So the new Frontier is a Tacoma?

Jakedog

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My wife's oldest brother has had literally hundreds of pickup trucks over his lifetime, and cars too. He owned a body shop for almost fifty years and bought and sold cars and trucks almost daily. He bought a brand new 1996 Ford F-250 diesel, that he pulled the bed off of, and put a flat-bed on. When his younger brother died, they wanted a hefty price to carry his casket in a hurst from the funeral home down to the gravesite which was on the grounds. My brother-in-law said forget that we'll haul him down there on my flat-bed, and that's what we did. The pall bearers carried him out to the truck got him on the flat-bed and hauled him down to his resting place. They got him off the truck, and he had probably about the most unusual ride ever at the cemetery. My brother-in-law still owns that truck to this day.

PS:

Try that in your Corolla.
That’s amazing. I’ve always said the funeral business is a racket, that preys on and exploits the bereaved. I’ll never participate in it. Good to see somebody get one over on those crooks.

That said, you can totally do that in a Corolla. I’ve seen it done many times on a Harley. You just have to cook the the subject really well before transport.
 

Sax-son

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I was the dog-man. Somewhere in time, me, old Scout and Buddy are up in the high country hoping to catch a bobcat, or maybe even get after a bear. It's a good night for hunting, I wish I were up there again. I know that time is passed though.

That had to be a while ago. Times have changed and there was a guy here who killed a bear and 2 cubs a few years back and he was literally run out of town. The wildlife is cherished in this community and unless it's for personal safety reasons, you can be persona non grata in a nano second.
 

Toto'sDad

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That had to be a while ago. Times have changed and there was a guy here who killed a bear and 2 cubs a few years back and he was literally run out of town. The wildlife is cherished in this community and unless it's for personal safety reasons, you can be persona non grata in a nano second.

I know that full well. I haven't hunted since the 70s. The world was different then. Some think it's better now, some don't. I feel no guilt, nor will I accept any for what I've done, it used to be a way of life for many. Hunting was a rite of passage for young men in my day. They used to have a big annual hounds-man trade day, with water races over around your neck of the woods many, many years ago. Lots of things have changed since then. I once pulled a guy off of a hunt I took him on because he was going to shoot up a tree. I stopped him and looked carefully above the bear in the tree, and the momma had two cubs up above her. The guy got pretty mad at me, but it was my dogs, and my tree. I never killed any cubs, or knowingly their mommas. I've related this same story on this forum before, so I'm not making it up to fit the response.
 

Sax-son

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I know that full well. I haven't hunted since the 70s. The world was different then. Some think it's better now, some don't. I feel no guilt, nor will I accept any for what I've done, it used to be a way of life for many. Hunting was a rite of passage for young men in my day. They used to have a big annual hounds-man trade day, with water races over around your neck of the woods many, many years ago. Lots of things have changed since then. I once pulled a guy off of a hunt I took him on because he was going to shoot up a tree. I stopped him and looked carefully above the bear in the tree, and the momma had two cubs up above her. The guy got pretty mad at me, but it was my dogs, and my tree. I never killed any cubs, or knowingly their mommas. I've related this same story on this forum before, so I'm not making it up to fit the response.

Not trying to make you feel guilty as we were all around hunting trips and hunting seasons back in those days. My uncle was an avid hunter and would often take me along on trips back in the 1950's. Looking back at that era, I am constantly perplexed on why he liked to hunt. He was such an animal person, that I can't figure it out on a personal level. However, on one such trip, I had such a traumatic childhood experience, that I vowed to never kill another animal as long as I lived and held true to that vow. I gave away all of my rifles and handguns as I felt I didn't need them anymore. In some ways, I felt as I was given a gift as my belief is that every creature deserves to live so long as they are not praying on pets or putting people's lives at risk. I find that I am not alone in that belief as many I know feel the same way.

