So I mentioned Orange County Choppers recently and how fake that show was...

ReverendRevolver

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Reality TV isn't real??? What's next, pro-wrestling?
The thing is, professional wrestling has been "outed" numerous times since the 1930s for being "fake". How it evolved from 1920s contests into its current global existence is a story all its own.

But the thing with wrestling is that all its viewers, except MAYBE very young ones are completely aware of the fact that it's a work. Its sustained itself and expanded ever since the territory days by providing a show that was able to suspend your disbelief, at least in part, so you can enjoy it. That's the trick. Even when it's not a work, it can be portrayed as such, and occasionally (such as with Jerry Lawler and Andy Kaufman) it really seems like a legit shoot.

Reality TV presents itself as legit, and in many ways hinges upon its viewers not perceiving how fake it is. The scariest part for me is that while die hard wrestling fans know it's a work, reality TV fans seemed to have missed the memo. Frightening.
 

chris m.

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I was into air-cooled Vee Dubs for awhile. It seems to me that it is usually way cheaper to buy a VW that a good car restorer has done a great job on than to do it yourself....unless maybe you're a professional mechanic and/or auto body shop owner.

When I would go to VW shows there were lots of amazing vehicles for sale at quite decent prices. The guys who are really into restoring and/or souping up VWs are all about the process. As soon as they've shown the car a few times they want to sell it so they can start their next project. Of course, you do need to do your due diligence to make sure the guys who did the work weren't hacks.

But as an example I got a killer deal on a 1960 VW CrewCab that a really great professional VW mechanic that I knew well had completely rebuilt. He was in a bit of a financial pinch and needed to sell it quickly.

I kept it for about five years and sold it for a decent profit, although it is today worth a heck of a lot more. But after experiencing brake fade more than once on those four wheel drum brakes when carrying a heavy load, despite using engine braking and every trick in the book, I decided it was not a very practical truck as a daily driver. It was cool, though.

But if you take into account the many hours that the mechanics and restorers put into the vehicles, typically the prices they go for don't really reflect the original investment made. Maybe that's changed, though. But back in the day it really was a labor of love/hobby and the restorers didn't really expect to get full compensation for their labor.
 

Lowspeid

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In the book "Man in the white suit" written by Ben Collins, AKA The Stig, from the UK motoring show Top Gear, he detailed that it was scripted to hell and back. But that unforeseen occurrences were usually left in since it made for often hilarious scenes.

He himself was told by the director of the show to ignore the script and just do his own thing, which again made for hilarious scenes and situations.
Such a good read for any Top Gear fan!
 

rghill

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Used to watch "Fast N' Loud", but like any reality TV it was highly scripted. Wonder how many Gas Monkey Garage cars are out there on the road.

There was one of those custom bike shows filmed at a garage here in Phoenix, every once in a while I would see a highly custom bike running around near where the garage was.

Now I get my automotive fix on Youtube, my current favorite is this gal:

 

telleutelleme

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0517221217.jpg


I suppose this means I won't be getting thousands off e-bay for these Pez dispensers I was saving.
 

teletail

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Used to watch "Fast N' Loud", but like any reality TV it was highly scripted. Wonder how many Gas Monkey Garage cars are out there on the road.

There was one of those custom bike shows filmed at a garage here in Phoenix, every once in a while I would see a highly custom bike running around near where the garage was.

Now I get my automotive fix on Youtube, my current favorite is this gal:


I watched fast and loud when it first came out and was mostly about the cars. Gradually it became mostly about preening, posing, posturing attention hounds with a few minutes of cars thrown in. Same thing happens with every reality show I start watching. Miami Ink was incredible the first season, then it was all about the most inane, contrived nonsense like the apprentice finding baby formula or things unrelated to the shop or tattooing; LA Ink - incredible tattooers on the first season, then season 2, all made up drama; Ice Road Truckers - the first season they talked about how they measured the ice, what happens if someone goes to fast on the ice, and a lot of other interesting things, then it was all about the fussin' and the feudin'. Probably others that I've blocked out.
 

Blazer

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I watched fast and loud when it first came out and was mostly about the cars. Gradually it became mostly about preening, posing, posturing attention hounds with a few minutes of cars thrown in. Same thing happens with every reality show I start watching. Miami Ink was incredible the first season, then it was all about the most inane, contrived nonsense like the apprentice finding baby formula or things unrelated to the shop or tattooing; LA Ink - incredible tattooers on the first season, then season 2, all made up drama; Ice Road Truckers - the first season they talked about how they measured the ice, what happens if someone goes to fast on the ice, and a lot of other interesting things, then it was all about the fussin' and the feudin'. Probably others that I've blocked out.
Well, Miami Ink had some hilarious scenes, such as THIS one...
 

