Sorting body cracks & filled screw hole - advice please.

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by PeterUK, May 30, 2020.

  1. PeterUK

    PeterUK Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    It's been a wonderful few days weather-wise and I've been using the opportunity to finish my Telemaster body.

    It's been sanded as 'smooth as a baby's ....." a 3 layers of sanding sealer and I'm about to layer on my fifth layer of primer.

    It's drying really quickly and between primer coats I've spotted two known faults which I thought I'd addressed.

    The first is a plugged screw hole where the plug has sunk and it's going to show through the final finish. I had used a [Peavy] string bar in the dry assembly which I was on the fence about so I filled the screw holes to give me the option of using regular ferrules. If it looks ugly/obvious when the final black finish is on, I'll simply refit the string bar.

    The more challenging problem is cracks in the body. This was known defect in the body before I started but despite running CA into all the known cracks, I have two rather obvious ones which either need filling or ignoring.

    But how to fill at this stage. More CA?

    Suggestions appreciated for the cracks and the sunken screw plug.

    Thanks in advance. :)
     

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  2. PeterUK

    PeterUK Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Update: I found a filler which the buyers (generally car restorers) are raving about particular those working with nitrocellulose finishes.

    Unless someone screams in capitals 'NO, DON'T USE THAT' then that's my plan A. :)
     

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  3. Blue Bill

    Blue Bill Poster Extraordinaire

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    I so hate to say it, but the reality is, there's often no way to stop a piece of wood from cracking, once it has started, and if it is prone to continue. I'm guessing this is exactly not what you want to hear. You can try fillers, and glues, and they may work, but don't be surprised if they don't. Screw dents can be drop-filled with Bondo or epoxy, then sanded smooth. You may be able to sand them without sanding through your primer coats, but maybe not. As with the crack, those dent areas may continue to become visible again, over time.

    I've been in your shoes, mate. I didn't want to believe, after I had put considerable work into a project, that I couldn't solve the problem with massive effort, and a symphony of glues and fillers. Now, I won't even try. Once a piece of wood starts to check, toss it and move on, is my motto.

    Of course, YMMV, good luck.
     
  4. PeterUK

    PeterUK Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Ha ha! Bill I'm totally relaxed. I paid very little for the body and I'm using this and various other low-cost bodies to practice and build my finishing skills.

    I'm going to try the filler but my expectations are indifferent.

    Thanks for your reply and advice. :)
     
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  5. eallen

    eallen Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I actually regularly fill wood cracks in body blanks and bodies. For bigger cracks, I use a 30 minute epoxy. Warm the crack area and epoxy for it to seep in better. For smaller ones, thin CA for it to penetrate into the crack, followed by medium CA to fill.

    Be aware that epoxy and CA are different hardness than wood so it is easy on fresh epoxy for it to actually sand faster leaving an indent.

    Eric
     
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  6. PeterUK

    PeterUK Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Thanks Eric. Great advice. :)
     
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  7. Texas Special

    Texas Special Tele-Meister

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    If you don't mind spending about £12. I'd suggest looking at zpoxy finishing resin. I've found it does a great job of stabilizing cracks and filling them. Also, doesn't seem to shrink. As a bonus, it's a great grain filler for your next project. Sands wonderfully.
     
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  8. telepraise

    telepraise Tele-Afflicted

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    +1 on bondo or industrial epoxy for the dent, they will work. The autobody product your looking at will probably do the trick as well since your doing an opaque paint. For the crack, I'd keep going with medium CA as it wicks in reasonably well and is your best bet for stabilizing the crack. Looking good BTW.
     
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  9. PeterUK

    PeterUK Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Quick update.

    I've filled the cracks with CA and allowed it to flow into cracks and crown above the cracks. I allowed it to dry for several hours bone hard.

    I've sanded the CA back to the bare wood and the cracks are barely visible, noticeable but very fine primer coloured - I was going to say cracks, but they are not cracks and smooth with the wood.

    I'm hoping that they are not visible when I re-primer the sanded areas.

    I filled that sunken plug with CA and sanded that flat and it's so, so smooth, so I expect that to be invisible once repainted.

    The pictures don't do it justice. I'll respray tomorrow. :)
     

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  10. telepraise

    telepraise Tele-Afflicted

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    Looking good! One thing I've found helpful in leveling drop fills is a small dead flat sanding block. With the hardness differential between cured CA or epoxy and wood, it's easy to sand away the surround wood, leaving the fill proud and things NOT flat. I use a small piece of 1/4" plate glass that I've had forever. It's easy to stick and peel off different grits of stickyback paper.
    epoxy filled.jpg
     
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  11. PeterUK

    PeterUK Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Where were you when I needed that great advice earlier! :lol:

    Thank you. What you've said makes perfect sense. :)
     
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