I know that I cannot judge those who like hunting, but I cannot figure out what is really the joy in doing it. Yes, being part of an outdoor experience can be very adventurous, but why base it around the idea of killing something. It seems like such a waste to me. I guess it is something I will never understand, and I feel I am living in the right community that respects it. Many times, these animals are carrying disease and I would never consider eating it in the first place.
 

Jakedog

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Not trying to make you feel guilty as we were all around hunting trips and hunting seasons back in those days. My uncle was an avid hunter and would often take me along on trips back in the 1950's. Looking back at that era, I am constantly perplexed on why he liked to hunt. He was such an animal person, that I can't figure it out on a personal level. However, on one such trip, I had such a traumatic childhood experience, that I vowed to never kill another animal as long as I lived and held true to that vow. I gave away all of my rifles and handguns as I felt I didn't need them anymore. In some ways, I felt as I was given a gift as my belief is that every creature deserves to live so long as they are not praying on pets or putting people's lives at risk. I find that I am not alone in that belief as many I know feel the same way.

I know that I cannot judge those who like hunting, but I cannot figure out what is really the joy in doing it. Yes, being part of an outdoor experience can be very adventurous, but why base it around the idea of killing something. It seems like such a waste to me. I guess it is something I will never understand, and I feel I am living in the right community that respects it. Many times, these animals are carrying disease and I would never consider eating it in the first place.
I grew up hunting. It’s what we did. For some reason it never seemed crossways with my love of animals. It’s just how we did things. Mostly deer. But I also used to hunt rabbits for pocket money. Down in central Texas in the 80’s and early 90’s.

The Jack rabbit population would get crazy out of control. Part of the fallout of predators being hunted almost out of existence in earlier decades. Same deal with the deer. But anyhow- Jack rabbits are big, and they have crazy fast metabolisms. Three adult Jack rabbits can eat as much as a full grown cow in a day. You get thousands of Jack rabbits running all over a ranch, and they’ll starve cattle out over a winter. Cattle is money. They feed regular people burgers and steaks, but they literally keep food on the rancher’s table and clothes on their backs.

When I was a kid growing up there, you could get a dollar or two per head (depending on how bad the problem was) for every dead one you turned in to the rancher who owned the property. There were some weekends me and a couple friends made some serious money. All it cost was a little gas to get out to the country, and $5 for a full brick of .22 LR ammo. It was good business.

I moved away, learned some things, understood some others better, and grew up a lot. I haven’t hunted in a quite a while. Don’t see myself doing it again unless it’s a necessary survival situation. Which doesn’t seem likely. Like @Toto'sDad, I don’t regret it, and I don’t harbor any guilty feelings. But neither do I see a legitimate reason to engage in such activities at this point in my life.
 

getbent

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ummm. same as it ever was.
 

Whatizitman

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We have a massive overpopulation of deer in my area. Well, in my yard, at least. Despite the amount of hunting that occurs here, I suspect that if even a small percentage was sustenance first and foremost, there wouldn't be nearly the amount of deer. But there's no sport. So there's no kill. That's how I see it, anyway. It's the only thing that make sense. We have a very popular and widely publicized annual "deer season" here. Yet, the deer are so accustomed to human presence that they rarely sprint away, unless you try to say hi in a loud voice or whatever. At a local state park with a small reservoir, I lost count of how many I saw grazing in an open field adjacent to the camp ground. Not exactly a herd worried about being shot at anytime soon. Sheesh.

And they carry ticks.... If I enjoyed killing animals, deer would be top of my list. But I don't. And they are beautiful and graceful. No way I could ever shoot one.

Where was I? Oh yeah. I like tacomas. I've pretty much made up my mind I will never buy one, though. Or really, their cost made the decision for me. Not worth the huge monthly payments for the occasional "woohoo, I'm in a truck!" moments.

I'm done. Time to leave work. :)
 

telemnemonics

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That’s amazing. I’ve always said the funeral business is a racket, that preys on and exploits the bereaved. I’ll never participate in it. Good to see somebody get one over on those crooks.

That said, you can totally do that in a Corolla. I’ve seen it done many times on a Harley. You just have to cook the the subject really well before transport.

