Small Drum Set

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Pualee, Oct 14, 2019.

  1. Pualee

    Pualee Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    514
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2014
    Location:
    Virginia
    So I come in here periodically looking for non-guitar help.

    I'm in the market for a drum set for my kids. I have a rather small house, but it is centered on a 800 sq ft great room (kitchen, dining room, living room in one). This is about half of my living space. It has a vaulted ceiling with a natural reverb.

    I want to put a drum set in this space at Christmas. It needs to function with guitars and a keyboard - not over powered for a small space.

    I have looked at digital drum sets - this is the easy way - controlling volume. But I would really rather have acoustic if possible. Where do I look? How do I know if the set is right. I don't normally see drums as accessible in music stores like guitars. I can't try 100 sets and compare the volume - not that a guitar sounds the same at home as it does in the music store.

    I'm thinking electric might be the go-to solution, but I really want a small acoustic - not a toy. Are cocktail sets worth the effort?
     
  2. nvilletele

    nvilletele Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,870
    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2008
    Location:
    California
    I seem to recall, from searching for a drum set for my daughter, a smallish but decent enough set by Pearl called the Rhythm Traveler I think. Maybe check it out if still around.

    Most of the small sized drum sets I saw were more like toys. I ended up getting my daughter a full sized pearl mid level set.

    I currently have a Roland TD-20W electronic set. If you do go electronic, make sure to get mesh heads and spend enough for a decent set if possible. If you can find a used TD-12 at a decent price, grab it.
     
    gitold likes this.
  3. drumtime

    drumtime Tele-Meister

    Age:
    68
    Posts:
    385
    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2018
    Location:
    the mountains of Virginia
    Ludwig Breakbeats are kid sized and supposed to be good -- I've never seen a set. Questlove supposedly designed them, and he endorses them.

    Kid's drums usually have a 16" kick, and pretty crappy snare and toms.

    You could always get a small adult kit -18" kick and shallow, smaller size toms. I think the Tama Stagestar comes in these sizes. That's what I use in my small studio, and with the right heads, it sounds huge.
     
    telemnemonics likes this.
  4. rze99

    rze99 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    7,942
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2014
    Location:
    South London UK
    When my son was younger I wanted a kit for him to learn on as well as for me to play on. I started out on drums and still like to play from time to time.

    My drummer at the time, Dan, said "find a small jazz kit - proper drums just small size and that can be tightly packed".

    So I did. I bought an ex-demo. Premier Cabria Bebop kit. It was relatively inexpensive small enough for him to learn on yet good enough to have done paid gigs. You can find them used sometimes. The cymbals are replacements.

    The pic is from my son's room when he was learning.

    https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/premier-cabria-small-jazz-bop-size-1776045651

    IMG_4870.JPG
     
  5. Chud

    Chud Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,413
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2010
    Location:
    New York City
    Yeah, I was going to suggest a jazz or cocktail kit too.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  6. scelestus

    scelestus Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    325
    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2018
    Location:
    Michigan
    I went from a big kit down to a Sonor Safari. I don't think they make them anymore but you might be able to find one. It's a bit like the Ludwig Breakbeats mentioned above.

    I think in this range the wood is all going to be similar mystery Asian stuff. The real thing I'd look at is the hardware. Is it heavy-duty? Does it look like it'll fall apart? That's what sold me on the Sonor.

     
  7. SPUDCASTER

    SPUDCASTER Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    8,561
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2010
    Location:
    Grangeville, Idaho
    What's your budget?

    The Breakbeats look like an adequate set given your parameters. If recording, the smaller sizes can sound a lot bigger than expected. I like the 14" snare size.

    Most vendors have an extended warranty. Sometimes it's free or not too much.

    Consider you'll need stands, bass drum pedal(usually included in the hardware set), throne and cymbals.

    Be prepared for around a $1000+/- if buying new. And that's entry level package prices for a little above average set. It's like any other musical gear. Don't go too cheap. Buy something to grow into.

    I just acquired an Alesis Command mesh kit. Sweetwater is having a sale on these now. They also carry the Alesis Strike 12 2000 watt amp. Both would run you around $900.

    I still have my acoustic drums, but I'm having fun with the electronics.

    I'm glad I learned the nuances of playing an acoustic set first.

    Not affiliated with Sweetwater, just buy gear from them now and then.

    Hope your kids get into it. Music is fun, entertaining and educational.
     
  8. SolidSteak

    SolidSteak Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,930
    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2016
    Location:
    USA
    Small jazz "bop kits" are fun. I got this one a few years ago for $350, with hardware and cymbals included:
    https://www.guitarcenter.com/Pearl/Roadshow-4-Piece-Jazz-Drum-Set.gc

    Looks like it's $380-$400 now.

    The cymbals were garbage, but everything else is pretty ok for a small, cheap kit. Get some used hats and a used crash/ride later and have fun!



