So the new Frontier is a Tacoma?

Toto'sDad

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During the winter of 1977, we had a record-breaking windstorm here in the central valley. This was at the end of my hunting days, and I still had a large Ford 4WD pickup. I had a lot of hunting stuff, and provisions stowed on board. The thing with having, and using a rig like that, it really does increase your confidence in being able to handle whatever comes at you, because you literally have to deal with a lot of situations in the mountains, as a dog-man hunter.

Anyway, when the storm hit, people were afraid to drive, or even get outside. The wind was up around 70mph when I decided to go get my kids at school, because I knew nobody would know how to handle the situation at school, since it had never come up. I rounded up my son, then my daughter, and brought them home. I set about hanging quilts over the windows and spraying them down with water to keep the dust down. I put my wife and son to filling everything available with water in case the water was shut down. After we filled all the jugs and pans, I turned off the water, and gas. Left the electricity on.

I then went over and got my wife's brother, and his wife and kids since he was disabled, and brought them to our place. (2 trips in the truck) I got some coverings over the window facing the wind and tied everything I could down with some rope and rebar dead man stakes I had. Just as I was tying down the patio cover, my wife stuck her head out the back door and hollered they're saying on the radio the wind is up to 115mph! About that time, the wind gusted, and the patio cover went right on over the house into the road out front. It would eventually end up in a neighbor's yard down the road from us.

My wife ran clear to the back bedroom and was hiding there when I found her. I told her she was okay, that the patio cover could be replaced and to go on back in the living room with the family. I went back out and finished tying down my sheds, and fences, and ended up in pretty good shape when the storm abetted in about thirty-six hours.

The thing is, when you have a truck, you end up doing things you never thought of being just a regular car owner, and that confidence extends into your whole life. I'm a bit of a wuss now, but in my day, I could usually handle what came way, and I was usually driving either a pickup truck, or a large car big rig.
 

arlum

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Maybe truck manufacturers should do what guitar manufacturers started doing. Recreate those special models from certain years in the past, offer them with period correct appointments and, just for good measure relic a few of them. Example ..... Ford F100 models. The '53,'62 and '70 years. The Custom Shop '53s come with two bales of hay in the bed and replica cow flop embedded in the tire treads. Tree branch scratches along the sides, fender dings, etc. are optional. The '70 includes period correct Playboy mud flaps. I can see some of my boomer buddies going ape **** over these models. Why spend the $$$ for true vintage when the Ford Custom Shop, working from the, (lost but recently found), original design prints, has produced the Historic series of reissues.
 

Mechanic

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Wow this was a great read.
My 1st truck was a ‘55 F100 that carried dirt bikes and surf boards. This was my 1st car/truck. I then did the van craze for the next few decades as I now had a family to care for. My next truck was a ‘84 C5 Jimmie that hauled kids to the ski slopes and camping and again hauled dirt bikes on a trailer. Kids moved out. Wife wanted something she didn’t have to climb into. She got an S10 Blazer and I picked up a ‘90 Silverado extra cab 4x4. Drove that until ‘08 or so. 1st wife passed on me in that same year. Truck had 300k on the engine. Sold it and found a ‘94 Chevy shorty V6 4x4 with on 35K on it. Used it for hauling trash, engines for rebuild. Even made a couple of ski trip with the 4x4. ‘16 pulled drive train to change the clutch and my liver blew up. My son helped me with that this summer and it’s back on the road with 250k on it. Son is begging me for it now. I’d since bought a ‘16 Colorado with 70k on it. But use the ‘94 for dirty work and wheeling about in the south east of Utah. Just running 33” BFG kidders. My little ‘16 is used for picking clean parts and towing a small 20’ camp trailer.
Wife #2 is happy in her Subie Forester but we use the Colorado for travel and camping.
Everyone has they’re fav. A Chevy happens to be mine.
 

Happy Enchilada

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When Chevy first came out with the Colorado, a good friend in my 12 step recovery group bought one and I gave him a bunch of crap about how it wasn’t a REAL TRUCK, which we laughed about and he didn’t take seriously.
But a couple of months later he died of an OD, leaving wife and little girl behind.

Sad memory of making fun of other folks stuff...

