1. Win a Broadcaster or one of 3 Teles! The annual Supporting Member Giveaway is on. To enter Click Here. To see all the prizes and full details Click Here. To view the thread about the giveaway Click Here.

Smoker box & first attempt at a reverse seared ribeye - why have I not done this before?!?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Chud, Oct 5, 2020.

  1. Chud

    Chud Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,721
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2010
    Location:
    New York City
    The title says it all. We're slowly moving through that big box of Piedmontese steaks I received from family a little while back, trying to savor each one as we go along. I'm planning on reverse searing/smoking the Tomahawk on Saturday, so I wanted to get a little practice in on a ribeye first.

    I picked up a little smoker box for the gas grill and some applewood chips, soaked the chips and started up the grill with two burners to get the smoker box going initially before going down to one burner for a low and slow heat. I need to get a little more surgical with my temps on the burners because the smoker box went out after going down to medium heat on one burner, and was too hot on two medium burners. So I have a lid mount thermometer on the way that I'll install before Saturday and will play around with one burner on high, two burners on low, etc to see where the sweet spot is to hold about 200-225 degrees.

    I did a garlic, chipotle, and smoked paprika rub on the ribeye that turned out super tasty on a ribeye I just straight cooked on the grill a few weeks ago, so I figured it would be even better slow smoked and reverse seared. Needless to say, this was probably one of the best steaks I've ever had. About an hour in the smoke until it reached 110 degrees, then pulled it off while cranking up all 5 burners to do the quick sear up to 125-130 degrees.

    The rub got nice and crunchy where it hit the grill, and it was just melt-in-your-mouth delicious. Even the fat was saturated with the smoke and had nicely rendered with the slow cook.

    IMG_5642.JPG IMG_5641.JPG IMG_5643.jpg IMG_5644.JPG

    My wife was very skeptical about having the grill on for hours, and having a box on the burners essentially on fire, but she was singing a different tune after the first bite. I can't imagine grilling anything ever again without using the slow smoke/reverse sear method.

    I'll make sure to document and post the full experience with the Tomahawk Saturday.
     
  2. StevesBoogie

    StevesBoogie Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    729
    Joined:
    May 11, 2020
    Location:
    North Carolina
    My gosh those look fantastic. I envy your meat supply and your grilling skills. I totally suck at grilling!!!
     
    24 track, INFANT and Chud like this.
  3. TheGoodTexan

    TheGoodTexan Super Moderator Staff Member Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    17,730
    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2003
    Location:
    Nashville, TN
    Admin Post
    That's all I do with steaks anymore - slow smoke outside, then reverse sear inside.

    Something I might suggest: During your reverse sear, use a cast iron skillet and a ton of butter. Then cover the steak and allow it to "stand" for at least three minutes before serving. After the sear, I pull the steak from the skillet and put it in a bowl, then place a small pat of butter on top of it, then place another bowl up-side-down on top of that to trap the heat in. Makes it even more tender.
     
    24 track, hollowman, Hey_you and 3 others like this.
  4. Chud

    Chud Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,721
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2010
    Location:
    New York City
    I'll have to try that!!
     
    24 track likes this.
  5. Sequimite

    Sequimite Tele-Meister Ad Free Member

    Age:
    65
    Posts:
    380
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2018
    Location:
    Sequim, WA
    I'm doing ribeyes today for my wife's 66th birthday. It's about the only meat I haven't smoked. I've been using the butter pan sear this year and like the results.
     
    24 track and Chud like this.
  6. TheGoodTexan

    TheGoodTexan Super Moderator Staff Member Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    17,730
    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2003
    Location:
    Nashville, TN
    Admin Post
    Something I want to try... but I haven't done it yet: I want to purchase an entire beef loin (tenderloin) and smoke it... slow and low, like a brisket. Then slice it in serving sizes and reverse sear the individual steaks before serving. Smoked filet mignon. A beef loin is about $100... so I don't want to waste money on it really... if it doesn't turn out good. But I might be on to something.
     
  7. LutherBurger

    LutherBurger Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    5,188
    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2013
    Location:
    NYC
    I'm not interested in the reverse-sear method, but my wife gave me a smoker box as a birthday gift this year, along with bags of mesquite, hickory, pecan, and cherry wood chips. Best birthday gift ever. :)

    Mine has perforations in the bottom, so I lined it with heavy duty aluminum foil.
     
    Chud and loco gringo like this.
  8. loco gringo

    loco gringo Tele-Holic Gold Supporter

    Posts:
    895
    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2016
    Location:
    The Altered State
    This works great. I have done it several times.

    Another great thing is to buy a bone in pork loin. It is the other end of the loin from the little boneless loin you see in the grocery store. It is the rib chops still all stuck together. Smoke that to completely done and then slice into chops. I do this several times a year and it is great. I have put persimmon wood chunks on top of charcoal for this, and it is really good, but any good smoking wood will work.

