Squier CV 60s wiring difference to 50s

Discussion in 'Squier Tele Forum' started by Squierdo, Sep 21, 2020.

  1. Boreas

    Boreas Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Glad you went back to zero with the pups for now. Pups are only part of the power generator. The other part is the strings. You should try experimenting with various string alloys and string gauges. These variables work subtly with the pups to develop tone and output. Something as far off as a different guitar pick material or thickness can also impact tone by impacting attack.

    I love most of the Squier lineup. Not a particular fan of the Affinity, but that's just me. If I had one wish, I wish they would come with Fender Vintage slotted tuners installed, but I find the stock tuners work fine. Perhaps you will notice an improvement in tone with the new saddles, perhaps not. But it is worth a try if you don't like the standard 3-piece.

    An incredible number of variables effect tone. Tone is a journey, not a destination.
     
  2. Boreas

    Boreas Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Don't believe everything you see/hear on YT. There are really no real standards, including vocabulary. I did notice three things in the excellent video:

    1. It appears he has his neck pup set quite high. Can't really tell with the bridge.
    2. He is playing with a pedal that is increasing gain which can create twang out of mud.
    3. He is playing without a pick. This adds an entire layer of tonal variables. I prefer fingerpicking as well, but no two people's fingers or techniques are the same. If you have callused fingers and hard nails, you can really get some twang - often more than with a pick. I have fat fingers with paper nails and get a very mellow attack.

    I wish this type of video would focus on the guitar's factory sound, not the author's personal tonal preferences. Set the guitar to factory setup specs, play it straight into a clean amp. Play with a pick and fingers to illustrate the difference. Then if you want to add pedals at the end to show how the guitar responds to altering the signal, go nuts. But first, show us the stock guitar.
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2020
  3. Jay Jernigan

    Jay Jernigan Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    Glad you got it sorted out, OP. I'm aware that you were inquiring about the CV '60's, of which I have no direct knowledge, and I responded based on a CV '50's experience. While there is more than one way to attach a tone circuit, each of which has its champions and detractors, it was my opinion that most of the CV's were alike in that regard.
     
  4. havlma1

    havlma1 Tele-Meister

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    I have two CVCs and one CV 50s Vintage Blond - therefore 2x A5 pickups and 1x A3 pickup. When I compare them I'd say no matter if the pickup is A5 or A3, it sounds different in different guitar (body + neck).

    The A5 in both CVC sounds differently even though they have both rosewood/maple necks and alder bodies. One CVC sounds great, the other sounds bit thin. When I put A3 Tonerider TRT2 into that CVC which sounds thin, it didnt help. The CV50s with A3 also sounds great, so no change there.

    So go and figure out ;) I think there is no rule what your sound will be like. All instruments are individual.. No two "the same" guitars are the same and sound the same.
     
  5. Squierdo

    Squierdo TDPRI Member

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    At the moment i am trying ernie balls super slinky nickel (9-42). i am thinking about trying 10s with cobalt coating. Strings can really affect the tone..

    About the 3-way saddle.. I want to keep the guitar almost looking like it is. The default saddle would be ok but i can't manage to get a nearly perfect intonation. The b string is very sharp while the e string is perfectly in tune. I think i will buy the 3 way fender compensated brass saddle. But 35€ (40 dollar) is much money for such small things.

    Thanks for the input Boreas. I will try different picks.. Until now i just took one from a jar of collected picks when i grab a guitar :p
     
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  6. Boreas

    Boreas Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Hold off on a new saddles/bridge until you see what the string change does. This may get your intonation where it needs to be. And remember, sometimes you can modify a single saddle with a Dremel tool to get the intonation dialed in.
     
  7. Squierdo

    Squierdo TDPRI Member

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    That's is all good knowledge from more experienced players. It was a good decision to join here.

    I would really also like to know what kind of delay pedal and overdrive he uses.

    But tonal wise my change of the pickups to the vintage plus was a big improvement. The squier has already a good twang without any delay. Now exercising some rock n' roll riffs and licks are lots of fun.
     
  8. Squierdo

    Squierdo TDPRI Member

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    Good idea. If it doesn't work out i can still order the expensive stuff.

    Strings can really make the difference.
    I am always surprised how much areas they can affect. I saw that with my epiphone les paul. It was ordered online
    and had some really annoying buzzing on the A string on three lower frets. I pressed them down with a piece of wood, used the truss rod (which i certainly not thought would help much).
    It annoyed me to think about bringing the guitar to a luthier.. I had it on my list but after changing strings for the second time to a different brand it went away!! Sure i used it for some time and did a lot of bending on the affected string area but from one day to the other the problem was gone.
     
  9. Squierdo

    Squierdo TDPRI Member

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    That's a very good information. So yes, wood makes a difference. Not like people on youtube want to make one think. One guy put humbuckers in a guitar he built from concrete to show thats all about the pickups..

    So you make it easy for me... In the (hope not so) long run i need a second Telecaster.. The 50s squier :D
    I hope there will not be much difference from one guitar to the other in the same line of model.

    Some butterscotch look very much white lacquered on google images where others look really good.

    Thanks Havlma1 :)
     
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  10. Hastings

    Hastings Tele-Meister

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    To my way of thinking, the stock Tele neck pickup is the most "normal" (and to me, unidentifiable) guitar pickup there is. That is, it is the generic 'electric guitar' pickup sound to me. I have ignored Tele bridge pickups after the first few months of playing a Tele, long ago. The me, a Tele is a one-pickup guitar, and a very useful one. I know the bridge pickup has its uses - Long Cool Woman In A Black Dress - but I live without it.
     
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