Stepping in for a another guitarist. Proper decorum.

Sparky2

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Great responses and opinions all around.

My vote is for A.) by default, with just a bit of B.) when the feeling is right.

A big part of being in a community of musicians is becoming known as a professional who can be counted upon to deliver the goods, without any drama or excessive ego.

If you play the songs correctly and tastefully, without any flashy "look at me" loudness, you will find yourself falling into the pocket with the drummer. You will find your groove. Keep your stage monitor pointed halfway between yourself and the drummer.
You will always hear him, but you really need to make sure he can hear you.

During rehearsal, show just a bit of your virtuosity somewhere near the end of the practice session.
If the band members respond favorably, then you will know that it's okay to bring some of that during the live performance.

At the live gig, keep it steady and respectable.
Then the other band members want you to bring the heat, especially during a song where the crowd is on the dance floor, they'll nod your way and tell you to go for it.

What you want to do is to ride a fine diplomatic line between
establishing your chops for all to see
and
not alienating the band members or audience members who have a fond allegiance to the original guitar player.

Okay, I'm gonna shut up now.

:(
 

Midgetje94

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I wouldn’t just stand in the back. I’d definitely show my ability (as why they contacted you and not someone else) so be tasteful and respectful as this is THEIR band and as someone mentioned above. This isn’t an audition or a feeler. It’s a filler. Highlight your ability, throw a few fillers and riffs in tastefully. Have fun. But more importantly, don’t step on toes.

You do good here and get along with the group, they will remember your respect and playing. If need arises in the future for a filler, or they know another group who needs a temp/new member. They may very likely pass your name on
 

Marc Morfei

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Great responses and opinions all around.

My vote is for A.) by default, with just a bit of B.) when the feeling is right.

A big part of being in a community of musicians is becoming known as a professional who can be counted upon to deliver the goods, without any drama or excessive ego.

If you play the songs correctly and tastefully, without any flashy "look at me" loudness, you will find yourself falling into the pocket with the drummer. You will find your groove. Keep your stage monitor pointed halfway between yourself and the drummer.
You will always hear him, but you really need to make sure he can hear you.

During rehearsal, show just a bit of your virtuosity somewhere near the end of the practice session.
If the band members respond favorably, then you will know that it's okay to bring some of that during the live performance.

At the live gig, keep it steady and respectable.
Then the other band members want you to bring the heat, especially during a song where the crowd is on the dance floor, they'll nod your way and tell you to go for it.

What you want to do is to ride a fine diplomatic line between
establishing your chops for all to see
and
not alienating the band members or audience members who have a fond allegiance to the original guitar player.

Okay, I'm gonna shut up now.
:(
Yep, that's the perfect response. Stay in the background, don't play too loud, don't show off, but step out in front once in a while at the appropriate times.
 

FMA

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Play tastefully. I recommend this no matter whose gig it is.

Yes, and be professional. Your job is not to show off how well you can play. It's to play the songs. When I think of it, playing what the song requires shows the level of the guitar player's talent.
 

Jazzcaster21

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Do the job required to the best of your ability.
If it turns out that later on, the other guy either quits or gets fired, then may be you'll get the call.
 

Chester P Squier

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So, Cosmic Cowboy, shall we assume you have played the gig by now?

If so, how did it go? Inquiring minds want to know. And which advice did you take?
 

pippoman

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Yep, that's the perfect response. Stay in the background, don't play too loud, don't show off, but step out in front once in a while at the appropriate times.
You’re right Marc. Steve Cropper said in an interview that he played to make the band sound better, not to shine a light on himself. Since the OP is filling in and not auditioning, that seems a good place to start. Play well and clean for them, unlike the shredders you always seem to find at Guitar Center. There’s always an appropriate moment when he’ll need to shine, but not on every song.

My dad had some folks over for a jam and evidently he had been bragging on my playing, which I’d rather he didn’t do, but there was one guy who insisted on playing repetitious riffs on pretty much every song and all the way through each song, even while someone was singing, so I just played rhythm for a while and politely left saying “looks like y’all have it. I enjoyed it.” Don’t be that guy, worrying someone else might play a little better if you give him a spot.
 

Bartholomew3

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I asked a keyboard player to come into a session last week. He was exceptional a couple of years back but everything stopped at that time due to pandemic.

Maybe it was the 2 year break. He was so happy to be asked into it he blew his brains out all night, was way too loud with no dynamics, was showing off everywhere and blew his time in a few places due to rust I guess after 2 years of inactivity.

Won't be coming back for sure. Poor self-control, lack of consideration for other players in the room. We don't expect anyone to be perfect but need a guy who is more respectful and aware of the total sound. Fortunately it was a rehearsal.

All he had to do was play the track and not show-off and we would have been OK with him. Mostly easy Blues-Pop-Soft-Rock, should have just fallen into it. Have no problem with a player showing-off when it's his time to solo but this guy became a mess through almost every tune.
 

schmee

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Is the guitar player you are replacing their main up front person? Then go with B.
If not, I'd hang back a bit, do your thing, but not overly so.
 

dogmeat

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I was gonna say "yeah, but Erics not here is he" (Jeff Beck early on after joining the Yardbirds)

but its more useful to reiterate the bit about getting a groove with the drummer. the guitar is a rhythm instrument.

unless they want flash
 

archtop_fjk

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I concur with those above who advised “make the BAND look good”. That’s job number one. And make sure to nail all the important riffs and changes. Do you have all the song arrangements clarified? For example they may start “Funk 49” with a different riff or end the middle drum/rhythm bit in a different way from the record. These kinds of variations in songs from the recorded versions always keeps me on my toes if I’m sitting in with a new band. Most of all, have fun!!
 




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