PhoenixBill

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Storage Wars was ridiculous the only time I watched a few minutes of it. Contrived drama and multiple camera angles while they “bid” on storage units. Then, when they won a unit and supposedly opened it for the big reveal, I saw that the show had already put in lighting in various places inside the unit so the cameras could get better shots. Pawn Stars? Clearly staged, and he always has experts a few minutes away that know these arcane tidbits of information on whatever is brought in.
 

Toto'sDad

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That will be a while. I think of when genetics and superconductivity were big news. We (the species) have had more progress learning the former than the latter.

Closer to the two topics, it was having 3 kids in diapers when I have my last TV and I think this show memories. We will watch TV in hotel rooms but otherwise stream. My actual TV knowledge is probably as out of date as my fashion knowledge but I don't kid myself that YouTube and web content are not somewhat the same.
Not having a tv nowadays is a kind of badge of honor. I was thirteen years old when we got out first TV, I enjoyed it then, and I'm still enjoying television today, I'm just careful about what I let run out of it into my living room!
That will be a while. I think of when genetics and superconductivity were big news. We (the species) have had more progress learning the former than the latter.

Closer to the two topics, it was having 3 kids in diapers when I have my last TV and I think this show memories. We will watch TV in hotel rooms but otherwise stream. My actual TV knowledge is probably as out of date as my fashion knowledge but I don't kid myself that YouTube and web content are not somewhat the same.
Well, your dream of EVs is coming true around here! The crappy looking little boogers mostly middle line Tesla models sneak up on me at the mailbox, when I'm trying to get across the street on my dog walk etc. As far as looks go, they would run a close second to a Yugo, but I guess beauty is in the eye of the beholder. I'm resigned to planned obsolescence at this point.
 

Alex_C

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I saw the show a couple of times. Corny but their construction techniques were scary. Pounding fork tubes with a large hammer to make them fit was a 'OMFG!' moment for me.
 

bottlenecker

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There were better places to spend stupid money on bikes. One of these was on display at the entrance to the Barber Museum for a while:
View attachment 984323

Those weren't stupid money. Not cheap, but as reasonable as a startup could make them. It's a real shame they weren't able to continue, because it was a very good product.
 
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getbent

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I was into air-cooled Vee Dubs for awhile. It seems to me that it is usually way cheaper to buy a VW that a good car restorer has done a great job on than to do it yourself....unless maybe you're a professional mechanic and/or auto body shop owner.

When I would go to VW shows there were lots of amazing vehicles for sale at quite decent prices. The guys who are really into restoring and/or souping up VWs are all about the process. As soon as they've shown the car a few times they want to sell it so they can start their next project. Of course, you do need to do your due diligence to make sure the guys who did the work weren't hacks.

But as an example I got a killer deal on a 1960 VW CrewCab that a really great professional VW mechanic that I knew well had completely rebuilt. He was in a bit of a financial pinch and needed to sell it quickly.

I kept it for about five years and sold it for a decent profit, although it is today worth a heck of a lot more. But after experiencing brake fade more than once on those four wheel drum brakes when carrying a heavy load, despite using engine braking and every trick in the book, I decided it was not a very practical truck as a daily driver. It was cool, though.

But if you take into account the many hours that the mechanics and restorers put into the vehicles, typically the prices they go for don't really reflect the original investment made. Maybe that's changed, though. But back in the day it really was a labor of love/hobby and the restorers didn't really expect to get full compensation for their labor.

Kindig started off modding a bug.

Edd on wheeler dealers was also a bug guy.

The first engines I ever rebuilt were vw engines. My dad supervised. My first car was a 72 bug. Through college I did valve jobs on bugs for fellow students and word of mouth in the parking lot of whatever dorm or apt I lived in. It was a good side hustle and I got a lot of cred from my friends. We were always working on Jeeps and pickups and fixing four wheelers.... VW and Chevy 350 are platforms to learn A LOT.
 

lammie200

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There were interesting motorcycle build shows before OCC and Jess James came around. One had some old dude that actually died doing a stunt. Not while shooting a show, however. There was also a guy that killed someone with a vehicle (also not while shooting a show) that did some time for it. I don't remember who those people were.
 

chris m.

