Squier Really Upped Their Game

GearGeek01

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Jan 26, 2007
Posts
540
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Detroit
I'm GASSsing for a Squier Clssic Vibe 60s Jazzmaster in 3 Color Sunburst. Fender and Squier do several things they call "Jazzmasters" but most of the time don't have all of the traditional switching, or they have humbuckers or something weird. This Squier has all the right switches, rollers and traditional stuff. Plus, the price fits my disabled budget, LOL.

My love for the Jazzmaster started in around 1987-1989 when I studied guitar with jazz maestro Ted Greene in Encino, CA. My main guitar was a 1980 Gibson Les Paul Artisan, and it had been back to the guys in Kalamazoo TWICE for warranty repair and they never did getit right (now they are making Heritage guitars, LOL)... The fretboard where it met the body was loftinh up and Gibson Kalamazoo couldn't get it right.

I was living in L.A. at the time and a friend who was going to Guitar Institute of Technology got me Ted Greene's phone number and he took me on as a student. Well, the same friend found a referral to a luthier in L.A. and I gave him my LP to fix. While it was in the shop for several weeks, Ted let me borrow and take home his 1965 Jazzmaster. Mostly because I had a jazz gig with a combo I had been jamming with that played for the aftyer party for the major league All-Stars that year.

I've always loved Jazzmasters after that time and I've always wanted one. I wish I knew who had Ted's '65 JM after he passed, but it probably went to a closer friend or relative, but I would love to have that guitar.

I did have for a wile a Fender Classic Player Jazzmaster Special. It was in the same line as the Classic Player Baja Teles so many of us know about (I had one of those, too... it is my avatar here). I sold the CPJMS to may pastore in Florida before I moved to Michigan. There was also a Classic Player 50s Strat I'd love to have. That whole Fender Classic Player live was awesome. They tried replacing it with their new "Vintera" line, but IMHO, dropped the ball... plus added $400-50-0 to the price tag (yikes)/... too much for a Mexi-Fender for me... My first Mexicoan Fender I got in 1998 was a Nashville Tele that brand new in 1998 was $450. IMHO, that's about the price Mexi-Fenders still should be... but somehow they snuck in Squiers now at the price, and many of the Mexi-Fenders are over $1,000...
 

Rubeus Hagrid

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Joined
Dec 27, 2021
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Age
93
Location
Hogwarts
I picked up a Squire Paranormal Offset (Jazzcaster) recently, and it’s great. Probably better finished than my 3 USA models. Pickups were fine, but I replaced them with some DiMarzios I had laying around. Also upgraded the jack and tuners. Completely unnecessary mods, but figured I would do it anyway. Great fretwork and nice grain on the poplar body. Sounds and plays fantastic.
 

Castelvanis

NEW MEMBER!
Joined
Jun 16, 2022
Posts
2
Age
28
Location
Washington
I've been using Jazzmaster for a long time and haven't found a better option for me yet, because it combines everything you need to get a buzz out of playing it.
 

Castelvanis

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Jun 16, 2022
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Location
Washington
I've owned several Squier instruments the last 25 years. If my memory doesn't fail an Affinity P-bass, California Series Stratocaster, Showmaster, California Series Telecaster (red), Affinity Stratocaster, California Series Jazz Bass, Classic Vibe MIC Telecaster, and California Series Telecaster (white).

I like the stuff Squier puts out, most the times their quality is really nice. There are better series in their different lines for sure, and I have noticed their Chinese instruments are a bit better than the ones that are made in Indonesia. Or perhaps it is a difference in the series? Tuners are the most noticeable difference between the Affinity and California series. I also noticed better attention to detail in the California series instruments. Now the Classic Vibe line of instruments is definitely one step ahead of the rest. CV instruments are fantastic, and can be used by professional musicians anywhere with a lil setup work. Pots and pickups are good quality, you don't feel the need of doing any changes to them. Again, I have seen slight differences in the CV guitars made in China and Indonesia, the Chinese being a lil bit better. Not that the Indonesia stuff isn't good, don't get me wrong.