Yeah with how ridiculously big “full size” is now, that’s pretty practical.
I think Dodge can be blamed for throwing gas on that war when the started putting tractor trailer big rig graphics on half ton pickups.
Remember that a half ton pickup is a small truck, the smallest “pickup truck” made and sold in America until Datsun.
When Dodge tried to make the little hobby half ton into a big rig, that war was on.
No offense meant to half ton pickups but they really were never serious work trucks. They had drive trains about like a station wagon and similar hauling capacity.
Great for families other vehicle if you needed to haul yard stuff but just not what Dodge faked them up to look like with the massive grilles and hood above fender like a Kenworth.


The Big 3 decided to kill off the small pickups all at about the same time several years ago. The Dodge Dakota, Ford Ranger, and Chevy Colorado disappeared. Then Chevy brought the Colorado back and sales were so great that Ford finally introduced a new Ranger, and now the even smaller Maverick. Maybe Dodge will resurrect the Dakota nameplate soon?

When I went shopping for a vehicle, I had driven a '99 Explorer Sport (2 door) for 16 years and roughly 200K miles. Highly capable, compact, and economical - and running great when I traded it in. Looked at Toyota - the Taco was just way too small for my body, and the 4 Runner drove like a school bus. Don't like Nissan so never considered it. Ranger was also very cramped inside and $10K more than the Colorado. Plus the 3.6L V6 in the Chevy runs like a scalded dog. It was a no-brainer.
 

archetype

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I really miss the old Ranger and Nissan trucks. Small, compact, sturdy, lasted forever, vinyl bench seats, rubber floors, five speed manuals, you know, a truck.

Same here. My late 70s Datsun long bed was a light weight, minimalist, real truck.
 

Jakedog

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During the winter of 1977, we had a record-breaking windstorm here in the central valley. This was at the end of my hunting days, and I still had a large Ford 4WD pickup. I had a lot of hunting stuff, and provisions stowed on board. The thing with having, and using a rig like that, it really does increase your confidence in being able to handle whatever comes at you, because you literally have to deal with a lot of situations in the mountains, as a dog-man hunter.

Anyway, when the storm hit, people were afraid to drive, or even get outside. The wind was up around 70mph when I decided to go get my kids at school, because I knew nobody would know how to handle the situation at school, since it had never come up. I rounded up my son, then my daughter, and brought them home. I set about hanging quilts over the windows and spraying them down with water to keep the dust down. I put my wife and son to filling everything available with water in case the water was shut down. After we filled all the jugs and pans, I turned off the water, and gas. Left the electricity on.

I then went over and got my wife's brother, and his wife and kids since he was disabled, and brought them to our place. (2 trips in the truck) I got some coverings over the window facing the wind and tied everything I could down with some rope and rebar dead man stakes I had. Just as I was tying down the patio cover, my wife stuck her head out the back door and hollered they're saying on the radio the wind is up to 115mph! About that time, the wind gusted, and the patio cover went right on over the house into the road out front. It would eventually end up in a neighbor's yard down the road from us.

My wife ran clear to the back bedroom and was hiding there when I found her. I told her she was okay, that the patio cover could be replaced and to go on back in the living room with the family. I went back out and finished tying down my sheds, and fences, and ended up in pretty good shape when the storm abetted in about thirty-six hours.

The thing is, when you have a truck, you end up doing things you never thought of being just a regular car owner, and that confidence extends into your whole life. I'm a bit of a wuss now, but in my day, I could usually handle what came way, and I was usually driving either a pickup truck, or a large car big rig.
So that’s a great story, but I gotta know- In all of your dog-man hunting, did you ever catch dog-man?
 

Jakedog

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The Big 3 decided to kill off the small pickups all at about the same time several years ago. The Dodge Dakota, Ford Ranger, and Chevy Colorado disappeared. Then Chevy brought the Colorado back and sales were so great that Ford finally introduced a new Ranger, and now the even smaller Maverick. Maybe Dodge will resurrect the Dakota nameplate soon?

