rent. The sound won't be the same, but you'll see what you'd be getting into.

I've had a 335 and a 345, both Gibsons. Pretty, if you're into bling, but I didn't like 'em:

- Just too big. Teles and Strats are more compact. I don't like wearing a Cadillac.

- Too many knobs. Some people disconnect two and rewire them as a two-knob instrument. I'm too lazy.

- No single-coil sparkle, twang, or growl. Not enough expression. At least not the expression I shoot for.

- Too balanced-sounding. The low and high strings sound much more like each other than they do with a Tele or a Strat. With a Tele or Strat, playing the same riff or chords on different strings sounds different, which I like.

It was disappointing, because so many artists I love play or played 'em — B.B., Weir, Luther Alison, Elvin Bishop.
So, I've decided to go this ^^^^^ way, pretty much, and for some of the reasons you've mentioned. There perhaps will be some sighs of disappointment out there, but I am going to try living for a little while with . . . . . wait for it . . . . an EART 335.

I know, I know. It can't even dream of being a Gibson guitar. But for a little under $400, I will use this to see whether the general layout of controls, the body size, the humbucking sound are for me. Why the EART? I looked around for reviews and videos until I found people who convinced me they weren't on the EART payroll. It's amazing how many people appear to be. They use the same phrases and even do their spiels pretty much as if they were reading a script from EART. And I suspect they are. But you can find some people who speak our language convincingly, and several have said the neck on the EART 335 is a thing of wonder - - for the money.

Now, I suspect I'll go ahead and play some real Gibsons despite having the EART. If I really don't care for the general feel of the 335 knockoff, I'll give it to a local school. I've done this with other mothballed instruments.

The "real" reviews are identifiable because the writers/hosts talk about what they had to do to get the best setup out of the EART, and what things were underwhelming in the build quality.

Anyway, I'll find out starting this Friday, when my EART is scheduled to arrive. Hopefully, UPS will not have turned it into imported kindling.
 

Ironwolf

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My ES-335s. One is an Epiphone Pro, the other is the genuine article. The Epiphone is an excellent guitar in its own right, but, there is no comparison with the Gibson.

ES-335_pro_small.jpg


ES-335 in case small.JPG
 

Ironwolf

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Most notable differences, aside from finish?

To start with, the Gibson just feels better. You can tell the difference in quality with your eyes closed. The tonality of the guitars is quite different. Even without being plugged in the Epiphone just doesn't have as pleasant a sound. It is lacking in the resonance that can be heard and felt in the Gibson. A difference in the woods? Different construction? A case of attention to detail? I don't know. Probably a combination of all of the above. Plugged in, the Epiphone sounds somewhat ballsier, and somewhat harsher as well. The Gibson's pickups are mellower and more reminiscent of the PAFs from the old days.

If I was playing only Punk or really driven Rock, the Epi would serve very well. But my preference for softer, jazzier, "purer" early R&R and blues inspired pop, makes the Gibson the clear winner by all measures.
 

dreamingtele

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To start with, the Gibson just feels better. You can tell the difference in quality with your eyes closed. The tonality of the guitars is quite different. Even without being plugged in the Epiphone just doesn't have as pleasant a sound. It is lacking in the resonance that can be heard and felt in the Gibson. A difference in the woods? Different construction? A case of attention to detail? I don't know. Probably a combination of all of the above. Plugged in, the Epiphone sounds somewhat ballsier, and somewhat harsher as well. The Gibson's pickups are mellower and more reminiscent of the PAFs from the old days.

If I was playing only Punk or really driven Rock, the Epi would serve very well. But my preference for softer, jazzier, "purer" early R&R and blues inspired pop, makes the Gibson the clear winner by all measures.

This!

I'm repeating myself in this thread, but like I said, the materials used by USA models are still better, so I feel like it's contributing to the premium feel of the USA models. it just certainly feels better, handles better, and the quality is there - but then again, Gibsons are also hit/miss on QC.

