Small cautionary tale

horseman308

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I was cutting the roundover for a body a little while ago and had a briefly alarming moment. I chose my trim router, as I have grown more and more leery of my 2hp plunge router. More and more, these things make me nervous.

Somehow, in a moment of carelessness my right hand ring-finger slipped into the opening in the back where you tighten the chuck. I must have touched the chuck, rather than the but, as there was no cut. But man, that was way too close for comfort. I probably wouldn't have done that of I'd used the big router, since I would have had to hold both the handles for control.

Point being, the small machines can be more dangerous than the big ones if you're not real careful. I got complacent due to the smaller size of the trim router, while I think I'd have been more careful due to the size of the big one.

Just be careful y'all!
 

Telekarster

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Whoa.... that was a close call. Yeah, they all make me nervous. Years ago a buddy of mine was building a deck, using an air nailer. He was holding a board down with one hand while nailing with the other. The nailer jumped on him and shot a 12P nail right through his left index finger, nailing him to the board!!!! OUCH!!!! He was laid up with a huge cast/splint thingy around his left hand/finger for months... be careful out there folks! Tools are dangerous and can leave you a non-player in a split second.
 

jimmywrangles

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Lucky, very lucky. I've had a few near misses in my time.
I nearly got my hair caught in a metal lathe once when younger, I never forgot that.
At the same work place a friend lost a finger in a lathe during a brief lapse of concentration.
Power tools can bite and when they do it happens so fast nothing can stop it so be careful peoples.
Great thread.
PS: My big router also makes me nervous at times,I call it the beast in the box and I treat it with respect.
 

JL_LI

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Close call. My left hand slipped off the chuck key removing a bit from a drill press and I sliced open my thumb on the bit. No stitches. I washed it and closed it up with CA. I learned a lesson. Wear gloves. There are gloves in the shop for a reason.
 
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rstaaf

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I have a smaller 1.25hp Dewalt with both a fixed and a plunge base that I got specifically for guitar work.
I have a 1.5hp DeWalt router with just a fixed base. I bought the smaller one as I felt even the 1.5 was a bit too much most of the time.
I also have a 1.0hp Makita that I have had for many years that needs a new cord. Love that router, need to get it fixed.

1.25hp DeWalt 611
20211126_195617345_iOS.jpg 20211126_195620128_iOS.jpg

1.5hp DeWalt 610 and 1.0hp Makita 3606
20211126_200826092_iOS.jpg
Honestly, I have drawn more blood in guitars from copper shielding foil than anything else :lol::lol::lol:
 
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G.Rotten

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I was cutting the roundover for a body a little while ago and had a briefly alarming moment. I chose my trim router, as I have grown more and more leery of my 2hp plunge router. More and more, these things make me nervous.

Somehow, in a moment of carelessness my right hand ring-finger slipped into the opening in the back where you tighten the chuck. I must have touched the chuck, rather than the but, as there was no cut. But man, that was way too close for comfort. I probably wouldn't have done that of I'd used the big router, since I would have had to hold both the handles for control.

Point being, the small machines can be more dangerous than the big ones if you're not real careful. I got complacent due to the smaller size of the trim router, while I think I'd have been more careful due to the size of the big one.

Just be careful y'all!
I won't post the pic for the squeamish but many years ago now my buddy was in dire need of help to finish putting siding on his house before a huge storm was set to hit.

He was using 10 or 12" cedar boards. On the first day we had his dad's table saw to rip whatever boards we needed narrower but on the second day we didn't. The rain was already starting and we were set up under a portable car port with all the tools and material.

My buddy and I decide to use a Skill Saw instead of the table saw to rip the boards down with my friend holding the board stable and me with the saw. At some point he moved or dropped the board causing the saw to pop out of the board and over my thumb right through the finger nail. Amazingly not hitting the bone or taking the whole end off. With a few minutes to process and a lot of cursing we still had to finish the job. 4 more hours of working in the rain on a ladder with an air nailer and mutilated thumb.

They make various versions of tools for specific uses and only the right tool is the right tool.

I have 3 or 4 routers and they all scare the crap out of me everytime. I consider it a healthy fear and one that keeps me respecting the tool.

By the way the storm was the tail end of what Southern Ontario got from hurricane Sandy. Obviously, we got lucky by comparison but it wasn't a little April Shower either.
 