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Kindig started off modding a bug.

Edd on wheeler dealers was also a bug guy.

The first engines I ever rebuilt were vw engines. My dad supervised. My first car was a 72 bug. Through college I did valve jobs on bugs for fellow students and word of mouth in the parking lot of whatever dorm or apt I lived in. It was a good side hustle and I got a lot of cred from my friends. We were always working on Jeeps and pickups and fixing four wheelers.... VW and Chevy 350 are platforms to learn A LOT.
Yeah, I got really good at adjusting valve clearance on my VWs. Required with every oil change at 3k miles. Kind of ridiculous, but these vehicles were originally designed for local driving. People might only need to do this service once or at most twice a year. Also I guess it doesn't get that hot in Germany so overheating wasn't as much of an issue. But those crappy heaters were not the best for German winters, I would think.

I still recall the smell of horsehair when the upholstery would get wet in my Dad's old white Beetle. I was around 7 or 8 when we had it so it was an early 60s model.
 

imwjl

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Not having a tv nowadays is a kind of badge of honor. I was thirteen years old when we got out first TV, I enjoyed it then, and I'm still enjoying television today, I'm just careful about what I let run out of it into my living room!

Well, your dream of EVs is coming true around here! The crappy looking little boogers mostly middle line Tesla models sneak up on me at the mailbox, when I'm trying to get across the street on my dog walk etc. As far as looks go, they would run a close second to a Yugo, but I guess beauty is in the eye of the beholder. I'm resigned to planned obsolescence at this point.
We have a TV but don't have a conventional source for it like antenna, cable provider or satellite provider. I don't know about it as a badge of honor as much as it being spending we don't care to do. Our other services the TV can play cost less.

I don't really dream of EVs as much as I think systematically and like better solutions. For examples, I've posted how the diesel UTV has been a good replacement for the pickup truck, how I'd like the convenience of full charge (filled up) from home. Also how good the state of renewables are where I live.

When we watch the cable shows and OCC characters cable TV or satellite was more the norm. Broadband cost more and WiFi was not as good. That show and others kind of worked when we had 3 kids in diapers.

:)

P.S. It's not like we don't like series or to spend. I follow Internet content much like a series. We like to do adventurous stuff that adds up as does where we live.
 

bottlenecker

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There were interesting motorcycle build shows before OCC and Jess James came around. One had some old dude that actually died doing a stunt. Not while shooting a show, however. There was also a guy that killed someone with a vehicle (also not while shooting a show) that did some time for it. I don't remember who those people were.

Jesse james had the first of the chopper shows. He got Indian Larry on tv in his second special, which was the best and most real thing from the world of choppers to ever make it on tv.
Larry eventually died doing a stunt show.
Billy lane is the guy who did time for hitting a rider while drunk driving, and he first appeared on some build off shows well after the jj specials.

I never liked jesse james' style, but he could build a bike, and he could do that because he could actually ride. Unlike a lot of those tv builders.
 

Recce

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I've done five vehicles in my life. Most of the work I did myself and it took time, but the result was what I wanted. You can find good people who can do stuff, but I have seen complete hose jobs too... lots of them. Hack, butcher, just untrained, unthoughtful work on a lot of stuff.

If money is no trouble, the kindig/martin suggestion is the sure thing. a friend of mine got a car from Dave Kindig. When he called, Dave said, '5 years' he was so back logged. (this is about 7 years ago.) He called him back and said, 'I'm in.' He got his car in about 2 years.
I don’t disagree. I took mine for the AC because that was past my ability. I watch Bitchin’ Rides and he does an awesome job. Also the guy from Fantom Works. The hard part is finding someone who does good work. Luckily I did that.
 

Recce

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Jesse james had the first of the chopper shows. He got Indian Larry on tv in his second special, which was the best and most real thing from the world of choppers to ever make it on tv.
Larry eventually died doing a stunt show.
Billy lane is the guy who did time for hitting a rider while drunk driving, and he first appeared on some build off shows well after the jj specials.

I never liked jesse james' style, but he could build a bike, and he could do that because he could actually ride. Unlike a lot of those tv builders.
Indian Larry did a stunt standing on his seat on his motorcycle. I saw it on some show. He died falling off doing that stunt. Hard way to go.
 

O- Fender

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Using cheap parts and a fancy paint job to make something that is more for looks than to be a quality product.

Sounds like how I build guitars.

Of course I don't have all that contrived (and annoying) family drama.
 




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