Yeah these days well done is, well, you know...

I think I paid something over $1000 to have my Mom popped in the ol' wood stove and I was there for that so I know there's no secret sauce or magic involved.
Not classy to discuss?
Yeah well...
 

Toto'sDad

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Not trying to make you feel guilty as we were all around hunting trips and hunting seasons back in those days. My uncle was an avid hunter and would often take me along on trips back in the 1950's. Looking back at that era, I am constantly perplexed on why he liked to hunt. He was such an animal person, that I can't figure it out on a personal level. However, on one such trip, I had such a traumatic childhood experience, that I vowed to never kill another animal as long as I lived and held true to that vow. I gave away all of my rifles and handguns as I felt I didn't need them anymore. In some ways, I felt as I was given a gift as my belief is that every creature deserves to live so long as they are not praying on pets or putting people's lives at risk. I find that I am not alone in that belief as many I know feel the same way.

I know that I cannot judge those who like hunting, but I cannot figure out what is really the joy in doing it. Yes, being part of an outdoor experience can be very adventurous, but why base it around the idea of killing something. It seems like such a waste to me. I guess it is something I will never understand, and I feel I am living in the right community that respects it. Many times, these animals are carrying disease and I would never consider eating it in the first place.

I've been out most of the afternoon, and then when I came home it was time to take Alex for a walk, just now saw this. Jakedog kind of sums up how I feel about hunting. I no longer hunt, at least with hounds, I went on a few deer hunts with my oldest son before he passed, and I treasure our time in the woods together. Again, no apologies from me on my hunting.

Back in the days that I hunted with hounds the training of the hounds was where most of the enjoyment lay. Training a dog to do what you want him to, without him being within your sight is no easy proposition. It's a lot like golf, only a very few who hunted with hounds ever really got any good at it. Most of the guys who had dogs, just had dogs, they never caught anything. Flatland hunting with coon dogs, is an altogether different proposition. Coon hunting never interested me. It was bear and cat hunting I liked.

I love animals but somehow was able to compartmentalize in my mind wild animals, and pets. What people don't understand doing, they usually don't want anyone else to do either. That's just human nature, I'm not angry with them, I'm just glad I got to do the things I did before they became controversial. I had a lot of adventures along my life's highway, I'm not sorry for any of it, and I'm just glad I got to do all the things that I did.
 
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Toto'sDad

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That’s amazing. I’ve always said the funeral business is a racket, that preys on and exploits the bereaved. I’ll never participate in it. Good to see somebody get one over on those crooks.

That said, you can totally do that in a Corolla. I’ve seen it done many times on a Harley. You just have to cook the the subject really well before transport.

This was a full-blown casket. When my brother-in-law first proposed that HE haul the casket, they tried to convince him that it was illegal to do so. He asked them to show him the law, when they couldn't produce any facts to support their position, they relented and let him transport the casket. Before the funeral, he took the truck out to his shop, and him and his guys really detailed it to the 9s. I have been to a lot of funerals; I've never been to one quite like that one.

This was back in 2002 in May. Seventeen days later, another of my wife's brothers died over in Arizona, and most of the family went over there for that funeral. My wife's family had avoided death save for their mom and dad for many years. There had been nine kids, now there were seven, today there are only four left. What a gang of us there were when we all were alive and well, and there were kids galore. We had so many great times together.
 

tcadam

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I'll be in the market for a Tacoma early this Spring. I used to have a '91 Ranger Custom that I just loved but I had to trade it in when kids came along. Anyway, now that we're empty nesters and don't need a "family car" as much anymore, I'd like to replace it. Looking online, I can get one with the 6' bed for a little over 30k as long as I behave myself as far as options go.
 

Guitharley

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Grew up in the country on a little farm where pickups were the norm for sure.....have ran some kinda 4 wheel drive for most ever due to living in the snow belt...and the strong desire to go where I shouldn't go

Had a Tacoma and decided a few years ago I would trade for new before I retired to have it payed off at retirement...fully expected to go with another Tacoma BUT....dont laugh now...went Ridgeline and I really like the vehicle.
Sure its not as trucky looking, but it can hold a lot more gear and rides like a dream...if I were to replace it today it would be with another.

