Simple, Cheap Pickup Winder

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by R. Stratenstein, Jul 17, 2012.

  1. jimdkc

    jimdkc Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Age:
    63
    Posts:
    2,256
    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2009
    Location:
    Independence, MO
    I don't have them yet... but I ordered these:

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/130702525425

    A3144. 4.5 to 24 VDC supply, 25mA open collector output. Seems to be the most common Hall Effect sensor available on eBay.
     
  2. sink

    sink Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    131
    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2011
    Location:
    A panhandle by the sea.
    Hey Rick,

    Thanks for the ideas, I'll try to hook up my blue and black wires tonight before completely giving up on the opto-coupler. For a reflective surface I used couple different types of metal and a mirror.
     
  3. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    15,911
    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Location:
    Loganville, Ga.
    Sink, The hookup diagram for the Hall sensor I used is at the end of post #460 in this thread. The blue and black wires should only require a momentary touch to reset the counter, then stay open. When the black and white wires touch, that creates a count on the display.

    I can't imagine why your opto-sensor would not work with a mirror as reflector. Did you try looking at the sensor with a digital camera's monitor screen? Most digital cameras don't filter infrared light, so the little led in the sensor, viewed through the camera's screen, should be clearly glowing. Not like the sun or anything, but there is no doubt it's on. (If it's on)
     
  4. sink

    sink Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    131
    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2011
    Location:
    A panhandle by the sea.
    I used my iPhone camera and still couldn't see anything. I had some success though, but I'll post it on my thread to try and keep stuff together.
     
  5. Rob DiStefano

    Rob DiStefano Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Age:
    74
    Posts:
    10,098
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2003
    Location:
    NJ via TX
    HEMP!!!! - it's got The Tone!!!! [​IMG] :D :lol: :rolleyes: :cool:

    [​IMG]
     
  6. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    15,911
    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Location:
    Loganville, Ga.



    And even if it doesn't, it sounds like it does. Pass me the Doritos, please!:D
     
  7. Rob DiStefano

    Rob DiStefano Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Age:
    74
    Posts:
    10,098
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2003
    Location:
    NJ via TX
    ya know that lindy's got his holy grail of potting wax tone with pure paraffin and now i've got my holy grail of tone with hemp pup wrapping cord. and if ya believe either of us, i've got a little bridge in brooklyn up for a cheap sale .... [​IMG]
     
  8. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    15,911
    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Location:
    Loganville, Ga.
    Say, I've been looking for a bridge for a while now. Is this bridge you have for sale a nice one? Would you consider a trade?

    BTW, I thought of you today, Rob. Harbor Freight was on my way home so I stopped in just to walk around a little, and when I got to the lathes, there your little wood lathe was--only $125. I thought, "I bet Rob's got his running right now." Little did I know that you were rolling up some hemp!!:eek:
     
  9. Barncaster

    Barncaster Doctor of Teleocity

    Posts:
    10,961
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2010
    Location:
    Northern California
    Rick,

    Did you get weak in HF??

    Rob
     
  10. Rob DiStefano

    Rob DiStefano Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Age:
    74
    Posts:
    10,098
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2003
    Location:
    NJ via TX
    .......
     
  11. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    15,911
    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Location:
    Loganville, Ga.
    Strat Pup Mule Update

    Man, was this thread buried deep! Anyway, too much going on, work's been crazy-busy, and I'm starting a major woodworking project that Santa has promised for Christmas, that's consuming what little shop time I get.

    At any rate, I've squeezed in a few sessions on the GFS neckbody project I'm using as the test mule for my strat pup winds, my first ones, which I also hope to work into some kind of player.

    The neck was clearly set up for, or maybe even at one time had, a locking nut, which I decided to replace with a conventional nut. There's a pretty good picture of what I was working with back on post #478 of this thread.

    I ordered some Indian Rosewood, and Cocobolo from LMI. First step was to match wood as closely as possible, to create the "transition" and back up the nut. I considered just setting and glueing the nut in place, but the canyon in which the trussrod nut sits was just so exposed, it needed covering.

    I decided on the Cocobolo. In this photo, I rubbed a little oil on the end of it, and it's "close". Kinda. Oh, well, I have no idea what's on the thing now.

    [​IMG][/IMG]

    While I was working on the headstock end, I thought I'd see how paint stripper would work on the plastic coating all over the guitar, or whatever it is.

    This is ultra nasty stuff, look at what it did to the can just sitting in the cooler basement, after being opened outdoors in the warmer air!

    [​IMG][/IMG]

    I put a blob below the bridge, and just let it sit there while I worked on the headstock end.

