Sticking With The Old Computers

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Guitarzan, Jul 19, 2019.

  1. Guitarzan

    Guitarzan Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,638
    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2006
    Location:
    Hotlanta, GA
    With all the talk of obsolescence it is easy to forget or overlook the dinosaurs that are still in use in various places like the armed services and nuclear plants. Cottage industries exist to keep old systems like the Digital Electronics Corp.'s PDP's in service. The original buyers have kept them in place due to the risk and expense of switching over to new systems, plus the benefit of the security of older technology.

    https://www.pcworld.com/article/249...it-ancient-computers-in-use-today.html?page=2
     
    DaphneBlue and nojazzhere like this.
  2. magicfingers99

    magicfingers99 Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,260
    Joined:
    May 7, 2015
    Location:
    atlanta
    There are still people making a living writing (and patching) COBOL code for legacy systems..
     
    Geo, tubedood and uriah1 like this.
  3. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    21,129
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2012
    Location:
    Montana
    People are still buying PCs.

    Ducking, ducking.;)
     
  4. Nubs

    Nubs Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    44
    Posts:
    1,937
    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2014
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    Hell, I took a COBOL class in 1999. I had no idea why but it was an absolute PITA to code with. Also did Turbo Pascal and C, then VB.

    Fun stuff. Not really, but I learned something...or something.
     
    Geo likes this.
  5. magicfingers99

    magicfingers99 Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,260
    Joined:
    May 7, 2015
    Location:
    atlanta
    this little baby could be yours for 8 ben franklins...

    upload_2019-7-19_17-33-34.jpeg
     
    Geo and tubedood like this.
  6. ricknbaker

    ricknbaker Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,005
    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2014
    Location:
    Watford, UK
    My dad used to be an operator on this AE1010 at RAF Hendon in the 60s


    i284852689459119127._szw1280h1280_.jpg
     
    Grandy, P Thought, Geo and 1 other person like this.
  7. magicfingers99

    magicfingers99 Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,260
    Joined:
    May 7, 2015
    Location:
    atlanta
    did he have a transistor radio to keep him company, like Group Captain Mandrake?

    upload_2019-7-19_18-21-39.jpeg

     
  8. uriah1

    uriah1 Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    20,309
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2011
    Location:
    Around
    Remember my old Tandy’s compaqs wang
     
    ricknbaker and Geo like this.
  9. bgmacaw

    bgmacaw Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,608
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2006
    Location:
    Near Athens GA USA
    It depends on how old. I wouldn't trust the security of older Windows versions connected to the internet. However, I'd guess older mainframe and mini systems are less connected and have security from obscurity. Just don't make me have to deal with working with data from System 36 or AS-400 systems again.
     
    OldDude2 and Geo like this.
  10. craigs63

    craigs63 Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    588
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2009
    Location:
    Naperville, IL
    Yep. And I'm keeping an eye out for the next gig, if you're hiring.
     
  11. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    67
    Posts:
    8,224
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2017
    Location:
    Foat Wuth, Texas
    In college in 1974 we Liberal Arts Majors (Music) had to take a basic computer programming course. The "brains" back then had some silly notion that these newfangled computer gadgets might have some importance someday.(yeah, what did they know, right?) We took some simple programming language (can't remember if it was COBOL or Fortran?) but what we had to do was "write" a program, make punch cards for each step, then take those cards to a counter, where the guys who worked there would take them and put them in line to "run". We would come back in several days to find out if it worked, and if not, we had to figure out which punch card wasn't right, fix it, and take the cards back to the counter, and start the whole process all over. Very time consuming and complicated. Sure glad they fixed that issue.....;)
     
    P Thought, Larry F, Believer and 3 others like this.
  12. Octorfunk

    Octorfunk Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    379
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2014
    Location:
    Midwest
    A friend of mine is an electrical engineer who recently did some contract work upgrading some US military missile sites. Before the upgrades, they were operating off of 3.5" floppy disks...
     