I'm surprised Fender is marketing the Classic Vibe guitars under their Squier brand. Classic Vibe instruments sometimes feel better than the stuff Fender is making in Mexico these days. Again, not saying their MiM guitars are not nice, just that the MIC Classic Vibe is really surprising in terms of quality and tone (and of course, PRICE too).

I also remember the Squier instruments made in Japan in the 90's. They're fantastic. If you happen to come across a used one don't let it go. One surprising guitar I remember working on for a client was a 1996 Korean Squier Stratocaster that blew me completely. The thing was awesome. And I remember thinking "this here Strat puts to shame my Cousin's white MiM Stratocaster". I was really turned-off by the quality and overall cheap feel of my cousin's 1993 Mexican Stratocaster. But lately I've started not only to follow the guitar instrument market, but also decided to play something more gambling, like a casino. But when I just decided to start, this whole area was very hidden to me and I never would have thought that there are really so many worthy representatives there. I read at pokiesman.com/free-pokies/ that there are many casinos where you can play first in demo mode to practice, work out a strategy, understand how the machines work and not lose money. So I think it's worth reading where there is such a functional if you decide to do it too.
Y'all have a good weekend, and don't forget to PLAY your guitars or in a casino! ;)
Squier seems to me to have given up a bit lately, but I agree with the analysis on the whole.
 

FSRCustomTeleHHGT

Tele-Meister
Joined
Jun 25, 2022
Posts
149
Age
62
Location
Republic of Squierland
Squier seems to me to have given up a bit lately, but I agree with the analysis on the whole.
Given what up? Paranormal Toronado, Offset Telecaster, Cabronita Thinline Tele, Super-Sonic, Cyclone, Baritone Cabronita Telecaster, Mini P Bass, 40th Anniversary models, the Contemporary series... Not sure what you mean. And the quality overall has never been better. Just about all those old Vintage Modified models that are now Classic Vibes have received meaningful upgrades, including the bridge on the Bass VI that I just bought. Even guys like Mike Rutherford are playing Bullet Strats on tour now. There's never been a better time to purchase Squiers than right now.
 

Martian

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Mar 15, 2020
Posts
584
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New York State
I've owned several Squier instruments the last 25 years. If my memory doesn't fail an Affinity P-bass, California Series Stratocaster, Showmaster, California Series Telecaster (red), Affinity Stratocaster, California Series Jazz Bass, Classic Vibe MIC Telecaster, and California Series Telecaster (white).

I like the stuff Squier puts out, most the times their quality is really nice. There are better series in their different lines for sure, and I have noticed their Chinese instruments are a bit better than the ones that are made in Indonesia. Or perhaps it is a difference in the series? Tuners are the most noticeable difference between the Affinity and California series. I also noticed better attention to detail in the California series instruments. Now the Classic Vibe line of instruments is definitely one step ahead of the rest. CV instruments are fantastic, and can be used by professional musicians anywhere with a lil setup work. Pots and pickups are good quality, you don't feel the need of doing any changes to them. Again, I have seen slight differences in the CV guitars made in China and Indonesia, the Chinese being a lil bit better. Not that the Indonesia stuff isn't good, don't get me wrong.

I'm surprised Fender is marketing the Classic Vibe guitars under their Squier brand. Classic Vibe instruments sometimes feel better than the stuff Fender is making in Mexico these days. Again, not saying their MiM guitars are not nice, just that the MIC Classic Vibe is really surprising in terms of quality and tone (and of course, PRICE too).

I also remember the Squier instruments made in Japan in the 90's. They're fantastic. If you happen to come across a used one don't let it go. One surprising guitar I remember working on for a client was a 1996 Korean Squier Stratocaster that blew me completely. The thing was awesome. And I remember thinking "this here Strat puts to shame my Cousin's white MiM Stratocaster". I was really turned-off by the quality and overall cheap feel of my cousin's 1993 Mexican Stratocaster.