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horseman308

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@G.Rotten, yikes! I used to work in a custom cabinet shop, and we had an install at a lake house about an hour from the nearest anything. I've got a big scar on my right forearm where the sheet metal from the back of an oven sliced me while moving it into position. I never felt a thing; right into the muscle. The only reason I knew something was wrong was when my boss asked why there was blood all over the new kitchen floor. 18 stitches and still had to finish the workday.
 

dogmeat

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long ago I worked in a counter top shop. my boss had a cool looking "claw" on his left hand. he got a couple fingers into a laminate trim router and it really did a number. whatever the bit encounters just gets turned to shreds, but he said the worst of it was the router pulled the tendons out of his arm all the way to his shoulder. like 10" dangling out the end of the finger stumps. so yeah, 2 good fingers and 2 bony projection things.... great for scarin' the children
 

G.Rotten

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@G.Rotten, yikes! I used to work in a custom cabinet shop, and we had an install at a lake house about an hour from the nearest anything. I've got a big scar on my right forearm where the sheet metal from the back of an oven sliced me while moving it into position. I never felt a thing; right into the muscle. The only reason I knew something was wrong was when my boss asked why there was blood all over the new kitchen floor. 18 stitches and still had to finish the workday.

I wish my stories made me sound more tough and less stupid. Lol. I love woodworking but know if I did it for a living, it would likely be the end of me.

IMO you had earned the rest of the day off.
 

Cpb2020

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I have a few scars and have had other close calls.

In each instance, I was trying to rush as I either didn’t have adequate time (end of the day or losing light), or didn’t want to “waste” time to go back to get the proper tool.

Fortunately with age I’ve gained patience, a healthy dose of fear, and an understanding that there’s always tomorrow.
 

horseman308

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I wish my stories made me sound more tough and less stupid. Lol. I love woodworking but know I shouldn't do it for a living.

IMO you had earned the rest of the day off.
If we hadnt been working 2 hours from that site and all riding in the delivery trucks, I would have. But I had no way home.

My worst injuries since then have all been pretty minor. I got stitches in my left pointer finger twice in 2020 (that year sucked on SO many levels) from a chisel and a marking knife. But apart from that, no issues. One reason I've gravitated to mostly hand tools is the prospect of serious injury goes way down.
 

G.Rotten

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If we hadnt been working 2 hours from that site and all riding in the delivery trucks, I would have. But I had no way home.

My worst injuries since then have all been pretty minor. I got stitches in my left pointer finger twice in 2020 (that year sucked on SO many levels) from a chisel and a marking knife. But apart from that, no issues. One reason I've gravitated to mostly hand tools is the prospect of serious injury goes way down.


I went the other direction. I program/operate a CNC for my main gig. I'm like 12 feet from the action (with a plexiglass wall in-between.
 

TokyoPortrait

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Hi.

Yikes, I’m sitting here cringing and involuntarily squirming. Not gonna read any more.

Many of us probably have a horror story or two, witnessed or experienced. None of mine are too outrageous, but I still won’t share them.

First time I turned a hand held router on, I thought, well, somebody simply doesn’t care if I get out of this in one piece or not.

As for my router, I only have a little trimmer type. Still, it scares the living heck out of me. I’m meticulously prepared, super slow and methodically careful with it.

Pax/
Dean
 

yepyep

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Close call. My left hand slipped off the chick key removing a bit from a drill press snd I sliced open my thumb on the bit. No stitches. I washed it and closed it up with CA. I learned a lesson. Wear gloves. There are gloves in the shop for a reason.
I turned on my drill press with the key this week. Close call. It just missed breaking a redwood soundboard. More importantly it didn't shatter my hand. Stay alert, don't let deadlines make you unsafe
 

hopdybob

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for me i learnt one rule.
everything that cuts/grinds is something that has to be respected not to give you back what it took of you.

a friend was neglecting the rule that in a carpenter shop you don't use clothes with wide sleeves.
on the plane bench his sweater was drawn into the blades and he could tear himself lose in time before his arm would get cut.

another friend came to talk to his college who was working on a belt-sander table that had a addition like this on top
proxy-image

he leans over to lay his arm on the table, his sleeve got caught by the sandingpaper and grinded a piece of skin of his arm.

always dryrun, keep your floor clean so you don't stumble and focus on what you are doing and what it will cost when you don't
 




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