    Geo likes this.
  13. DavidP

    DavidP Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,466
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2003
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    Yep, that was my introduction to computing, Fortran and WatFor/Watfiv that you prayed would compile and fixed field format data cards, (I still have some punch cards!)
     
    nojazzhere likes this.
  14. tubedood

    tubedood Tele-Meister

    Age:
    54
    Posts:
    282
    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2018
    Location:
    Orlando
    My father bought the family an "Atari 800" computer in gosh 1981 or so. We were in a computer user club for the Atari for a year or so... Our next door neighbor had an Apple II he was quite a wiz at computing. Back then you needed at least a little savviness to get things to work, even loading a simple program. I would love to get a few vintage computers to put in the mancave!
     
  15. TeleTucson

    TeleTucson Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,344
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2016
    Location:
    Tucson, AZ
    My first "PC" was a Unix box with a whopping 40MB hard drive, in part because I shunned the notion that any software other than my own code would be of interest. After all, troff was a perfect text editor (no WYSIWYG then), and as long as I could run C and Fortran, what more could there be? :rolleyes:

    I've tried hard to be more cognizant of technological potential since then ... :D
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2019
    kingofdogs1950 and tubedood like this.
  16. djh22

    djh22 Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    993
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2012
    Location:
    VA
    [​IMG]




    And undoubtedly 5 1/4" disks before that!
     
    nojazzhere likes this.
  17. ReverendRevolver

    ReverendRevolver Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    800
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2019
    Location:
    Ohio (Nerk)
    My dad collected Commodore 64s in the 90s, so that he could have more than just his 2 from the 80s. Made good fun periodically, but everything but the games were obsolete by the time I was born, because the Amiga was simply better.
    I remember in the early 90s going to Sun TV and him buying his first CD ROM equipped computer. It came with an encyclopedia disk and Kings Quest VI.
    I remember booting DOOM from DOS out of windows, and having to sync the freaking gravis pad as it started.

    My children will never know what any of that even means.

    Anyway,

    At work, the core of most systems was ran on DOS based stuff until 2 years ago. The programmers had long since retired, and allegedly wanted too much money to help integrate. None of the new IT people could comprehend thier security protocols, so 2 years back, started building new stuff from the ground up.
    Say what you want, that stuff is harder to hack than windows. You could have 10 year olds In 1997 get into trouble though Windows 95 sucking. I loved windows 98. It was a massive improvement, and nobody else in the 4th grade ever knew how junky 95 was. 2000 sucked, XP was ok. Actually, I prefer that over everything recent.......
    I built computers for my first fulltimejob. Its funny, in less than 10 years, 4gig hard drives were replaced by 40 gig ones at thier relative lk eval of "functional " and I still remember when flash drives first got affordable for "big sizes". By which I mean a 512 meg one.
    Modern phones of course smoke all of the things I mentioned;
    But good freaking luck hacking a Commodore 64....
    I'm shocked more places aren't still running DOS based stuff for security purposes alone.
     
  18. Brad Pittiful

    Brad Pittiful Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    17,218
    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2008
    Location:
    Philly Burbs
    my pc i use has vista operating system...i have a 2 year old laptop waiting to be used when my desktop stops working
     
    Paul in Colorado likes this.
  19. viperdss

    viperdss TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    28
    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2011
    Location:
    seattle
    Still have a functional PDP11/23+ in the garage. 256k ram, 20 meg hard drive and a 300 baud modem. I also have windows disks all the way back to 3.1 and dos disks from before that.
     
    Tsquared, uriah1 and VWAmTele like this.
  20. Kerberos

    Kerberos Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    Age:
    69
    Posts:
    567
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2016
    Location:
    Long Island
    Not being a wiseguy, but it's Digital Equipment Corp. I'm a ex-DEC employee. Great company, we made some terrific products, and produced some fantastic innovations that are still in use today. However, a company run by engineers is not the best way to promote a business. It was said that if Digital opened a Sushi Bar, we would have marketed it as a "Dead Fish Store"..
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.