Squier Classic Vibe 50s Refinish

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by rstaaf, Aug 2, 2021.

  1. rstaaf

    rstaaf Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

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    Well, looking for input here. Noob to refinishing so I will likely have lots of questions.
    I am looking to take a spare Vintage Blonde CV50 pine body, strip it and give it a slight amber, gloss finish.
    I am hoping to get the body a similar color and gloss as the neck.
    Any suggestions as to stain or finish that might get the pine body close to the yellowish amber of the maple neck?
    Since the neck is poly, I want to go with a clear poly over the body as well.

    The neck looks darker in the picture than it actually is, I also have a BSB CV50 and this neck is quite a bit lighter than that.
    The grain on this body isn't spectacular, but this is just a practice guitar and I am just looking for something different on it.

    20210803_003530383_iOS.jpg
     
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  2. ChicknPickn

    ChicknPickn Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    There is no better sealant for resinous woods than shellac. Shellac is excellent as both a sealant and an undercoat for poly. Shellac flakes can be purchased in various shades, from nearly clear to deep amber. You might want to take a look at medium amber. I have had superb result spraying shellac from a PreVal unit. Others brush or wipe it on. I've used all methods, but prefer spraying. As you may know, shellac dries very quickly in low to medium humidity environments. A wipe-on poly finishes it off beautifully. You will be amazed at how shellac makes grain pop.

    Oh, forgot to mention: you'll want high-quality DE-WAXED flakes. A good place to shop is http://www.shellac.net .
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2021
  3. jfgesquire

    jfgesquire Friend of Leo's

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    This link below is a dewaxed shellac, great right out of the can.

    Ifin you're in the U.S.


    If you foam brush apply it, you will get overlap lines that may need to be sanded a little with 320. And shellac is gummy and will fill up your sandpaper very quickly.

    But.... Shellac sticks to everything and everything sticks to shellac.

    I just used it as a seal coat on a mahogany neck, before and after pore filler, and followed it with Minwax wipe on polyurethane.

    https://www.rockler.com/zinsser-bullseye-sealcoat
     
  4. Drak

    Drak Tele-Afflicted

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  5. ChicknPickn

    ChicknPickn Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Dang, I want to know more! How do ye do it?
     
  6. Drak

    Drak Tele-Afflicted

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    [​IMG]
     
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  7. ChicknPickn

    ChicknPickn Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    It's gotta be nitro.
     
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  8. klasher

    klasher Tele-Holic

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    Rstaff, how did you strip the original finish off?
     
  9. rstaaf

    rstaaf Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

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    Lots and lots of sanding :eek: I still have the edges to do.
     
  10. rstaaf

    rstaaf Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

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    Any suggestions on a clear finish to seal the cavities? That old conductive paint is a chalky mess and I would like to seal it in the cavities before doing any other finish work. I want to make sure whatever I use in the cavities will bond to the old conductive paint and not cause adhesion problems for the copper foil shielding to come.

    Thanks
    Bob
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2021
  11. stratisfied

    stratisfied Tele-Afflicted

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    Here is my $.02. Forget shellac unless you have a spray rig and know how to use it. If you brush it and have normal skills, you can expect lap marks, uneven coverage (especially if you tint it) and a gummy substrate for your final finish. Preval Sprayer? ... Never had any luck with them or spray cans of shellac for that matter. neither atomized the spray beyond small droplet size and I just got a hazy, rough finish.

    As far as the tinted lacquers (Stewmac Vintage Amber, ReRanch Burst Amber, Mohawk Starburst Amber) they work well but are hard to get even coverage without streaks on a flat surface like a body if you haven't had lots of practice. The other problem for a beginner is you will get lost in trying to even out the color and wind up darker than desired. With Reranch Neck Amber, it goes from "not quite enough" to a bunch of bananas the blink of an eye which is why I prefer the others listed.

    For a first timer, I would suggest sanding until the wood between the grain is uniformly white, apply MinWax Prestain Condition (or a light spray coat of satin lacquer) followed by MinWax penetrating stain. Natural 209, Golden Oak 210B (redder) and Puritan Pine 218 are all the vintage amber wheelhouse depending on the wood.

    You can clear gloss lacquer it and get a factory appearing finish. Another option is MinWax Wipe-on Poly. You can get a soft gloss with the satin or a hard gloss with the ... gloss. It is a no brainer to apply and just takes a little patience as the finish is water thin and takes multiple coats. I posted a video here somewhere that shows me scuff sanding, tacking and applying a flawless coat of satin to a gunstock in all of 2 minutes and 18 seconds start to finish. Dry time between coats is an hour. The gloss is just as easy but because the coats are thin, there's no hiding bad prep under a mirror gloss. Here's a pic of a gunstock I recently refinished. No defects, no lap marks, nada and so easy.

    Before:

    pix823504429.jpg

    After:

    IMG_3933[1].jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2021
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