When I went shopping for a vehicle, I had driven a '99 Explorer Sport (2 door) for 16 years and roughly 200K miles. Highly capable, compact, and economical - and running great when I traded it in. Looked at Toyota - the Taco was just way too small for my body, and the 4 Runner drove like a school bus. Don't like Nissan so never considered it. Ranger was also very cramped inside and $10K more than the Colorado. Plus the 3.6L V6 in the Chevy runs like a scalded dog. It was a no-brainer.
Interestingly enough, the Colorado and Dakota were never considered, or marketed as small trucks. They were both called “mid-size” trucks. The S10, Ranger, Nissan Hardbody, Tacoma, and what was the little Dodge? A D50 maybe? I don’t remember. Those were the compacts in the 80’s. Dodge came out with the Dakota as a bigger answer to the little pickup, without going full sized. Colorado came on the heels of Dakota’s success. The current crop of Colorado and Ranger trucks, and even Tacoma now, are freaking HUGE compared to the compact trucks of yesteryear. Full sized trucks have gotten completely stupid.
 

Toto'sDad

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So that’s a great story, but I gotta know- In all of your dog-man hunting, did you ever catch dog-man?

I was the dog-man. Somewhere in time, me, old Scout and Buddy are up in the high country hoping to catch a bobcat, or maybe even get after a bear. It's a good night for hunting, I wish I were up there again. I know that time is passed though.
 

tubedude

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Conversely, remember the Honda CVCC?
Those things were a joke!
Much of the idea behind the shall we say Japanese invasion car market was the cheap prices. That was about it, and they delivered in that.
Now?
Not really comparable product line, very different goals.
In the early seventies in Hawaii we had many imports. All cars are imported there really, as Detroit was twice as far as Japan, Korea etc.
The B series Datsuns were clogging up the roads, the early Mazdas were no better, but the Toyota Corolla was king. Cheap, reliable and had the acceleration the others only dreamed of.
 

telemnemonics

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In the early seventies in Hawaii we had many imports. All cars are imported there really, as Detroit was twice as far as Japan, Korea etc.
The B series Datsuns were clogging up the roads, the early Mazdas were no better, but the Toyota Corolla was king. Cheap, reliable and had the acceleration the others only dreamed of.

Makes sense that they got sold where they were needed, I do recall by the late '70s the SR5 was performance oriented, but for the most part here they were all considered economy cars bought for price.
The cute whatever it was that looked like a miniature Mustang fastback? Looked cool but I can't remember a single one owned by a hot rodder?
I vaguely remember magazine ads featuring the low price but no performance specs.
VW Beetles were getting souped up before the Japanese cars arrived, and I'm trying to think of any of the Japanese cars besides the Datsun pickups that got souped up or hot rodded?
When the first V6 Nissan Maxima appeared, the really small one, it quickly got a rep for being able to outrun police cars!
That was probably the '80s though?
My memory is regional, and Maine was maybe more old fashioned and tradition steeped.
For example Mainers raced rototillers.
Nuff said!
 

ping-ping-clicka

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WOW ! I'M IMPRESSED . The vehicle projects an image of strength and reliability.
Most if my life I've been a bike guy , bicycle (not vrooom vrooom) participant, as driving with others isn't a sport that I take to with any relish or mustard, but I think your truck is really cool and looking at the image I can imagine the benefit of this vehicle particularly in winter wet rainy slippery slope weather, roomy cab hauling space in the back, high ground clearance, you betcha'.
I hope that it is good on miles as my Dads long bed 61 Chey was.
 

ping-ping-clicka

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Makes sense that they got sold where they were needed, I do recall by the late '70s the SR5 was performance oriented, but for the most part here they were all considered economy cars bought for price.
The cute whatever it was that looked like a miniature Mustang fastback? Looked cool but I can't remember a single one owned by a hot rodder?
I vaguely remember magazine ads featuring the low price but no performance specs.
VW Beetles were getting souped up before the Japanese cars arrived, and I'm trying to think of any of the Japanese cars besides the Datsun pickups that got souped up or hot rodded?
When the first V6 Nissan Maxima appeared, the really small one, it quickly got a rep for being able to outrun police cars!
That was probably the '80s though?
My memory is regional, and Maine was maybe more old fashioned and tradition steeped.
For example Mainers raced rototillers.
Nuff said!