    I really wanted one of those Questlove Breakbeats kits, but they cost a bit more than the Pearl Roadshow.
     
  9. CK Dexter Haven

    CK Dexter Haven Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    58
    Posts:
    3,435
    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2017
    Location:
    GCDB
    My bop kit is a old US made Remo Pre-tuned System kit, It was about$ 25 for the shells a few years ago, Remo still makes the heads but the retaining clips are no longer available. These take a lot of stick from “ serious” drummers but they work great for low volume situations. I had a original Rhythm Traveler, it was Ok , and the better of the two Breakbeats is a nice kit, but can get quite loud. Premier has made a number of nice small kits over the years ( I have two)but there is no NA presence at the moment so parts for the mounts & lugs etc. can be difficult to source outside of ordering things from the UK ( shipping is killer) or getting lucky at a drum shop/ show. I lucked into $10 floor tom legs for one kit in just that way.
     
  10. Daytona.57

    Daytona.57 Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    149
    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2014
    Location:
    Calabogie, On, Canada
    If you buy a used semi pro kit, it will hold its value on resale. Cymbals are the expensive component. Buy pro quality and they will sound superior. Drum brands sound remarkably the same, cymbals don't.

    A proper throne is important for posture, motor cycle seat is ergonomic.

    Hardware stands, light weight, eases load in and out, Yamaha are great.

    Lessons are important when starting out.

    YMMV
     
  11. Pualee

    Pualee Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    514
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2014
    Location:
    Virginia
    Thanks for the replies.

    To the question regarding budget - I haven't really made one yet. I found a used Roland set for $550, and an amp for $350. This is probably the upper end of what I want to spend.

    I'm definitely hoping to look over the acoustic options before I buy and I appreciate the advice about various components and parts. Since space is a serious issue at my house (for the kit, and the volume), and I don't want 'kids' stuff, I have to be very careful in the selection.
     
  12. tweedtone

    tweedtone Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

    Age:
    53
    Posts:
    1,508
    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2004
    Location:
    Tampa Bay, FL
  13. uriah1

    uriah1 Telefied Gold Supporter

    Posts:
    21,200
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2011
    Location:
    Around
    Ya, Safari or a small jazz kit.
     
  14. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Age:
    60
    Posts:
    18,964
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2010
    Location:
    Maine
    Agree with the Jazz kit suggestions, certainly not a cocktail kit though as from what I've seen these are standup drums.
    There may be equivalent to Jazz kits sold without the Jazz name too.

    I would buy the "kit" as the three pieces with no snare, or maybe with the snare, but not a new kit that includes cymbals and stands.
    You get terrible cymbals that way and the illusion of low price is a waste of money IMO.

    Cheaper stands and more expensive cymbals is where I'd put the money, and if a kit with no snare, look for older slingerland wood snares that are fairly cheap used but sound nice and are not super loud. That's taste though.
    Cymbals get expensive and even if just hi hats and a crash/ ride, you can spend half your budget there.
    Cheap toms don't sound as bad as cheap cymbals IMO.

    The other day at GC I saw a decent bigger used kit for like $250, used is really the way to go if your budget is on the low side and you don't want to hear cheapo sheet metal clanking where the sound of cymbals are supposed to be.

    Ebay is great for cymbals, hi hats are expensive in stores and cheap to ship, so that's one buy it's worth spending some time trying to win a good deal at auction on IMO.
    You'll listen to countless hours of those buggers, so buy carefully!
     
  15. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Age:
    60
    Posts:
    18,964
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2010
    Location:
    Maine
    For a start looking at hi hats here's a perfectly nice pair of vintage Zildjian A hi hats for a fair enough price.
    Not sure these are really '60s, could be '70s but the price is fine for whatever year, assuming they take an lower offer.
    Look at cymbals and you can see that these are cast bronze, hammered and milled, as opposed to the mostly cheaper to make stamped sheet metal.
    The weights are good too, sets get mixed up and you can end up with two heavy bottom hats after top hats got cracked.
    I prefer 15" hats but I'd buy these if I had none.

    http://rover.ebay.com/rover/1/711-5...0001&campid=5338148343&icep_item=333352070060
     
  16. PastorJay

    PastorJay Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,417
    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2014
    Location:
    California
    telemnemonics likes this.
  17. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Age:
    60
    Posts:
    18,964
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2010
    Location:
    Maine
    These may go a good deal cheaper and are newer, I'd guess '80s and certainly not '60s but still real cast and hammered bronze.
    The weights are more rock and these are on a million recordings.
    The printing gives away that they are not '60s AFAIK.
    Again, cheap cymbals sound way worse than cheap toms, and hi hat technique is partly developed by listening to the sound you make.

    http://rover.ebay.com/rover/1/711-5...0001&campid=5338148343&icep_item=254385689054
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.