So Intruiged...so confused (Deluxe Reverb??)

Discussion in 'Shock Brother's DIY Amps' started by joinpobob, Feb 10, 2009.

  1. joinpobob

    joinpobob Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    210
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2008
    Location:
    Gainesville
    I am really interested in building a Fender amp.
    I like the hot rod deluxes and the deluxe reverbs.
    What models are those. I think they are the 5e3 series. Is that right?
    Or, what do people mean when they refer to 5e3?

    I have been looking at parts and kits. Why are kits so expensive?
    I was planning on building my own cab, and I have a speaker that I want to use with it.

    How hard is it to work with tubes?
    Any other tips?

    Thanks. Sorry to be ignorant and ask stupid questions.
     
  2. Tim Armstrong

    Tim Armstrong Super Moderator Ad Free Member

    Age:
    60
    Posts:
    19,376
    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2003
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    Fender made amps called "Deluxe" pretty much from the start, and as time went by, all of their amps evolved. The 5E3 is a tweed Deluxe from the late 50s. The Deluxe Reverb was made from 1964-1982 (with some slight changes over that time), and again as the re-issue more recently (an amp based on the 1965 BF Deluxe Reverb, but with a less expensive build and some small circuit changes).

    Kits cost more than raw parts because there's a fair amount of expense and labor involved in putting one together!

    Tim
     
  3. aunchaki

    aunchaki Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,049
    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2006
    Location:
    Central New York
    5E3 refers to the circuit of a particular Fender amp model. The 5E3 is the Narrow-Panel Tweed Deluxe from the late 1950s. It is NOT the justly-famous blackface Deluxe Reverb of the 1960s (a much more complicated circuit and a very different-sounding amp).

    Check out the Fender Amp Field Guide for details of Fender amp circuits. The 5E3 is the "Narrow Panel Deluxe."


    Some of the parts are just expensive. A nice screenprinted 5E3 chassis will cost a bit. The transformers are high-cost items. Resistors, caps, pots and wire aren't too much. Building your own cab and providing your own speaker can save hundreds of dollars.


    There are SIGNIFICANT safety issues working with the capacitors found in tube amps. You need to learn how to safely drain the charge stored in the caps, or you might be seriously hurt (or killed). I don't have a good safety reference handy. Maybe somebody else will chime in.


    Go slow, don't be afraid to ask for help. The folk here on TDPRI are the best on the 'Net. Also, take pictures and start a thread here about your build, so others can help and learn!
     
  4. dangelico603

    dangelico603 Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    350
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2007
    Location:
    Oklahoma City
    What Tim said. The 5e3 is the circuit designation. The 5 means the circuit was designed in the fifties (6 is a sixties circuit) the 3 shows which amplifier model it is. Champ=1 Princeton=2 Deluxe=3 Super=4 Pro=5 Bassman=6 Bandmaster=7 Twin=8 etc... Then the letter shows which circuit it actually is eg 5c3 means it was a circuit designed in the fifties and it was the third circuit for the Deluxe. Or at least that's how I understand it.
    Jason
     
  5. joinpobob

    joinpobob Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    210
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2008
    Location:
    Gainesville
    Thanks, guys for the info. I am in limbo between buying a new amp or trying to build one. I guess I really dont need a new one, so I have the time to build (and would like to build one). I am just afraid that I would find myself way over budget/skill/time. But as was said, I am sure I could figure it out with the help of everyone here. So that build thread might be coming soon...
     
  6. ThermionicScott

    ThermionicScott Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    39
    Posts:
    5,913
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2005
    Location:
    SW CR IA US NA PE
    The way I understood it, the middle letter stands for the year the circuit was introduced. Hence all of the "C" amps introduced in 1953, the "E" amps introduced in 1955, "F" amps starting in 1956, etc. Which would be why amps like the first Tremolux already had an "E" designation. I could be wrong though...

    - Scott

    P.S. Didn't mean to step on your toes, Dangelico. Just thought I'd add that in. ;)
     
  7. Ben Harmless

    Ben Harmless Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,967
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2003
    Location:
    Salem, Mass
    You know, I wrote a big post on this when I was waiting for the bus to work this morning, and then didn't quite get to post it before the bus came. Others have since provided pretty much everything I wrote.

    I read up for a couple of years before I undertook my first (and still only) amp build. I was also somewhat familiar with the amp I was building, being that it was a near-copy of an amp that I already owned which I had done a decent amount of maintainence on over the years (biasing, cap job, etc). You don't have to be as slow and lazy as I am though.

    I recommend The Guitar Amp Handbook as a resource. In an early section, the book walks you through the operation of a basic tweed circuit, and this is a great intro to tube electronics.

    Always be safe. When discharging caps, the screwdriver method is not the best, though it does work. Build a tool with a resistor - it's a lot less violent.
     
  8. muchxs

    muchxs Doctor of Teleocity

    Posts:
    11,879
    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2004
    Location:
    New England
    Start simple and go slow. You can substitute time and knowledge for money. There's no substitute for time. Money, maybe. If you've got it. :lol:

    I'd say start with a tweed Champ because it's the simplest circuit out there. It's also like a ship in a bottle, the chassis is tiny and cramped. The tweed Princeton (5F2) is still simple but the chassis is a lot bigger.
     
  9. marshman

    marshman Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,976
    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2007
    Location:
    SE PA
    If you're definitely hung up on reverb, you might be able to simplify your process with a Princeton Reverb kit. It's only one channel, as opposed to the Deluxe Reverbs' two channels. For first buiild I highly recommend a kit--cause I didn't go that route and it was a pain.

    Here's a sample--no cabinet or speakers, from one of many possible sources...

    http://www.mojomusicalsupply.com/item.asp?pid=10104&pg=44991&id=5550011-4
     
  10. 6x47

    6x47 Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    804
    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2007
    Location:
    Northern ON
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.