Soldering in turret holes - lead length?

Discussion in 'Shock Brother's DIY Amps' started by itsGiusto, Sep 23, 2020.

  1. itsGiusto

    itsGiusto Tele-Meister

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    Is there a recommended lead length for when you're soldering into the holes at the top of turrets? Is there such a thing as "too long"? I'm just trying to preempt issues.

    Don't know if maybe the length of the lead hanging down into the turret isn't cut short enough, maybe there could be vibration, causing microphonics of the leads vibrating against the inside of the turrets, etc, or some other wacky issue that might come up.

    For clarity here, I've never heard anything about this, and don't know if there's any guidance on this. I'm just wondering if anyone else has ever heard or experienced something about it. Tell me I'm crazy to worry about this, and I'll stop worrying.
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2020
  2. hepular

    hepular Tele-Meister

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    i seem to have picked up that you don't want leads bottoming out against the chassis . . .
     
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  3. andrewRneumann

    andrewRneumann Tele-Holic

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    I'm not sure what the right answer is, but I will say they are lot easier to remove if short. Less solder to melt. If the lead and solder go all the way down the turret, you've got to heat a lot more mass to get it all moving.
     
  4. King Fan

    King Fan Poster Extraordinaire

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    Leads from the top don't need to be all that long. Turrets heated sufficiently already tend to drink too much solder, and a long top tail could (I'm guessing) just wick solder downwards. I suspect the vibration thing is unlikely in any case.

    OTOH leads from the bottom (under board leads) want to be long enough (and stripped far enough) to stick out and wrap down a bit over the top. You want to prevent 'em falling out prior to soldering, and you want visual confirmation they're in place later.
     
  5. Lowerleftcoast

    Lowerleftcoast Friend of Leo's

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    Ok, already. I will make it official. You are definitely crazy. lol.

    Actually, I like your inquisitive nature. Keep asking questions.:cool:
    I don't think leads vibrating inside turrets would actually happen or be an issue.

    I did a cap job on a '63 Fender Concert amp. I found it had microphonic disc capacitors mounted on the board. I think those caps added to the Mojo of that amp. The Concert is a 2x6L6, 4x10 combo.
    Your question made me think perhaps allowing the cap leads to have a little space for vibrating with the combo cab might be a way to add Mojo. Of course on a high gain amp a microphonic part would be asking for trouble. Not all amps are high gain though. That '63 Concert is a very sweet sounding amp. It definitely has Mojo... that certain something that can't be explained. I am glad I did not replace those disc caps.
    Thanks for your question. It has given me some ideas.:)
     
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  6. dan40

    dan40 Tele-Afflicted

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    I like to make mine about a 1/4" when placing a component lead into a turret.
     
  7. SacDAve

    SacDAve Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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  8. jtcnj

    jtcnj Tele-Holic

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  9. ahiddentableau

    ahiddentableau Tele-Meister

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    I think the answer is in the second last imagine from the bottom in the middle right-hand cell. It says that inserting a component into the top holes of turrets is unaccceptable. Apparently it's better to use the wrap-around method while ensuring the leads are kinked slightly for stress relief.

    Personally, I wouldn't sweat it. As you say, our amps aren't going into space, and the top mount method has been working just fine in guitar amps for well over 50 years.
     
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  10. jtcnj

    jtcnj Tele-Holic

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    ^^^^^ +1
     
  11. David Barnett

    David Barnett Doctor of Teleocity

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    Enough to hold the component in place while you're soldering it.
     
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  12. printer2

    printer2 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Being the only rocket scientist here (ok it was only for half a year), rockets see a lot more vibration that our amps will see, even as a combo amp. We had a shaker table with a couple hp (don't think it was over 10 hp) motor running it. If the solder job was good the stressed point would be a couple wire diameters up from the solder. Mind youit also depends on the diameter of the hole as compared to the diameter of the wire. Alright, forget about overthinking things. It will be fine.
     
  13. Paul G.

    Paul G. Friend of Leo's

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    Leads that are too long will act as wicks. Their smaller mass will heat up more quickly than the turret, so the solder will flow downward. This means the turret becomes full of solder which means harder to make repairs later, and the possibility of random blobs of solder being created, especially if resoldering. About 3/16" to 1/4" seems fine to me.
     
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  14. Urshurak776

    Urshurak776 Tele-Holic

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    1/4" has always worked fine for the few I have done.
     
  15. printer2

    printer2 Poster Extraordinaire

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    The wire should not heat up more quickly, you are suppose to be heating the turret not the wire. Also if the wire does heat up and it wicks the solder down and the turret is not hot enough the solder will not stick to it and you will have a cold solder joint. Use the right tool for the job. If you use a soldering iron that is meant to do fine work on a circuit board you will have a harder time.
     
  16. janglemore

    janglemore TDPRI Member

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    What tip size and temperature do you guys use?
     
  17. dan40

    dan40 Tele-Afflicted

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    I use a 3mm or 5mm bevel tip in my Hakko 888. Either of these tips will heat a turret in just a few seconds when the tip is well tinned. A dry tip or a smaller pencil tip takes much longer to heat and increases the risk of damaging a component.
     
  18. printer2

    printer2 Poster Extraordinaire

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    A 140W soldering gun. Use 14 gauge house wire as a tip. Eventually the copper at the tip get used up and breaks. Pull out the Romex 14-2 and strip off a piece. Tin the end and away I go.
     
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