Good thing is, I'm not into alternatives nowadays.. during the recent years and global situations we all have been in, life's too short and Id just rather get the "real" deal or the best I can afford. If I'm spending money, I'll make sure it's worth spending. I dont like paying twice now, and it's whats stopping me from getting the IBG.. here in Australia, it's around 1279 (830 USD) (figured model).. that's already almost a third of what a used standard model 335 would cost here which is around 4500 AUD (3000 USD).. given that I've mostly saved my money and waited patiently for all my gear purchases, Id just rather wait a little bit longer and get the Gibson.

when I demo'ed an IBG Epiphone, it is still a very solid product for the price. Bones are good, but if I ever get one, I need it to be very different than my CS '61 in terms of tone and feel to warrant a place in my arsenal, something probably the Gibson cannot do, and there's like a thin gray line there that the IBG 335 can operate, maybe a change to like filtertrons instead of PAF? I dont know, but it can be a good back up, but then again, I'm also not into back ups, if, tonally, it can add something to my arsenal, I'd get it as another guitar that can do it's thing and not just back up.

another good thing is, these 335's are so different to each other, that every 335 model out there doesnt sound the same as the previous one! LOL but I like them light (less than 8lbs) as Ive found that they have a bit more lively response and notes seem to jump out when they're lighter.. but thats just me..
 

Greenmachine

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Secret dream: If my band ever "makes it" I'm going to commission a small boutique luthier to build me a 335 with a bigsby. Oh yeah.
 

dreamingtele

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Secret dream: If my band ever "makes it" I'm going to commission a small boutique luthier to build me a 335 with a bigsby. Oh yeah.

Josh William's mockingbird is very nice..

Collings i-35 is GREAT - however they deviated from the original formula of 16" lower bout and went with a more focused sound and attack with a 15" lower bout - so they're 1-inch smaller from original spec 335..
 

Jared Purdy

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So, I've decided to go this ^^^^^ way, pretty much, and for some of the reasons you've mentioned. There perhaps will be some sighs of disappointment out there, but I am going to try living for a little while with . . . . . wait for it . . . . an EART 335.

I know, I know. It can't even dream of being a Gibson guitar. But for a little under $400, I will use this to see whether the general layout of controls, the body size, the humbucking sound are for me. Why the EART? I looked around for reviews and videos until I found people who convinced me they weren't on the EART payroll. It's amazing how many people appear to be. They use the same phrases and even do their spiels pretty much as if they were reading a script from EART. And I suspect they are. But you can find some people who speak our language convincingly, and several have said the neck on the EART 335 is a thing of wonder - - for the money.

Now, I suspect I'll go ahead and play some real Gibsons despite having the EART. If I really don't care for the general feel of the 335 knockoff, I'll give it to a local school. I've done this with other mothballed instruments.

The "real" reviews are identifiable because the writers/hosts talk about what they had to do to get the best setup out of the EART, and what things were underwhelming in the build quality.

Anyway, I'll find out starting this Friday, when my EART is scheduled to arrive. Hopefully, UPS will not have turned it into imported kindling.
I think it was this thread that got me thinking about getting one, which wasn't the first time I've entertained the idea. The last time was a few years ago. Yesterday I had the chance to try two Gibson ES 335's on opposite ends of the spectrum. One was a basic, "60's" DOT, USA, non-figured top with the T Type PUs, with a sunburst finish. It was around $4500CDN. The other was a Custom Shop 64' Murphy Lab "lightly aged" in the classic red wine colour. It was around $8500CDN. Both were played through a 65' Deluxe Reverb.

I tried the basic model first as I hadn't seen the CS model when I first walked into the store. The basic model did nothing for me. I didn't like the feel of the neck at all and the tone from the PUs was a dud. My bias likely stems from the fact that I have a 2019, 60th Anniversary Custom Shop R9 which is a thing of pure beauty and glory in every way. The DOT ES 335 felt like a total dud. It also felt cheap. The size thing, as one poster alluded to, was also noticeable. I was having a hard time fathoming $4500 for it.

When I returned it to it's rightful place on the wall I spotted the Custom Shop, Murphy Aged specimen behind the counter. A sales person handed in over to me and I immediately noticed the difference in the feel of the neck and the weight: it was much lighter - not that weight is an issue for me. I was not impressed with the aging though. As an aside, I have no idea why people pay what they pay for a beat up guitar that looks like it's been left outside for years. To call that ES 335 "lightly aged" is a real stretch. The gloss finish was now completely matt, way beyond VOS, which is what the finish is on my CS R9. And to boot, the entire guitar, front, sides, back and neck was covered in finish cracks. If felt uncomfortable running your hand over it, like it was dry, aged and cracked.

Plugging it in certainly highlighted the difference in tone with those Custom Burstbucker Alnico III PU''s compared to the T Type PUs in the basic DOT model. That was the highlight, and it was where I could see the allure of the tone from it. It's similar to an LP but different too in that it's more open, not as immediate, "woody", if that means anything. However, the aging, the size of it compared to my LP and my Strat and the cost was a real turn off, and I'm not inclined to the red wine colour either.

