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Spiral Bit Questions

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by GordonTeles, Jul 15, 2012.

  1. bubba105

    bubba105 Tele-Meister

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    I think you've got this backwards. Downhill routing is the easy, good routing technique. Uphill routing or climb cutting is the technique that gives so many people trouble. If you go around an entire body in one direction you will have no choice but to climb cut, every downhill cut has an uphill cut on both sides of it. I've been using a 2 " straight bit with the bearing on both ends for a while now, with good success. I haven't mentioned it here since I first bought the bit because unless you sand ON the line, as with a spiral bit, you'll eventually run into problems. I'm getting tired of all the "watching the line" sanding on the ROSS so I just bought a set of Robo-sanders that Preeb recommended a while back. They come tomorrow, I'll let you know.
     
  2. Shepherd

    Shepherd Friend of Leo's

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  3. Whozure

    Whozure Tele-Meister

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    It appears to me as if you are trying to take to much of a bite. Any router bit will grab and maybe throw the stock if you try to hog out too much at one time. I have over a dozen spiral bits in various sizes and use them for about any routing I do since I first used one.

    I buy most of my spiral bits from Onsrud because they are sharper and hold up better than most bits. They also have specialty bits for about any kind of routing one will ever do. They (Onsrud) have a spiral finishing bit and a spiral bit for routing acrylics that do a fantastic job.
     
  4. bubba105

    bubba105 Tele-Meister

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    Wow, I forgot all about that thread. I also forgot that I already have a Robo-sander. I put it away because my old drill press didn't have enough power to keep the thing spinning when I applied pressure. I'm going to need some luck finding it in the disaster area/shop. I just bought the 3 pack of Robo-sanders & now I have a nice big floor model drill press to spin them on. We'll see...
     
  5. mlp-mx6

    mlp-mx6 Tele-Holic

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    If you do not already have a rubber cleaning stick for sandpaper you will *definitely* need one for the Robo Sander. Do not wait until you have (waaaay too quickly) ruined your sanding sleeves to get the cleaning stick. Please, learn from my earlier ignorance.
     
  6. CapnCrunch

    CapnCrunch Friend of Leo's

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    Climb routing has nothing at all to do with whether you are going "uphill" or "downhill". It describes the action of moving your work piece in the same direction that the moving cutter head is spinning. It is so named because the router bit will want to climb right along the edge of your work piece. Sometimes very quickly and very violently.

    For safe work with a router, you want to move your work piece against the the rotation of the cutter. There are times when you may want to "climb" cut, but you have to know the risk and you have to take very light cuts. Climb routing should be avoided by folks who have never used a router. Basically, if you don't know what it is, you shouldn't be doing it. That's the irony. How do you know what to avoid, when you don't know what it is?:)
     
  7. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    When using a spiral bit (or a straight flute bit) there is no rule that says your bearing must come in contact with your template on the first pass. If you haven't cut as close to the line as you would when using a planer, it's perfectly safe to shave a bit off each time around the body.

    Might take 4 or 5 times around the work piece before the last pass has the bearing touching the template. This is realising the tool's limitations and working with this limit - not against it. Only a fool thinks they control a powertool ... you are only ever its guide. Don't disrespect it or ask it to do too much and it'll thank you for your patience and gentle approach by leaving a surface that requires much less work. And it'll stay sharper, longer because overheating is the death of a sharp edge.

    Jam a piece of wood at it and it'll throw it across the workshop in disgust.
     
  8. bubba105

    bubba105 Tele-Meister

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    You're right, I should have differentiated between the two. Both are techniques I don't use, I kind of think of them as one. I've lost good wood using them in the past, not anymore.
     
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