I know they are not real popular with the truck crowd but i don't care....and I got over the "go where I shouldn't go mentality" a while back so really not using it as a bush truck or such, just my everyday driver
 

Whatizitman

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Grew up in the country on a little farm where pickups were the norm for sure.....have ran some kinda 4 wheel drive for most ever due to living in the snow belt...and the strong desire to go where I shouldn't go

Had a Tacoma and decided a few years ago I would trade for new before I retired to have it payed off at retirement...fully expected to go with another Tacoma BUT....dont laugh now...went Ridgeline and I really like the vehicle.
Sure its not as trucky looking, but it can hold a lot more gear and rides like a dream...if I were to replace it today it would be with another.

I know they are not real popular with the truck crowd but i don't care....and I got over the "go where I shouldn't go mentality" a while back so really not using it as a bush truck or such, just my everyday driver

I get it. The higher the costs go with truly off-roadable vehicles, the less inclined I feel to purchase something so expensive that will just get banged up doing what it’s designed to do. And even the most capable vehicles are not immune from poorly judged maneuvers or obstacles, and/or leaving stranded miles from nowhere.

As a wise old Idaho farmer once told me, 4wd only gets you twice as stuck, twice as far in, and twice as deep.

Nothing wrong with means reduction, which is where I am the older and grumpier I get. A less “capable” car is not only cheaper, but helps keep dumb decisions to a minimum.
 

Lochry

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I’m a fan of the 2nd gen tacomas. Had a 2001 for years until the dreaded frame rot got it. Replaced it last year with a 2002. My son found an unused oem frame in Tennessee so this spring we intend to resurrect the 2001. Gonna be an intense but fun couple of days.
 

Chester P Squier

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Automakers are plagarizing what works in the marketplace. So something big and rugged, even if it’s only rugged looking, increases the odds of success in the off road market. There’s not much of that where I live unless you count beach erosion as a legitimate off road market but monster trucks rule the roads at 75 or 80 mph scaring the crap out of other drivers. The ability to intimidate sells trucks. RAM takes it one step farther with loud pipes that make a Harley sound like your father’s Oldsmobile.

most all cars and trucks look alike to me
is that a buick or a toyota? a kia or a honda?......

play music!

Shortly after we bought our CRV in 2018, we found that every new car on the road is a white SUV. Ours was hard to find in a parking lot. We found a sticker to put on it so we would know which car is ours.
 

Kandinskyesque

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I got this in October.
A Mitsubishi L200 Series 3 (K74) from 2003. aka the "Triton" in Aus but no idea if there's a US version.

After years of family saloons and SUVs, it's far more appropriate to where I moved a few years ago.
New chassis, engine, respray.....basically a nut and bolt rebuild by a guy in England who specialises in rescuing and rebuilding these particular models.
I've just ordered a 4 in row seat for the cab to ferry 4 grandkids.

I haven't driven it much yet but 'long illness' coming to an end so I'm sure it will be getting plenty use in the coming years; hopefully there's another 18 years of life in it, if I keep our local breed of tin worm at bay.

I've a 200 years old house to renovate; our rural roads are appalling; it also allows me to access the commercial forestry roads where we are allowed to take their 'wastage' for fuel; and also when health/circumstances allow, I'll get my PA and guitars in the back for gigging.
There is also the camping and fishing trips to look forward to.

So I think entirely appropriate for my circumstances. I'd never think of owning one of these if I was still living in the urban sprawl.

Priorities first though, it's only got a cassette player and the FM radio signal is non existent around here so I'm shopping for a decent sound system. Also a decent roof rack for trips to the saw mill.
Then of course, I'm going to need somewhere to plug an amp in the truck bed for a spot of 'sheep worrying'.

I might have just acquired a new variant of GAS!

That's a typical day's weather at Loch Lomond in the picture.
 




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