There are few offerings in Toronto right now. When I spoke to the sales staff about the lack of stock he said that Gibson even told them that they couldn't give them a ETA on shipments. This was at a Long & McQuade location, the largest, national chain in Canada and the main Canadian distributor for Gibson. The other big stores also have nothing but pictures up on their web sites.

I'd be interested in checking out a 59' Custom Shop, VOS finish in sunburst. Those appear to be around $7700CDN, but there are none available right now. That's fine, as I'm not jonesing anymore. The size thing is an issue, and with my R9, the bar has been set very high. I don't need another pretty guitar just to say I have it and I have to ask myself how much it would actually get played with my CS Strat and my CS R9 in the lead??
 
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imwjl

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Josh William's mockingbird is very nice..

Collings i-35 is GREAT - however they deviated from the original formula of 16" lower bout and went with a more focused sound and attack with a 15" lower bout - so they're 1-inch smaller from original spec 335..
Collings still makes the 16" SoCo series. I believe I stated earlier how at the time it was more than price competitive with Gibsons and a superior instrument. I don't know about current Collings vs Gibson prices but understand the build quality is amazing.


My early model had Bill Collings' hands on and he replied he didn't think it should have a pick guard that I see is an option now. When I got it at Dave's it was played against new Gibsons and one of Dave's real deal originals. By tone it was more a Gibson 335 than the then (10 years ago) new offerings.

While not exactly 335 shaped, it has been a true GAS killer. The sum-total of the build, sound and feel have stopped wanting anything else for about 10 years now so the price might have been a bargain.

It sounds a whole lot like their I-35 and 15" SoCo models but individual strings have what I'll call some extra bigness. To me a noticeably superior guitar for clean tones or when the amount of pick or pluck can be clean or some dirt in the tone. The downside against the 15 inch models would be like a 335 where it is more to handle. Still, it is light against most of the Gibsons I handled.

It is probably an issue for someone obsessed with Gibson brand or 335 shape but is just a fantastic instrument. It struck something emotional and check book irrational when I got it and still does a decade later.

g1wUkOO.jpg
 

ChicknPickn

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Collings still makes the 16" SoCo series. I believe I stated earlier how at the time it was more than price competitive with Gibsons and a superior instrument. I don't know about current Collings vs Gibson prices but understand the build quality is amazing.


My early model had Bill Collings' hands on and he replied he didn't think it should have a pick guard that I see is an option now. When I got it at Dave's it was played against new Gibsons and one of Dave's real deal originals. By tone it was more a Gibson 335 than the then (10 years ago) new offerings.

While not exactly 335 shaped, it has been a true GAS killer. The sum-total of the build, sound and feel have stopped wanting anything else for about 10 years now so the price might have been a bargain.

It sounds a whole lot like their I-35 and 15" SoCo models but individual strings have what I'll call some extra bigness. To me a noticeably superior guitar for clean tones or when the amount of pick or pluck can be clean or some dirt in the tone. The downside against the 15 inch models would be like a 335 where it is more to handle. Still, it is light against most of the Gibsons I handled.

It is probably an issue for someone obsessed with Gibson brand or 335 shape but is just a fantastic instrument. It struck something emotional and check book irrational when I got it and still does a decade later.

g1wUkOO.jpg
Extraordinarily lovely piece.
 

dreamingtele

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Collings still makes the 16" SoCo series. I believe I stated earlier how at the time it was more than price competitive with Gibsons and a superior instrument. I don't know about current Collings vs Gibson prices but understand the build quality is amazing.


My early model had Bill Collings' hands on and he replied he didn't think it should have a pick guard that I see is an option now. When I got it at Dave's it was played against new Gibsons and one of Dave's real deal originals. By tone it was more a Gibson 335 than the then (10 years ago) new offerings.

While not exactly 335 shaped, it has been a true GAS killer. The sum-total of the build, sound and feel have stopped wanting anything else for about 10 years now so the price might have been a bargain.

It sounds a whole lot like their I-35 and 15" SoCo models but individual strings have what I'll call some extra bigness. To me a noticeably superior guitar for clean tones or when the amount of pick or pluck can be clean or some dirt in the tone. The downside against the 15 inch models would be like a 335 where it is more to handle. Still, it is light against most of the Gibsons I handled.