For example Mainers raced rototillers.:lol:
 

Jakedog

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Makes sense that they got sold where they were needed, I do recall by the late '70s the SR5 was performance oriented, but for the most part here they were all considered economy cars bought for price.
The cute whatever it was that looked like a miniature Mustang fastback? Looked cool but I can't remember a single one owned by a hot rodder?
I vaguely remember magazine ads featuring the low price but no performance specs.
VW Beetles were getting souped up before the Japanese cars arrived, and I'm trying to think of any of the Japanese cars besides the Datsun pickups that got souped up or hot rodded?
When the first V6 Nissan Maxima appeared, the really small one, it quickly got a rep for being able to outrun police cars!
That was probably the '80s though?
My memory is regional, and Maine was maybe more old fashioned and tradition steeped.
For example Mainers raced rototillers.
Nuff said!
You might be be forgetting the Datsun Z’s. Starting with the 240. They got popular early on, and are bringing real money these days.

C3EC86F7-69C0-4935-91E2-A3F70FEAADB8.jpeg
 

P Thought

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Datsun invented the disposable mini truck so Nissan really can’t steal it from a Toyota who stole it from Datsun.

When Datsun changed their name to Nissan I think many folks then sort of gave Toyota a senior status and treated Datsun/ Nissan as the new guy.

My first small pickup was a '66 Datsun. I bought it used in about '77.

Edit : (not to take up extra posts) I have loved every vehicle I've ever owned, that's cars, trucks, and motorcycles, even my riding lawnmower. I suspect a lot of you are thataway too.
 
Last edited:

telemnemonics

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You might be be forgetting the Datsun Z’s. Starting with the 240. They got popular early on, and are bringing real money these days.

Oh right of course!
But I had been negotiating the claim that Datsuns sucked, and recalled Datsun being both a generally reliable and enthusiast brand early on.
Probably saw 30 Datsun trucks for every Z early on too, but yeah the Z was cool and may be the only heavily collected and restored '70s Japanese car in these parts.
But again, after Datsun became Nissan it was like they were starting over and lost their good rep?
@tubedude said that was because Datsun was so terrible they had to change their name?
IDK anything about that claim, maybe they had a Pinto?

I mean the Pinto was terrible, the MGB was pretty bad, the Chevy Chevette was dismal yet carried folks, I've read revisionist claims that the Vega was terrible but those were lugging groceries, getting hot rodded and kept going well past their production.
Not that cars being popular for hot rodding means they were any good.

Then of course if you ask 100 people you will certainly be told that every car maker is both great and terrible.
 

bgmacaw

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The Big 3 decided to kill off the small pickups all at about the same time several years ago.

Small pickups became impractical/uneconomical to build in the US due to safety and fuel economy regs and small pickups made elsewhere in the world could not be imported economically to the US due to extremely high tariffs. The first may change due to EVs although the tariffs will continue to block imports.
 

tubedude

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Makes sense that they got sold where they were needed, I do recall by the late '70s the SR5 was performance oriented, but for the most part here they were all considered economy cars bought for price.
The cute whatever it was that looked like a miniature Mustang fastback? Looked cool but I can't remember a single one owned by a hot rodder?
I vaguely remember magazine ads featuring the low price but no performance specs.
VW Beetles were getting souped up before the Japanese cars arrived, and I'm trying to think of any of the Japanese cars besides the Datsun pickups that got souped up or hot rodded?
When the first V6 Nissan Maxima appeared, the really small one, it quickly got a rep for being able to outrun police cars!
That was probably the '80s though?
My memory is regional, and Maine was maybe more old fashioned and tradition steeped.
For example Mainers raced rototillers.
Nuff said!

I think the Mustangesque Toyota you are thinking of was an early Celica. My favorite copy was the Opel GT. A mini Corvette.
 

KyAnne

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I agree when I saw the new Nissans- I said the same thing- they copied Tacoma wheels, colors etc.
I bought a 2019 Frontier in November of '19. V6 261 HP. It's very "peppy", but a gas PIG in town. 16 mpg is common. 18 mpg combo hwy/city. 23 to 24+ mpg Interstate only depending how much I get to use the cruise control.
I like White Trucks and Cars!
 




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