Soldering Question

alanlorenzo

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Hello everyone -

My Stratocaster’s volume pot where the tremolo claw ground wire is soldered on top came undone.

I was going to just very quickly solder it back on but I noticed that some wire bits are in the solder blob on the casing.

When I resolder it do I need to get those pieces out or do they matter?

Thank you!
 

WalthamMoosical

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I don't think you absolutely need to get them out (unless they are long and hanging about), but they probably aren't doing any good either, and in an unlucky scenario could be a gremlin. In fact it may be that the wire from the claw broke near the solder blob and what you see is the former end of the wire. Get that claw wire soldered back into the blob; the extra bits of wire, don't worry too much.
 

Boreas

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Doesn't matter on any level other than appearance. If it bugs you wick it up, clean the area and make a new joint there. But nobody is going to see it so if it was me I'd leave it.

Also, cleaning it up may overheat and ruin the pot unless one is not careful. Although OP could file off the excess with the risk of getting solder dust in the workings...
 

eclecticsynergy

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Also, cleaning it up may overheat and ruin the pot...
▲ ▲ ▲ This. Pots will die if overcooked.

I was told it's better to keep a pot turned to zero when soldering on its casing.
The logic was that if any minor damage occurs, it won't be at a critical spot on the carbon.
Not sure if that's really true - IME if a pot gets damaged during soldering, it's done for.
Still, it can't hurt. So that's the way I do it.
 

Boreas

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▲ ▲ ▲ This. Pots will die if overcooked.

I was told it's better to keep a pot turned to zero when soldering on its casing.
The logic was that if any minor damage occurs, it won't be at a critical spot on the carbon.
Not sure if that's really true - IME if a pot gets damaged during soldering, it's done for.
Still, it can't hurt. So that's the way I do it.
Agree. Many newbies to soldering use pointed iron tips. These aren't great for soldering blobs on the back of pot cases because of the slow heat transfer. One would think this would make it safer, but it just keeps the case hot LONGER which is what ends up cooking the components. I use a well-tinned chisel tip for everything for quicker heat transfer.
 




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