It is probably an issue for someone obsessed with Gibson brand or 335 shape but is just a fantastic instrument. It struck something emotional and check book irrational when I got it and still does a decade later.

g1wUkOO.jpg

Hi sir, Yes I know this.. I just suggested the i-35 as its the most appropriate shape for this thread..

in fact the Soco16 is the exact model I want, if there was one available here in Australia, I wouldve gone for it instead of the CS 61 ES-335 I have..

I actually like the shape.. kind of a twist to an ES125/225, with centerblock and semi hollow.. I actually want one in black/dog hair, bound freboard, and parallelogram inlays.. These are far superior than Gibsons, however sound a bit different..

when I was buying a 330, I did have a chance to try an i-30.. it was every bit superior to the 330, but I wanted a 16" bout and for a shallow reason, I want a true 330, dimension (set at 16th fret), 16" lower bout, mickey mouse ears, etc etc etc you get the gist. if Collings offered that, there's no question Id go for it.
 

Jared Purdy

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Collings still makes the 16" SoCo series. I believe I stated earlier how at the time it was more than price competitive with Gibsons and a superior instrument. I don't know about current Collings vs Gibson prices but understand the build quality is amazing.


My early model had Bill Collings' hands on and he replied he didn't think it should have a pick guard that I see is an option now. When I got it at Dave's it was played against new Gibsons and one of Dave's real deal originals. By tone it was more a Gibson 335 than the then (10 years ago) new offerings.

While not exactly 335 shaped, it has been a true GAS killer. The sum-total of the build, sound and feel have stopped wanting anything else for about 10 years now so the price might have been a bargain.

It sounds a whole lot like their I-35 and 15" SoCo models but individual strings have what I'll call some extra bigness. To me a noticeably superior guitar for clean tones or when the amount of pick or pluck can be clean or some dirt in the tone. The downside against the 15 inch models would be like a 335 where it is more to handle. Still, it is light against most of the Gibsons I handled.

It is probably an issue for someone obsessed with Gibson brand or 335 shape but is just a fantastic instrument. It struck something emotional and check book irrational when I got it and still does a decade later.

g1wUkOO.jpg
This got my attention. Problem is, none are available right now.
 

imwjl

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Extraordinarily lovely piece.
Thank you.
This got my attention. Problem is, none are available right now.
In the recent shopping with one of my kids the guitar store associate said he got a late model Collings that is similar, and the extraordinary quality remains. He said their Gibsons are not so obviously with frequent craptacular build as they were some years ago but each Collings is still "wow" when they arrive.

There's a little smile for me because Bill Collings himself said he didn't think my guitar needed a pick guard nor should it have one but it is an option now. Overall it was doubly satisfying for the shop person to say Gibson's have improved but it remains none of many fine brands are consistently fantastic as the Collings.

I looked at a bunch of stuff with my son's recent shopping. It left me feeling good and lucky I got an amazing acoustic and electric in the 10 or more years ago time. Maybe you'll gave same GAS killing experience as I did if you do it.
 

jvin248

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.

Good to hear you went for the EART model.

If for some reason you don't like the playability then take it to a good guitar tech for a fret level and deep setup and it will play like a Custom Shop. Gibsons are PLEK'd at the end of production to get their playability and cover up any inconsistencies.

If for some reason the tone is not what you want you can always swap in Gibson pickups and Gibson control parts. The pots and caps measured values are important. Funny thing is, many Gibson pickups are available since manyibson buyers swap them out -- secret is they really bought the Gibson for the headstock brand vanity. They talk about tone, but it's vanity.

.
 

Cleantone

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For one, when you know what you want but go for something else you may always have the nagging thought of "what if...". In that sense I suggest going for it. However, my specific experience tells me Gibson isn't the ultimate dream when compared to other options on the market. I bought an Inspired by Gibson EPI 335 from Guitar Center and spent a couple hours at the store switching between it and a Gibson that listed at $3500. There were definitely some differences in finish and tone but not worth 7x the cost, given that upgrades and setup will get me 85%-90% there still at a fraction of the Gibson. For me, assuming I had the budget for that full amount, the flip side of the nagging "what if" would be "I could have taken the 85% solution and also gotten (amps/pedals/lessons from a guitar idol, etc.) for the same cost".

If I could go whole hog, I'd either look for a vintage piece, Gibson Custom Shop, or another company like Collings, Heritage, etc. That may push you into a new price level though, so used instruments may be the way to go.
 

