Songs full of "whoah oh whoah oh whoah oh oh whoah..."

sloppychops

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Nov 16, 2010
Posts
1,736
Location
wisconsin
For those of you saying this is nothing new, it's been around forever, yada yada, there's this (which has probably already been posted here, but WTH):
 

sloppychops

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Nov 16, 2010
Posts
1,736
Location
wisconsin
Advertising music in commercials normalizing the crap then it spills into pop.

Woah oh oh (stadium chant style)

or Woah oh oh (best day of my life style)

whistling (you're carefree..so spend money)

glockenspiel

kid piano notes

Clapping at a fast bpm so you'll get going on spending that money


But worse than that is the spreading of the use of the rising inflection for no linguistic purpose. Are they asking me a question?
Are they implying "if you will" or "have you heard that word before?".
It replaces a comma?

I heard someone say, "The other day, I bought a ticket for the train"

It comes out as "The other day? I bought a ticket?...for the train"? WTF
Speaking sentences as if they're questions when they're not is known as "upspeak." I can't stand that, either.
 

ScubaGeek

Tele-Meister
Joined
Jan 22, 2016
Posts
383
Location
Someplace called Ohio
The thing that drives me crazy is the Pat Metheny records where he's got a vocalist doing "wordless" vocals on a melody that's already being played by one of the other instruments. I never understood that. I mean, if he was writing lyrics (or had someone else writing) for a melody in a given piece, it would make sense, especially since tends to happen on some of his more, uh, "MOR" type things. But he literally just has a guy going "Woh, oh-woh" etc, and like I said, most of the time, ti's a melody that's already being played by the guitar, or the keyboards (or guitar synth, or "Synclavier guitar" or whatever).

But nothing beats Bob Dylan having these excellent guitarists playing on his record, and then he fills every nook and cranny with verse after verse after verse. It's like "You want to shut up already and let Bloomfield/Knopfler/Taylor play a solo already?!". I mean, I get it, he's one of the most genius lyricists of all time, but what's the point of having someone like Mike Bloomfield play on your record if you're not gonna give him a chance to solo? You got him playing stuff anyone in any garage band could do. And do some of those songs really need to be 7-11 minutes long? I mean, did Like A Rolling Stone really need to be 6 minutes long? Did Desolation Row really need to be 11 minutes long?
 

oregomike

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Mar 28, 2019
Posts
1,510
Location
Hood River, OR
Let me be frank: I can't stand this crap.

You know what I'm talking about, right? Songs that fill every available space with inane vocalizations. Usually it's "whoah oh whoah oh oh...whoah oh oh oh" or some idiotic variation on that. It typically sounds like there's several people vocalizing this pap.

I think it's a fairly recent development in "pop music," and seems to be the signature sound of music favored by millennials. All I can figure is that they couldn't come up with lyrics to fill the space, nor could they come up with interesting musical fills.

I can't think of any specific song to give as an example because I'm not lame enough to actually seek this crap out. However, I was was just subjected to about an hour of this garbage at work the other day and I had to vent.

Is it just me, or does this annoy anyone else?
Could be worse.

 

jrblue

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Nov 14, 2010
Posts
3,248
Location
Santa Barbara
You got him playing stuff anyone in any garage band could do.
I don't think this is true at all. The parts on many Dylan songs are incredible -- "Maggie's Farm" or "Subterranean..." are but two examples. There's incredible creativity and feel to those parts. As for solos, I've got to disagree there, too. I love guitar solos but don't know why we would look for that from Dylan. Riffs and parts, heck yeah. I can see why a person would be eager to hear what one of those guitarists would do in this setting, but that's not what the creator is trying to do or offer. He left that to others -- Jimi, Johnny.
 

NoTeleBob

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Feb 12, 2020
Posts
3,342
Location
Southwestern, USA
I don't think this is true at all. The parts on many Dylan songs are incredible -- "Maggie's Farm" or "Subterranean..." are but two examples. There's incredible creativity and feel to those parts. As for solos, I've got to disagree there, too. I love guitar solos but don't know why we would look for that from Dylan. Riffs and parts, heck yeah. I can see why a person would be eager to hear what one of those guitarists would do in this setting, but that's not what the creator is trying to do or offer. He left that to others -- Jimi, Johnny.

Agree. Dylan is more of a weave than a solo. No guitarist - especially the great ones - plays with Dylan and expects to be soloing.
 

Charlie Bernstein

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Apr 26, 2003
Posts
10,198
Location
Augusta, Maine
Agree. Dylan is more of a weave than a solo. No guitarist - especially the great ones - plays with Dylan and expects to be soloing.
And yet G.E. Smith says his favorite moment as a guitarist was the five years he spent as Dylan's lead player.

Likewise, Mike Bloomfield and Robbie Robertson, two more greats, were happy as pigs in Pacoima to back him up.

And Garcia* and Weir considered it a major coup when they got Dylan to do a tour with them.

The great ones don't have to solo.

----------

* Jerry said he loved playing Dylan songs because when you stand on a stage with a guitar around your neck in front of thousands of people you feel like a complete idiot, and singing a love song makes you feel like an even bigger idiot.
 

Charlie Bernstein

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Apr 26, 2003
Posts
10,198
Location
Augusta, Maine
Let me be frank: I can't stand this crap.

You know what I'm talking about, right? Songs that fill every available space with inane vocalizations. Usually it's "whoah oh whoah oh oh...whoah oh oh oh" or some idiotic variation on that. It typically sounds like there's several people vocalizing this pap.

I think it's a fairly recent development in "pop music," and seems to be the signature sound of music favored by millennials. All I can figure is that they couldn't come up with lyrics to fill the space, nor could they come up with interesting musical fills.

I can't think of any specific song to give as an example because I'm not lame enough to actually seek this crap out. However, I was was just subjected to about an hour of this garbage at work the other day and I had to vent.

Is it just me, or does this annoy anyone else?
I love Howlin' Wolf's "Ah-woo-hoooo" in "Smokestack Lightning."
 

NoTeleBob

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Feb 12, 2020
Posts
3,342
Location
Southwestern, USA
And yet G.E. Smith says his favorite moment as a guitarist was the five years he spent as Dylan's lead player.

Likewise, Mike Bloomfield and Robbie Robertson, two more greats, were happy as pigs in Pacoima to back him up.

And Garcia* and Weir considered it a major coup when they got Dylan to do a tour with them.

The great ones don't have to solo.

----------

* Jerry said he loved playing Dylan songs because when you stand on a stage with a guitar around your neck in front of thousands of people you feel like a complete idiot, and singing a love song makes you feel like an even bigger idiot.

Yep. Agreed. Steve Cropper is awesome and makes many of the songs he played on, but often there was no solo happening. Ronnie Wood is another guy who glues bands together but never needs to be the overboosted solo.
 




Top