    The whole loin will weigh about 10 lbs. My butcher will sell me a 1/2 of one, or I can even tell him how many rib bones I want. I have them take off the chine bone for me. If it is still on, it makes it harder to cut into chops. You can do it yourself, either before you smoke it or even after it is done, but it can be a hassle if you aren't familiar with it.

    The first place I saw these cooked like this was at Kreuz BBQ in Lockhart, TX back in the 80's. They don't use any spice rub, maybe light salt and pepper, and smoke in on oak. They are amazing.
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2020
  9. Lies&Distortion

    Lies&Distortion Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,291
    Joined:
    May 27, 2014
    Location:
    SE Michigan
    I use one of those on my gas grill. Love it.
    My big relevation was when I bought a cast iron grill plate. Takes the open flame worries away. No grease flare ups, things don't dry out as much. Small pieces don't fall through onto the burners. I use it in the oven too, once it's gets cold out.
     
    Chud likes this.
  10. Danb541

    Danb541 Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,800
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2019
    Location:
    Oregon
    I usually cooks steaks hot and fast on my pellet smoker. I think they taste better that way. I don't really like much smoke on certain beef steak cuts but think I will give this reverse sear a try next time I do a steak. Tri-tip and brisket and other beef cuts that are not your typical steaks I typically do slow and low. Tri-tip is probably my favorite cut to smoke. I don't reverse sear, they don't seem to need it on my smoker, I rub them with Montreal steak seasoning, no sugary rub on these bad boys. I smoke them at 225 -250 degrees for a 2-3 hours. They turn out awesome.
     
    Chud likes this.
  11. gregulator450

    gregulator450 Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    2,126
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2014
    Location:
    The Dry Side
    looks perfect! The reverse sear is my favorite way to cook steaks. Do yourself a favor and pick up a digital thermometer with a probe that you can suspend on the grill grate with a clip (or better yet, multiple probes so you can read internal meat temps and grill temps), and get a handheld digital instant-read too.

    Lid-mount thermo's read the temperature at the height of the the thermo, which can be quite different from grill-height temperatures. Also, unless you buy a high quality bi-metal thermometer, you will likely get inaccurate readings from it anyway. Digital is simply much more accurate. In my own testing, because I got grill-nerdy about eight years ago, I never found a bi-metal meat thermo that was less than 20 degrees off, and I had lid-mounted thermos that were as far as 70 degrees different than the temperature at grill grate level. How much of that is due to thermo inaccuracy vs. measuring 6 inches above the grate, I do not know, but I always trust the digital thermos.
     
    24 track and Chud like this.
  12. dkmw

    dkmw Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    65
    Posts:
    5,144
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Location:
    Florida USA
    I know what you mean about the risks of throwing $100 worth of whole tenderloin on the fire. I always get the heebie-jeebies. I haven’t ruined one yet, thank goodness.
     
    24 track, Chud and TheGoodTexan like this.
  13. 1293

    1293 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,007
    Joined:
    May 18, 2006


    Baste in a skillet with butter, parsley, garlic and shallot when the steak hits 120F.
     
    24 track likes this.
  14. dkmw

    dkmw Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    65
    Posts:
    5,144
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Location:
    Florida USA
    Or you could try this if your grill is broke:

    BBB1C5B5-BE92-4582-B777-7A2F9FEDB8CE.jpeg
     
  15. Ricky D.

    Ricky D. Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    69
    Posts:
    10,985
    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2006
    Location:
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Eat your mistakes. How bad can it be?
     
    24 track and loco gringo like this.
  16. Chud

    Chud Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,721
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2010
    Location:
    New York City
    Depends on how you like your hockey pucks cooked.
     
    24 track likes this.
  17. Hey_you

    Hey_you Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    767
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2019
    Location:
    Colorado USA
    That is how a properly cooked steak should look! Grads! If ever in doubt, the science of cooking site; https://amazingribs.com/

    An ad blocker is advised tho.
     
    24 track likes this.
  18. old soul

    old soul Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    459
    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2015
    Location:
    terra firma
    I smoke a ton of meat! Its wonderful! Had some smoked turkey chili tonight.
    Honestly my favorite piece of meat to smoke is the chicken thigh. Leave the skin on when its smoking and it'll shrivel up and just pull it off when it's ready to eat. All the fat from the skin makes the thigh meat super tender
     
  19. Unionjack515

    Unionjack515 Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,261
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2016
    Location:
    Batavia, IL
    If you throw it on a hot flat top or pan with some oil skin side down after you smoke it, you get the flavor of smoked chicken and the bonus crispy skin.
     
    24 track and Nightclub Dwight like this.
  20. stxrus

    stxrus Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    68
    Posts:
    6,290
    Joined:
    May 25, 2007
    Location:
    St. Croix, USVI
    I’ve got two smoker boxes for the gas Weber. I have apple, pecan, cedar, sea grape, tan tan, and pear. Hickory and mesquite are used less.

    I normally use a higher heat than lower for steaks. Fish is done on upper moderate heat with a grill mat. The rotisserie is low heat for a longer time. Pork loins/tenderloins, Cornish hens, are done on low heat

    A meat thermometer is your best friend
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.