Jared Purdy

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Thank you.

In the recent shopping with one of my kids the guitar store associate said he got a late model Collings that is similar, and the extraordinary quality remains. He said their Gibsons are not so obviously with frequent craptacular build as they were some years ago but each Collings is still "wow" when they arrive.

There's a little smile for me because Bill Collings himself said he didn't think my guitar needed a pick guard nor should it have one but it is an option now. Overall it was doubly satisfying for the shop person to say Gibson's have improved but it remains none of many fine brands are consistently fantastic as the Collings.

I looked at a bunch of stuff with my son's recent shopping. It left me feeling good and lucky I got an amazing acoustic and electric in the 10 or more years ago time. Maybe you'll gave same GAS killing experience as I did if you do it.
From the looks of things right now, it could be a while before I see one. They certainly look nice, and at one time, a local shop, which looks to be the only one in Toronto, the Twelfth Fret, had a lot of them. They currently only have one, and it's not one that I'd be interested in. Even Rudy's in NYC doesn't have any.

In the meantime, I have what I would consider to be a top tier, Custom Shop R9 that I bought in 2019. I spoke with Mark Bishop, the owner of Mark's Guitar Loft in New Hampshire before I bought it. He's probably one of the leading experts on Gibsons, particularly Les Pauls, in the world. He said that with respect to the historic reissues, Gibson started doing it right around 2013 and in 2019 they made what is considered to be the most accurate Les Pauls, with exceedingly high build quality - ever. I'd have to agree. While not all of them have incredible flame tops, the overall build quality is exemplary. I would not pass that same praise on to the ES 335's that I have seen. To my eyes and ears, it's as if they are made by a different company, and I had the opportunity to play a new, "Murphy Lab" Custom Shop. There's no way on this earth that I'd fork over $8500 for it.

I'll be keeping a look out for new Collins' stock at the local shop. That's a fine looking axe you've got there.
 

GearGeek01

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FWIW, this baby just arrived today... 2022 Epiphone (Inspired By Gibson) ES-339. $549.00... free shipping... drop dead gorgeous, fit and finish are great... it's everything I need in a 2 x HB semi-hollow... plus a tad bit smaller in size than an ES-335...

View attachment 1036512

I'm quoting myself as it has been a bit over a week since I first got my hands on the Epiphone ES-339 (Inspired by Gibson) model. $549.00, free shipping.

This is NOT a "toy" by any means. This is a very rock solid, beautiful, instrument I could have taken to a gig, delivered to my motel room, straight out of the box, tune it and go...

This particular model and make of guitar has been in the Epiphone line-up before, but the "Inspired by Gibson" (IBG) model is not the same as the previous "ES-339 PRO" (which had push/pulls on the vols for coil split)... I was able to play a NOS pre- IBG "Epiphone ES-339 PRO" along side the new "Epiphone ES-339 (IBG)"

This not your grandpa's 339.....

The fit and finish of the new IBG model were noticeable tighter. I really didn't like the push/pulls on the earlier PRO model. The IBG left off the push/pulls... and added something else I noticed (to my ears a big difference...)

The last guitar I had with the Alnico Classic pickups was a 2011 Epi LP Traditional Pro... those pups were terrible ice picks... (I couldn't wait to yank them out and put in a pair of Dimarzio John Petrucci Dream Catacher/Rainmaker set... mmmmm)..I noticed the same ice-pick-like in other Epi models of the era using those pups... Not so with the new IBG ES-339... these pups are full and rich, and act well with the volume and tone controls. Want a big fat jazz bebop guitar? Roll back the tone and select the neck pickup... wow...

Looking at the Sweetwater page for the USA Gibson ES-335 at $3,500... I could have 6.3 of the Epiphone guitars for the same price...

Which is pretty much what I always do... fixed income on disability means Gibson has permanently priced themselves out of my market... I still do business with Gibson... I just do it on the Epihone side...

One other word about the IBG series... as far as I know, they all use CTS pots, Switchcraft jacks and toggles... real world comparison... I have a 2018 Epi Joe Pass signature jazz guitar... just the jack... it's sloppy and cheap and I'll have to replace it soon and I've played the guitar 10 times tops...

I also have their IBG Epi SG Modern Figured... couple things I noticed... for one it is an SG with a SIDE JACK (not the annoying top of the body jack)... and when you plug in it goes (very loud and secure) "CLICK"... Switchcraft jack from the factory... I also have an IBG LP Modern Figured... same great quality...

