Son in Motorcycle Accident

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Dep, Feb 18, 2016.

  1. sean79

    sean79 Poster Extraordinaire

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    So happy to hear he's okay - even with the wrecked bike and broken collarbone. It could have been a LOT worse. Gear helps - glad he was wearing it.
     
  2. Freejack

    Freejack Friend of Leo's

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    Probably should show it to all riders who don't wear gear actually, squids and pirates.

    Carl
     
  3. homesick345

    homesick345 Poster Extraordinaire

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    THank God your son is all right! Heartfelt compassion to you & your spouse

    I hope son will be extra careful in the future, & that he never gets into any accidents
     
  4. Ira7

    Ira7 Doctor of Teleocity

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    Best wishes that he's going to be okay.

    In South Florida where I am, deer are a non-issue. And even north, deer aren't usually considered a road danger.

    But what do I know?
     
  5. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Glad you were able to pull that one out, and I'm gonna say, thanks to the guys at BMW for designing a bike you can recover control of.

    We're talking about guys who choose the right helmet and so forth, but choosing the best engineered bike you can afford is good safety sense also.

    I have noticed, some folks who don't ride well, don't care what they ride, and those who do ride well, often ride a bike like yours. My girlfriend's Dad survived a pretty bad situation in Arkansas one time because his BMW gave him something to work with. Since the guy had nearly been killed by Third Reich artillery fire (Purple Heart) shortly after Normandy, you know he had to be thinking about the BMW for very practical (and surely not romantic) reasons.
     
  6. Paul in Colorado

    Paul in Colorado Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Glad your son is in as good shape as he is considering the possibilities.

    A tip. If you're going to hit an animal, aim for it's butt. They rarely turn around and change direction once they start moving. You might still hit it, but you'll probably do less damage.
     
  7. Tele1966

    Tele1966 Friend of Leo's

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    OP, thank goodness your son walked away from that accident.

    Nick, I relate to your post. I rode motorcycles as a kid, through HS and college. I rode exclusively all year without owning a car. Motorcycles were a big part of my life. I'd laid bikes down a few times and so when my son was born I swore off motorcycles because I wanted him to have a better chance of having a father growing up. And I didn't want my son to attain my love of motorcycles.

    One week after his 18th birthday I bought a bike. Since then I had an accident three years ago. A totaled bike and a visit to the trauma unit. Nice bonding opportunity's await fathers and sons in hospital trauma centers.

    I'm riding less these days.
     
  8. Colo Springs E

    Colo Springs E Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Glad the OP's son is okay!

    Music I'd never want to live without. I gave up riding a motorcycle 20ish years ago. I mostly just don't trust the other guy. But an example like this illustrates sometimes things are just out of your control. Heck, a blowout at 60mph could be catastrophic (never had a tire blow out on me on a bike back when I was riding, thankfully).

    For those of you who love them, I completely understand. I drive a small convertible, even that carries risks. But there's just too much that can go wrong riding a motorcycle for me to do it anymore. I'd be more inclined to go dirt biking than ride on the road.

    That said....

    Yes there is such a thing. Laid a little Honda Nighthawk down while taking a fairly sharp turn at 30-40mph once. Wearing a helmet but no other safety gear. I had very few scratches, and it scuffed the muffler, bent the handlebar slightly as well as the clutch pedal. That's it. So there are such thing as minor accidents on a motorcycle (though they may be rare).

    But.... IF I was gonna get a bike....

    Yes KevinB, like yours! Beautiful.
     
  9. HoodieMcFoodie

    HoodieMcFoodie Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I'd hazard a guess to say that chicken strips are bands of unworn tread on either side of the tyre, which are a result of not leaning the bike heavily through corners at speed.
    You'd get them from being "chicken" and not riding aggressively. NickJD may want to confirm this as, although I am Aussie, I'm not a motorcycle rider.

    Glad your son is on the mend, Dep.
     
  10. Freejack

    Freejack Friend of Leo's

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    That's correct. And if you slide your butt off the seat (and keep your bike more upright in corners), you can be even more aggressive and still have wider chicken strips than if you don't. When I'm at the track, I've gotten to zero chicken strips even on the front tire (and slid the back a touch), but in the mountains or otherwise riding, I generally have about 1/4" or so wide chicken strips on the rear. Pushing it to zero in the mountains and on public roads leaves you no way out and can lead you into the bushes or into oncoming traffic.

    I was coming from The Grand Tetons over the pass into Utah with my girlfriend on the back and I was quite surprised to see zero chicken strips when we stopped for lunch. With her on the back, I wasn't able to slide off the seat to keep the bike more upright in the corners. I absolutely toned it down a bit after that. You get used to being able to pop off the seat to gain control and options.

    Carl
     
  11. 6942

    6942 Poster Extraordinaire

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    When you lean your bike....HARD....into a tight turn, loose gravel is NOT your friend.

    Learned that when my old Honda 600 slid out from under me.
    The gas cap broke off, and the old girl went up in flames.
    Walked away from that one too, with only a broken zipper on my riding jacket.
    Lucky for sure!!

    Steve
     
  12. ItchyFingers

    ItchyFingers Tele-Afflicted

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    It's good that he is ok.
    I've gone down 5 times in a lifetime of riding.
    One was my fault. There is always the other driver and deer and turkeys and bear and moose and drunks and kids and men and women and they are all trying to get you. Drive accordingly.
    I have broken many bones but none from riding a motorcycle.
    Roads are far too crowded nowadays.
    Wear your gear and keep your head 100% in the game or you will pay the price.
     
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