Spray gun question

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by Rano Bass, Nov 21, 2014.

  1. Rano Bass

    Rano Bass Tele-Holic

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    What should be better to clean a spray gun, acetone or lacquer thinner?
    I use both and they work but i want to know which one is less harmful to the seals and parts.
    What do you guys use?
     
  2. funkymann1

    funkymann1 Tele-Holic

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    lacquer thinner is what the pros use..
    btw, Per our conversation...the purple one shoot clear amazingly! I'm gonna buy another!
     
  3. Rano Bass

    Rano Bass Tele-Holic

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    Lacquer thinner it is then, thanks!
    Yes that gun works great just needs a good cleaning before using it, being so cheap every once in a while you get a lemon but that's no problem.... just return it and get a new one :D
     
  4. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Lacquer thinner's composition includes acetone between about 20% and 75%, depending on the formula and quality. To get your gun as clean as possible, I'd use lacquer thinner, because some of the solvents in there (mainly methanol) help dry out any moisture that might try to accumulate from condensation as the thinner evaporates from the metal.

    Nothing in lacquer thinner will hurt the metallic parts of your gun, and the seals, etc. are expendable, not that you'd abuse them, but the most important thing is to make sure you've got a good, clean gun so you get the best finish you can, which means the best cleaning solvent you can use. O rings and seals are just too cheap to worry about them.
     
  5. Rano Bass

    Rano Bass Tele-Holic

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    Thanks, lacquer thinner seems to be the winner!
     
  6. Rhomco

    Rhomco Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    The Pros use

    MEK
     
  7. Rano Bass

    Rano Bass Tele-Holic

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    I don't remember seeing MEK around here..... does it have another name?
     
  8. TEAM LANDRETH

    TEAM LANDRETH Tele-Meister

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    Methyl Ethyl Ketone. It is the most solvent solvent on the planet. If you get it on your skin it will penetrate your blood stream in no time.
    It will clean anything off of anything. Read the OSHA stuff on MEK before you use it.
     
  9. Hopkins

    Hopkins Tele-Meister

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    Lacquer thinner for me. I have been using it for years with no problems, so why change.
     
  10. Rano Bass

    Rano Bass Tele-Holic

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    Looks pretty strong.......
     
  11. twick

    twick Tele-Meister

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    It depends on what paint youre using. For lacquer, thinner works well. For urethane acetone works best.


    Sent from my iPhone using TDPRI
     
  12. Rhomco

    Rhomco Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    Not so fast

    Not so fast...... read the MSDS Data Sheets and you will see they are both hazardous but Lacquer Thinner is a health hazard 3 (Severe) and MEK is hazard 2 (Moderate)
    Lacquer Thinner (HMIS Code 3 Serious Hazard)
    ROUTES OF EXPOSURE
    INHALATION of vapor or spray mist.
    EYE or SKIN contact with the product, vapor or spray mist.
    EFFECTS OF OVEREXPOSURE
    EYES: Irritation.
    SKIN: Prolonged or repeated exposure may cause irritation.
    INHALATION: Irritation of the upper respiratory system.
    May cause nervous system depression. Extreme overexposure may result in unconsciousness and possibly death.
    Prolonged overexposure to hazardous ingredients in Section 2 may cause adverse chronic effects to the following organs or systems:
    the liver
    the urinary system
    the hematopoietic (blood-forming) system
    the cardiovascular system
    the reproductive system
    SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF OVEREXPOSURE
    Headache, dizziness, nausea, and loss of coordination are indications of excessive exposure to vapors or spray mists.
    Redness and itching or burning sensation may indicate eye or excessive skin exposure.
    MEDICAL CONDITIONS AGGRAVATED BY EXPOSURE
    None generally recognized.
    CANCER INFORMATION
    For complete discussion of toxicology data refer to Section 11.

    MEK (HMIS Code 2 Moderate Hazard)
    ROUTES OF EXPOSURE
    INHALATION of vapor or spray mist.
    EYE or SKIN contact with the product, vapor or spray mist.
    EFFECTS OF OVEREXPOSURE
    EYES: Irritation.
    SKIN: Prolonged or repeated exposure may cause irritation.
    INHALATION: Irritation of the upper respiratory system.
    May cause nervous system depression. Extreme overexposure may result in unconsciousness and possibly death.
    Prolonged overexposure to hazardous ingredients in Section 2 may cause adverse chronic effects to the following organs or systems:
    the reproductive system
    SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF OVEREXPOSURE
    Headache, dizziness, nausea, and loss of coordination are indications of excessive exposure to vapors or spray mists.
    Redness and itching or burning sensation may indicate eye or excessive skin exposure.
    MEDICAL CONDITIONS AGGRAVATED BY EXPOSURE
    None generally recognized.
    CANCER INFORMATION
    For complete discussion of toxicology data refer to Section 11
     
  13. Veebus52

    Veebus52 Tele-Meister

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    Actually, MEK is the primary component in lacquer thinner along with acetone, methanol and possible some other things. Acetone and MEK are both in the chemical family of ketones. Acetone is more aggressive due to being a smaller molecule but also evaporates faster. Acetone and water mix completely in any ratio where MEK will not dissolve as much water. Lacquer thinner would be the best choice as far as the seals go. Acetone will dry faster and remove water better, but will put even more solvent into the air. I would go with lacquer thinner, but use either in very well ventilated areas with no open sources of ignition. Both are extremely flammable.

    I'm a chemist and I know these things.
     
  14. Rano Bass

    Rano Bass Tele-Holic

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    Thanks, good info!
     
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