    [​IMG][/IMG]

    Somebody had already started to sand off the finish on the arm relief bout. It is kind of liberating to have a finish on there that is tougher than nails, and that you couldn't care less about, so you're not always fussing with a soft bench cover, watching out for stray tools or screws, etc. :lol: Bring 'em on.

    So back to the headstock. What I hope to do is use the ROSS to sand a transition-like curve in the end of the board, then saw off just enough to cover the trussrod slot and give the nut some backing. I'll glue that down, then trim it to fit.

    So we begin with the --BOSS-- it was already set up, and the ROSS was not.

    [​IMG][/IMG]

    Being Cocobolo, I wheeled my little stand for the sanders out the shop door, so the sawdust would not contaminate my shop. I also used a dust mask. I don't want any respiratory issues with exotic wood dust.

    I just hand-held the wood strip (fretboard blank for bass) up against the spindle freehand, until I'd sanded a typical transitional curve in the end.

    The headstock is actually scarfed on at an angle, so there's really no Fender type transition, but I thought just a little rectangle of wood might look funny, so the sanding.

    Measured with the nut blank in place, and cut the transitioned piece off in my slotting box with fine-tooth fret slot saw.

    Glued and clamped it in place, without trimming.

    [​IMG][/IMG]

    Next day it was ready for nest steps.

    [​IMG][/IMG]

    You might be able to see where the damn thing slipped just a little, and the nut blank fits a little sloppy in the near side.. Ah, well, it's gonna be glued down.

    So I wheeled my assembly bench out the shop door, again so cocobolo dust would not be a problem in the shop, and donned my dust mask.

    [​IMG][/IMG]

    Trimmed it with my saw, rasp, and file.

    [​IMG][/IMG]
    [​IMG][/IMG]

    You can see a little piece of plastic I had the foresight to cut and put over the trussrod nut before I glued the piece on, so in case any glue dripped or oozed into the cavity, it wouldn't affect the trussrod action.

    Got the wood piece trimmed to size and rough sanded. Time to fit the nut.

    [​IMG][/IMG]

    I like the half-pencil method along with the compensated string spacing guide for initial rough cutting and layout of the nut.

    [​IMG][/IMG]
    [​IMG][/IMG]

    I use a craft store Exacto type razor saw to rough trim the nut to size, and to cut the preliminary location slots in the nut for the strings.

    [​IMG][/IMG]

    I'm a little off on a couple of these slots--it never pays to be in a rush.

    I also mounted a set of machine heads I had:

    [​IMG][/IMG]

    And, finally, shaped and sanded the nut, then glued it in place with Titebond thinned with a little water, so it will be able to be knocked loose if necessary.

    .[​IMG][/IMG]

    But while I had the BOSS out, I took advantage of the opportunity to change Zippy the Pinhead's profile a little:

    I used a bottle cap from something, forget what, to use as much of the wood as possible to get a rounded end, and traced it.

    [​IMG][/IMG]

    Then rough-cut it with the slotting saw

    [​IMG][/IMG]

    And then sanded it round, as can be seen in the tuning-machine photo above. Still not very pretty, but better. At least that hideous pointy end is gone.

    Finally, how did the stripper do? About like I thought it would:

    [​IMG][/IMG]

    After about three hours, and with me renewing the blob every so often, it barely made a little stain on the surface of the stuff. Tuff stuff, too bad it's in such bad shape and looks so crappy. It will eventually come off, but that's another job for another time.

    Next up I'll finish filing the string slots, set it up just a little, and plug the damn thing in and see if I can get any noise out of it.

    Thanks for looking in,
    Rick
     
  12. GooseYArd

    GooseYArd Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    130
    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    R.Strat. , does this sensor look like it'd work well?

    http://me.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Honeywell/SS411P/?qs=sGAEpiMZZMvhQj7WZhFIAHJlOJm5xfirVfJ//Na6WJA=

    It's also digital and has a pullup resistor built in. I'm hoping to mimic your hall effect counter, but I'd like to use my Arduino uno instead of buying a counter, since its lying around doing nothing at the moment. My board has a 3.3Vdc supply, so I think the 2-7vdc range should be ok. I am pretty clueless about electronics unfortunately.
     
  13. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    15,911
    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Location:
    Loganville, Ga.
    GooseYard, I think this sensor might give you problems. It is bipolar, which as I understand the data sheet's description, requires alternating North and South magnetic fields to trigger it. As I understand it, it either latches into on when North passes by, then won't release until South passes by. (Or vice-versa). Or, it may also mean that it will close and release with each pass of the magnet, but the magnets have to be first North, then South, repeating the pattern. Not sure how you'd physically set this up to work properly.

