aaronlowther1993

TDPRI Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2016
Posts
53
Age
28
Location
Claremore, OK
Hello lads. Got a question for everyone out there. I have a pair of Ibanez TS-10 pedals on my workbench. One, simple enough, had a loose joint on the power supply plug. The other, has a sticky footswitch. Not the actual internal switch, but the plastic latch that triggers the internal switch. It's sticky, and therefore doesn't turn the pedal off and on reliably, and doesn't seem to come up enough. I was wondering if anyone could advise me on the best way of fixing this? The internal switch works great, so this should be a great pedal if I can unstick the switch. Tried some 3-in-1 oil, and that loosened it up some, but not as well as it should be.


Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
 

Peegoo

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Oct 11, 2019
Posts
11,187
Location
Challenging Definitions of Sin
3-in-1 oil is not optimal for use on plastic because it can break down plastics.

About the best lube for plastic and rubber is silicone grease. You can find this at any DIY shop that sells plumbing supplies, as it is used on water valves because it is waterproof and will not wash out. It's cheap, and available in tiny a plastic container that resembles a contact lens case.

Be very surgical with it; apply a teensy amount to the moving/friction parts with the point of a toothpick, exercise the moving part several times, and wipe off the excess. It takes a very small amount to be effective. Use too much and it will attract dust and dirt and accelerate wear.
 

aaronlowther1993

TDPRI Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2016
Posts
53
Age
28
Location
Claremore, OK
3-in-1 oil is not optimal for use on plastic because it can break down plastics.

About the best lube for plastic and rubber is silicone grease. You can find this at any DIY shop that sells plumbing supplies, as it is used on water valves because it is waterproof and will not wash out. It's cheap, and available in tiny a plastic container that resembles a contact lens case.

Be very surgical with it; apply a teensy amount to the moving/friction parts with the point of a toothpick, exercise the moving part several times, and wipe off the excess. It takes a very small amount to be effective. Use too much and it will attract dust and dirt and accelerate wear.

Good to know. Sadly, I don't think I can use that as I don't think I'll be able to get to where it needs to be in that manner.
 




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