Y'all have a good weekend, and don't forget to PLAY your guitars! ;)
That ‘96 Strat was probably a “Pro Tone” model. I think they only made them for a few years. High quality, great guitars.
 

Martian

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Gold Supporter
Joined
Mar 15, 2020
Posts
584
Location
New York State
I'm GASSsing for a Squier Clssic Vibe 60s Jazzmaster in 3 Color Sunburst. Fender and Squier do several things they call "Jazzmasters" but most of the time don't have all of the traditional switching, or they have humbuckers or something weird. This Squier has all the right switches, rollers and traditional stuff. Plus, the price fits my disabled budget, LOL.

My love for the Jazzmaster started in around 1987-1989 when I studied guitar with jazz maestro Ted Greene in Encino, CA. My main guitar was a 1980 Gibson Les Paul Artisan, and it had been back to the guys in Kalamazoo TWICE for warranty repair and they never did getit right (now they are making Heritage guitars, LOL)... The fretboard where it met the body was loftinh up and Gibson Kalamazoo couldn't get it right.

I was living in L.A. at the time and a friend who was going to Guitar Institute of Technology got me Ted Greene's phone number and he took me on as a student. Well, the same friend found a referral to a luthier in L.A. and I gave him my LP to fix. While it was in the shop for several weeks, Ted let me borrow and take home his 1965 Jazzmaster. Mostly because I had a jazz gig with a combo I had been jamming with that played for the aftyer party for the major league All-Stars that year.

I've always loved Jazzmasters after that time and I've always wanted one. I wish I knew who had Ted's '65 JM after he passed, but it probably went to a closer friend or relative, but I would love to have that guitar.

I did have for a wile a Fender Classic Player Jazzmaster Special. It was in the same line as the Classic Player Baja Teles so many of us know about (I had one of those, too... it is my avatar here). I sold the CPJMS to may pastore in Florida before I moved to Michigan. There was also a Classic Player 50s Strat I'd love to have. That whole Fender Classic Player live was awesome. They tried replacing it with their new "Vintera" line, but IMHO, dropped the ball... plus added $400-50-0 to the price tag (yikes)/... too much for a Mexi-Fender for me... My first Mexicoan Fender I got in 1998 was a Nashville Tele that brand new in 1998 was $450. IMHO, that's about the price Mexi-Fenders still should be... but somehow they snuck in Squiers now at the price, and many of the Mexi-Fenders are over $1,000...
You studied with Ted Greene?? Wow. Not only was he amazing and seriously brilliant but his tone was, to me, incredible.
 

GearGeek01

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Joined
Jan 26, 2007
Posts
540
Location
Detroit
You studied with Ted Greene?? Wow. Not only was he amazing and seriously brilliant but his tone was, to me, incredible.
Yes...

My first jazz instructor was Robert Conti (1984-1986) when he and I lived near Jacksonville, Florida. If you Google his name, he has a huge supply of very easy to comprehend "Jo Scales, No MOdes" jazz instruction he has been (now) very successful with. Joe Pass (who Conti gre up with as best friends in Philedelphia) said of Conti "the fastest guitarist in the world"... crystal clean and "no distortion to cover all the mistakes"... seriously IMHO, noy "heavy metal" guy can touch him note for note... here is a rendtion of his head he names "Rotation" which is over the chord changes to "Cherokee"


When I moved to L.A. in 1986, I met and studied privately with Phil Upchurch. If you like the George Benson songs "On Braodway" and "This Masquerade" and others during that time... Phil was Benson's rhythm guitar players and he was the arranger for Benson during those years. I studied with Phil at his home in North Hollywood, CA. Phil's resume today is a literal Who's Who of musicians and artists...

