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Squaring lumber without a jointer

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by newuser1, Jan 28, 2021.

  1. newuser1

    newuser1 Tele-Holic

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    With the ongoing pandemic I've lost access to a wood shop where I was using a jointer, wide planer, and a drum sander.

    I have a 13" planer, and I can live without the drum sander even though it's nice to have one. The problem is the lack of jointer. I have lots of neck blanks that are about 13/16" thick and fretboard blanks that 1/4" that have moved and are no longer square.

    I found this 8" jointer that costs about $700 Canadian, but I kind of don't want to spend that much on a tool.

    https://federatedtool.com/king-kc-8hjc-8-benchtop-jointer-with-helical-cutterhead/

    Anybody here squaring their lumber without a jointer? If yes how do you do it?
     
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  2. Peegoo

    Peegoo Poster Extraordinaire

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    Put an 80TPI carbide blade in your table saw; it will make mirror-like edges on your blanks.

    This assumes you have tram'd your saw (blade and fence) to perfection so it reliably cuts at 90 degrees.
     
  3. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    I don't own a jointer, planer or drum sander. I mostly use hand tools - planes and shooting boards, occasionally my router, to square up pieces. Once in a while I'll take top and backs to a friend with a cabinet shop to run thru his belt sander, but I still join them with hand planes. In fact last summer my personal build challenge was to built an acoustic with hand tools (I did resort to my drill press for a couple of things).
     
  4. Mark the Moose

    Mark the Moose Tele-Afflicted

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  5. Steve Holt

    Steve Holt Friend of Leo's

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    I've seen your builds and I'm stunned by this news.
     
  6. Sweet Lou 275

    Sweet Lou 275 Tele-Meister

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    I probably won't explain this right, but I'll try. I usually use a table saw. Can't afford a joiner either. I set my blade high enough that it will cut through both pieces of the body in one pass. I put the edges to be joined to the blade. One half of the body I place top up, the other half I place top down on top of the other body piece. Any variance from 90 degrees in your blade will mirrored in both pieces. You might not be perfectly square, but the resulting joint should glue just fine. Only times I've had issue is when I use a thin enough kerf blade that it can actually move within the cut.

    Also a great method. Takes a little practice, but worth knowing how to do it.
     
  7. hnryclay

    hnryclay Tele-Meister

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    Hand planes, work bench. I dont ise a jointer for space considerations. I do use a thicknessing lunch box style planer to size boards, after jointing amd flattening with my planes. Once you get the hang of it its faster than dragging out a jointer, attaching it to the dist collector, and setting it up. I use a converted Stanley no 5 as a scrub plane, than a NO.5 jack to true it up, followed by a NO 7 for the last few passes.
     
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  8. trapdoor2

    trapdoor2 Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    Hand plane, vise, shooting board.

    I usually do this with a 1902 #4 Stanley and a #7 (I have a #8 but it is really too long for jointing bodies).

    I have a Jet cabinet jointer but I prefer the quiet of a handplane.
     
  9. newuser1

    newuser1 Tele-Holic

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    For those of you that use hand planes what planes do you recommend? When I check Lee Valley for the cost of 2 hand planes I can buy an 8" power jointer, so this gives me a pause. Are there any good plane brands/models that are reasonably prices, or should I look for used older models?
     
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  10. hnryclay

    hnryclay Tele-Meister

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    1900-1950 Stanleys, Millers Falls, and Sargents. Stay away from the newer versions of all 3. Lee Valley's Veritas planes are very nice, as are Lie Nielson, but they are very expensive. You will also need a sharpening system. They are not cheaper than an electric jointer, but they will last forever, are quiet and are safer. Some people like the WoodCraft Wood River planes. I enjoy working by hand, and prefer it for moat operations except ripping boards.
     
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  11. RobRiggs

    RobRiggs Tele-Meister

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    I’ve got a great collection of vintage Stanley and Record planes that I’ve found at garage sales and junk shops for very little cash. Restoring them and learning the techniques for sharpening and using them has been very rewarding
     
  12. pavel

    pavel Tele-Meister Ad Free Member

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    +1 on hand planes.
    I don't have a jointer, planer or a drum sander, can't fit them in my workspace. I use my table saw a router thicknessing jig or safe-T planer to get close then finish with hand planes.
    I'm definitely still working on my skills but jointing with a hand plane and getting invisible glue lines with hand tools is super rewarding.
     
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  13. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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  14. trapdoor2

    trapdoor2 Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    As has been said above. The Lie-Nielson and Lee Valley planes are crazy expensive. If you have the skills to do basic restoration, sharpening, etc., a used Stanley #4 is probably the perfect starter plane...and fully capable of doing the job. A #5 would also be excellent (and maybe cheaper). You'll find them at garage sales, flea markets, trunk/boot sales, etc. Fun to go hunting and prices are usually low for otherwise scabby and dirty planes.

    On ebay, $40-$100 or thereabouts for a #4.

    Planes require tuning and practice. Gee, that sounds familiar...

    I really like this guy's channel on youtube:

     
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  15. Colt W. Knight

    Colt W. Knight Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I don't plan to give up my 8" jointer anytime, but hand planes are exceptionally handy when building guitars. They can finesse things big machines have trouble with, and sometimes a quick swipe or two with a plane is all you need.
     
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  16. hnryclay

    hnryclay Tele-Meister

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    You also get the advantage of a sharp plane to finish boards instead of sanding. Less dust, looks great, a closed throat on a plane followed by a scrapper will provide a great finished surface.
     
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  17. Slowtwitch

    Slowtwitch Tele-Holic

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    Router with a flush cut bit against a straight edge

    That's what I use for body blanks and pretty anything else requiring to be jointed.

    Stick a piece of sandpaper to a off-cut piece of granite for a final run
     
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  18. Slowtwitch

    Slowtwitch Tele-Holic

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    He goes through a number of ways, good vid
     
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  19. Hobs

    Hobs Tele-Meister

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    You can do all the jointing for a guitar with a #5 plane. Very decent used Stanleys are on eBay for $65 or so.

    The Lie Nielson and Veritas planes are beautiful, functional, and of superb quality, but you don't need them.

    Definitely do not waste your money on new planes from China. The best of them are no better than a used vintage Stanley, and cost more. The cheaper ones are barely usable at all.
     
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  20. Ripthorn

    Ripthorn Friend of Leo's

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    I have a jointer, but just use it as a rough tool to get close, then use hand planes. If you don't want to sink the time in restoring them, a buddy of mine named Don Wilwol runs TimeTestedTools where he buys up older planes, gets them into good usable condition, and sells them for a very reasonable price. Or, if you are flat out crazy like I am, you go off and make your own infill planes, because why not?
     
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