    Can you find an omnipolar version of it? (will respond to either North or South)

    or even a Unipolar version? (will respond to North, or South but not both, you just have to be careful when you set up your counter arrangement so your trigger magnet is oriented properly.

    Omnipolar is easiest and most dependable.

    I'd love to see how you do this. I also have an arduino, but no clue how to hook it up for this (or just about any other) application.

    Rick
     
  14. jimdkc

    jimdkc Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Age:
    63
    Posts:
    2,256
    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2009
    Location:
    Independence, MO
    Actually... a bi-polar sensor might be better for high-speeds. You could space out a North then a South facing magnet to deliver a wider trigger pulse to the counter.
     
  15. GooseYArd

    GooseYArd Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    130
    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    I guess I can situate two magnets 180 degrees apart on the bobbin plate (so it'd effectively be one magnet running from 6 o clock to 12 o clock on the wheel), and then just count the pulses coming from the IC.

    I'll keep you posted when my order arrives- I was kind of nervous about using an analog sensor with the arduino, but it sounds like these digital ones should be pretty easy to use on the arduino if I can get the magnets and sensor happy together.

    I guess if I get bold enough I can try swapping my sewing machine motor out for a DC motor of some sort and use one of the arduino PWM controllers to automate my winding speed! This is exciting!
     
  16. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    15,911
    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Location:
    Loganville, Ga.

    Two magnets, arranged North and South facing the sensor, 180 degrees apart, on a wheel or beam, is the way I envisioned having to use this sensor.

    The term "latching" was used in one of the pieces of documentation you linked to, GooseYard, making me believe when one pole passes, it latches on, and when the opposite pole passes, it latches off, then repeats with each rotation of the wheel or beam. Assuming the circuitry is fast enough to register essentially two events per revolution, as jimdkc says, it might even be more reliable at higher speeds, because the dwell of each cycle would be more closely controlled, and possibly a bit longer.

    However, and this is what caused my concern in my original answer, if it does not latch on and off, but simply requires that opposite poles trigger it on for each successive cycle, if you use the magnets described as we've discussed here, you'll get two counts per revolution. You might be able to cook up an Arduino sketch that would simply divide the counts by two to display, so you'll be counting actual revolutions, or even just remember that the displayed count is twice the actual revolutions. But I can't think of another way you could configure the magnets so the wheel or beam would be balanced, plus get the alternating poles passing the sensor each time.

    Please definitely keep us posted on how this develops. I can see a lot of semi-automation potential with using Arduino, including a servo or stepper-powered auto-traverse, auto speed control (as you mentioned), and pre-set auto shutdown after the programmed number of winds are laid down. It is pretty exciting. I wish I knew a little (mabye a lot) more about wiring and writing sketches for Arduinos.
     
  17. GooseYArd

    GooseYArd Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    130
    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    will do! the programming part is no problem for me, that's what I do for a living, but the circuits part I know _jack_ about. In college I had a lab partner who worked at a company that built sensors, so we always worked together, and he'd build the interfaces and I'd program the embedded board, so I managed to learn virtually nothing about hooking up the sensors :)
     
  18. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    15,911
    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Location:
    Loganville, Ga.
    Great Way to Start the New Year

    Well, had to dig deep to resurrect this thread again, but after much deliberation and soul-searching, I decided to do a full refurb. job on my 65 blackface Bandmaster. I did the 3-prong plug install, taking the "death cap" out of the circuit, replaced all the plate resistors, which I hope will permanently remove the frying bacon sound that frequently would just start up, I recapped all the power caps and the electrolytics on the main board, preserving the molded tone (signal path) caps. I also replaced the vibrato (actually tremolo) "roach" optocoupler, because I've never liked the trem on this bandmaster. Replaced the main two input jacks that I had "cleaned up" with a rat-tail file in my stoopid teens :rolleyes:, and cleaned all the pots and the bright switches with Deoxit.

    I am very pleased, and not a little relieved, with the results. The thing sounds fabulous, has the best trem. you can expect from an optocoupler type tremolo, and from limited playing tonight, the sizzle did not reappear. Controls and bright switches are dead quiet--it's just amazing. Can't believe I waited so long to do this.

    So, now, I'm gonna set up the hellboy strat with the first pups I wound, and record a little video of it. Hopefully sometime this week.

    Couple of pics of the amp job--I'm going to post a proper thread on the Shock Bros. or whatever the appropriate forum is:


    Happy New Year, Everyone! :D
     

    Attached Files:

  19. Bentley

    Bentley Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,249
    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2012
    Location:
    Kelowna B.C, Canada
    No throwing it in the water? :(
     
  20. adirondak5

    adirondak5 Wood Hoarder Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,897
    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2009
    Location:
    Long Island NY
    Nice job Rick , happy New Year
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.