With George Benson

Bad Benson (CTI, 1974)
Good King Bad (CTI, 1975)
Breezin' (Warner Bros., 1976)
In Flight (Warner Bros., 1977)
Livin' Inside Your Love (Warner Bros., 1979)


Ted Greene's personality mayched his impreccable tone. He was a very sweet and gentle man, with books everywhere all over his apartment. Of those years (1987-1989) he wasn't just a teacher, Ted was my friend who I loved very much. I used to drive 60 miles from Garden Grove to Ted's apartment in Encino for every leasson. I would park in the street, then walk the fairly long sidewalk beside his apartment building to his apartment. If I was early to my lesson, he'd have me sit in a room at the back pf his apartment where he told me I was allowed to read any book (of hundreds) he had on the shelves back there.

Each lesson, Ted handed out what we sort of named "Ted Sheets"... some kind of often hand-written and copied set of chord diagrams of complete chord melody of songs or chord studies. In all, I have 55 "Ted Sheets" I got from his lessons. When in 1989 I knew I was moving, I scheduled several hpur blcoks back to back with Ted, and had him go through every Ted Sheet from start to finish he had given me in all my lessons. I also brought with me a TASCAM 225 Syncaset 2-track recorder and an Electro-Voice mic and recorded all 3 hours of Ted Sheet reviews. Even though there is a lot of free material on the Ted Greene Tribute page, including private lesson recordings, hundred and hundreds of Ted Sheets, etc... I have never released my 3 hour Ted Sheet review recordings.

I have not settled in one place for a number of years but on May 1, I just moved into a 2 bedroom place of my own. The first place of my own for many years. I am looking at ways to set up a stereo system (or plug my TASACAM cassette deck which I still have) into my computer. It has been many years since I have listened to the 3 hour Ted Sheet review. I would like to convert it to MP3, and included scanned copies of my Ted Sheets to the Ted Greene Tribute page for all to enjoy.

Get out your Tom Terrific thinking caps if you dare, and give that page a view... no matter what style or genre of music you play...

What jazz studies can do for your metal, rock, blues, or country playing... Even if you don't like jazz... even if you never see yourself learning a jazz songs note for note or playing jazz in public... If you delve into jazz and take your practice time seriously, whatever other style of music you might attempt after that will be better. Turn off all the effects (except maye a little sweet reverb) and string up one of your favorite guitars with a set of 0.012s... That right there will give your fingers an extra workout already... I used to string my '57 re-issue Fotoflme MIJ Strat with 0.012s and tune down to C to C (then tune normally)... I also used a set of 0.012s on my Les Paul, tuned D to D... (tuning down with big strings is something Ted showed me)... not for the prupose of death metal drop tuning and distortion... but for the deeper, richer tone that guage of strings has to offer when played crystal clean... Also the drop tuning allows for a bit less tension on the neck for the more complicated chords... or if all you have is an acoustic guitar, and the tension is killing your fingers, string it up with a set of 0.010s electric guitar strings... still plays great, a little less volume, but easy on the fingertips...

To start, I might suggest some of the Robert Conti "No Scales, No Modes" method... Conti's philosophy is to NOT go into jazz through the music theory door (unless you want to be bogged down for years and get no where...) Here's a quote from his page:
"You Will Only Learn To Play Jazz Guitar, By Playing Jazz Guitar." More on this here:

You can scroll around on his website here:

Have a happy and safe 4th of July today (7/4/22)
 

Martian

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Gold Supporter
Joined
Mar 15, 2020
Posts
584
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Yes...

My first jazz instructor was Robert Conti (1984-1986) when he and I lived near Jacksonville, Florida. If you Google his name, he has a huge supply of very easy to comprehend "Jo Scales, No MOdes" jazz instruction he has been (now) very successful with. Joe Pass (who Conti gre up with as best friends in Philedelphia) said of Conti "the fastest guitarist in the world"... crystal clean and "no distortion to cover all the mistakes"... seriously IMHO, noy "heavy metal" guy can touch him note for note... here is a rendtion of his head he names "Rotation" which is over the chord changes to "Cherokee"


When I moved to L.A. in 1986, I met and studied privately with Phil Upchurch. If you like the George Benson songs "On Braodway" and "This Masquerade" and others during that time... Phil was Benson's rhythm guitar players and he was the arranger for Benson during those years. I studied with Phil at his home in North Hollywood, CA. Phil's resume today is a literal Who's Who of musicians and artists...