I had the daydream that these Inspired By Gibson models may be the collector items of the future... they have certainly raised the bar over previous regular production Epiphones...

The SG Modern figured came in Translucent Red... most in this model were a Transparent Black... so I got one that was different... it is damned pretty... as are all of the Epiphones in this series... I also have an Epiphone (IBG) Firebird and case... this baby is balanced like no other... and the neck is very Les Paul reminiscent... looking at possibly their Epi (IBG) '58 Korina Flying V's as a next down the road purchase... (gotta find one still in stock...)
 

dreamingtele

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I'm quoting myself as it has been a bit over a week since I first got my hands on the Epiphone ES-339 (Inspired by Gibson) model. $549.00, free shipping.

This is NOT a "toy" by any means. This is a very rock solid, beautiful, instrument I could have taken to a gig, delivered to my motel room, straight out of the box, tune it and go...

This particular model and make of guitar has been in the Epiphone line-up before, but the "Inspired by Gibson" (IBG) model is not the same as the previous "ES-339 PRO" (which had push/pulls on the vols for coil split)... I was able to play a NOS pre- IBG "Epiphone ES-339 PRO" along side the new "Epiphone ES-339 (IBG)"

This not your grandpa's 339.....

The fit and finish of the new IBG model were noticeable tighter. I really didn't like the push/pulls on the earlier PRO model. The IBG left off the push/pulls... and added something else I noticed (to my ears a big difference...)

The last guitar I had with the Alnico Classic pickups was a 2011 Epi LP Traditional Pro... those pups were terrible ice picks... (I couldn't wait to yank them out and put in a pair of Dimarzio John Petrucci Dream Catacher/Rainmaker set... mmmmm)..I noticed the same ice-pick-like in other Epi models of the era using those pups... Not so with the new IBG ES-339... these pups are full and rich, and act well with the volume and tone controls. Want a big fat jazz bebop guitar? Roll back the tone and select the neck pickup... wow...

Looking at the Sweetwater page for the USA Gibson ES-335 at $3,500... I could have 6.3 of the Epiphone guitars for the same price...

Which is pretty much what I always do... fixed income on disability means Gibson has permanently priced themselves out of my market... I still do business with Gibson... I just do it on the Epihone side...

One other word about the IBG series... as far as I know, they all use CTS pots, Switchcraft jacks and toggles... real world comparison... I have a 2018 Epi Joe Pass signature jazz guitar... just the jack... it's sloppy and cheap and I'll have to replace it soon and I've played the guitar 10 times tops...

I also have their IBG Epi SG Modern Figured... couple things I noticed... for one it is an SG with a SIDE JACK (not the annoying top of the body jack)... and when you plug in it goes (very loud and secure) "CLICK"... Switchcraft jack from the factory... I also have an IBG LP Modern Figured... same great quality...

I had the daydream that these Inspired By Gibson models may be the collector items of the future... they have certainly raised the bar over previous regular production Epiphones...

The SG Modern figured came in Translucent Red... most in this model were a Transparent Black... so I got one that was different... it is damned pretty... as are all of the Epiphones in this series... I also have an Epiphone (IBG) Firebird and case... this baby is balanced like no other... and the neck is very Les Paul reminiscent... looking at possibly their Epi (IBG) '58 Korina Flying V's as a next down the road purchase... (gotta find one still in stock...)

While I agree with you,
The IBG models are indeed very good. I’ve compared it against standard 335’s and even my Nashville CS 61 reissue 335.

The IBG’s are great, buy it and take it straight to gigs, no problem! A little refining on set up, its gonna go punch waaaaay above it’s price.

However, like I said in my previous posts, since these are built to a pricepoint, the materials make the difference here. Ive seen china made guitars with really high end materials and it’s VERY good, so, I’m taking out the origin of the guitar in the equation.

There’s a considerable step up in feel with Gibsons, and that can be felt through the materials used in Gibsons.

I’m not even putting Gibson in a pedestal here, because when Peerless was making the ES-models, the fit, finish, quality of wood, build and how everything was put together rivals the more expensive Gibson.

In fact, My 97 ES-295 is every bit on par with my 2018 Memphis ES-330

Untitled by D Y, on Flickr

My point is, use the same high quality wood/materials/hardware as what Gibson uses, and the Epiphone line can actually compete for less money.
 




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