With George Benson

Bad Benson (CTI, 1974)
Good King Bad (CTI, 1975)
Breezin' (Warner Bros., 1976)
In Flight (Warner Bros., 1977)
Livin' Inside Your Love (Warner Bros., 1979)


Ted Greene's personality mayched his impreccable tone. He was a very sweet and gentle man, with books everywhere all over his apartment. Of those years (1987-1989) he wasn't just a teacher, Ted was my friend who I loved very much. I used to drive 60 miles from Garden Grove to Ted's apartment in Encino for every leasson. I would park in the street, then walk the fairly long sidewalk beside his apartment building to his apartment. If I was early to my lesson, he'd have me sit in a room at the back pf his apartment where he told me I was allowed to read any book (of hundreds) he had on the shelves back there.

Each lesson, Ted handed out what we sort of named "Ted Sheets"... some kind of often hand-written and copied set of chord diagrams of complete chord melody of songs or chord studies. In all, I have 55 "Ted Sheets" I got from his lessons. When in 1989 I knew I was moving, I scheduled several hpur blcoks back to back with Ted, and had him go through every Ted Sheet from start to finish he had given me in all my lessons. I also brought with me a TASCAM 225 Syncaset 2-track recorder and an Electro-Voice mic and recorded all 3 hours of Ted Sheet reviews. Even though there is a lot of free material on the Ted Greene Tribute page, including private lesson recordings, hundred and hundreds of Ted Sheets, etc... I have never released my 3 hour Ted Sheet review recordings.

I have not settled in one place for a number of years but on May 1, I just moved into a 2 bedroom place of my own. The first place of my own for many years. I am looking at ways to set up a stereo system (or plug my TASACAM cassette deck which I still have) into my computer. It has been many years since I have listened to the 3 hour Ted Sheet review. I would like to convert it to MP3, and included scanned copies of my Ted Sheets to the Ted Greene Tribute page for all to enjoy.

Get out your Tom Terrific thinking caps if you dare, and give that page a view... no matter what style or genre of music you play...

What jazz studies can do for your metal, rock, blues, or country playing... Even if you don't like jazz... even if you never see yourself learning a jazz songs note for note or playing jazz in public... If you delve into jazz and take your practice time seriously, whatever other style of music you might attempt after that will be better. Turn off all the effects (except maye a little sweet reverb) and string up one of your favorite guitars with a set of 0.012s... That right there will give your fingers an extra workout already... I used to string my '57 re-issue Fotoflme MIJ Strat with 0.012s and tune down to C to C (then tune normally)... I also used a set of 0.012s on my Les Paul, tuned D to D... (tuning down with big strings is something Ted showed me)... not for the prupose of death metal drop tuning and distortion... but for the deeper, richer tone that guage of strings has to offer when played crystal clean... Also the drop tuning allows for a bit less tension on the neck for the more complicated chords... or if all you have is an acoustic guitar, and the tension is killing your fingers, string it up with a set of 0.010s electric guitar strings... still plays great, a little less volume, but easy on the fingertips...

To start, I might suggest some of the Robert Conti "No Scales, No Modes" method... Conti's philosophy is to NOT go into jazz through the music theory door (unless you want to be bogged down for years and get no where...) Here's a quote from his page:
"You Will Only Learn To Play Jazz Guitar, By Playing Jazz Guitar." More on this here:

You can scroll around on his website here:

Have a happy and safe 4th of July today (7/4/22)

This is so great. I really appreciate this, thank you. And I’m gonna try heavier strings tuned down. That helps explain that tone of his which, to me, was about as good as it gets. Thank you, again, and happy 4th of July!
 




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