Show me the way to go ohm

Discussion in 'Music to Your Ears' started by Aristeas, Aug 9, 2020.

  1. Aristeas

    Aristeas TDPRI Member

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    Question for anyone with the knowhow.

    Can I attach 6 ohm speakers to my 8 ohm output stereo setup?

    Without damage that is..

    Thanks.
     
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  2. 24 track

    24 track Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    certain amps have a +/- on the output , if your amp does not or was not designed to take a lesser out put imedence you can cause damage, with out knowing what equipment you have and its out put rating there is a possibility of damage , unless you have a high end amp that allows for lesser inpedence or rated at 4-8 ohm output

    6 ohms is a weird rating most amps rate at 2-4-8-16 ohm and home stereo usually 8 ohm

    I have a marshall cab with 2X12 celestians in mono mode it is a 4 ohm 200 watt cab , but in stereo it is 8 ohms a side at 100watts each
     
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  3. suthol

    suthol Friend of Leo's

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    In a word no, unless you want to let the expensive smoke out

    Knowing where most stuff is made these days it will be metric smoke and you guys only seem to deal in imperial so it will be both expensive and hard to come by
     
  4. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    A SS amp commonly runs at 8ohms or 4 ohms without changing anything, so 6ohms would be fine, but we don't know your amp.
    Like rated 100w @ 4ohms or 50w @ 8ohms.
    The amp should say that, whatever it is.

    Do the speaker say 6ohms on them?
    Or did you measure the dcr resistance?
    A measured 6ohms resistance is generally 8ohm impedance.
     
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  5. Aristeas

    Aristeas TDPRI Member

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    Thanks for the help guys, although some of it still leaves me mystified.

    The Amp is an old TEAC JC50 stereo. It's rated 190 watts at 8 ohms.

    The speakers I'm looking at are 3 way Sony ss7200 rated 70 watts at 6 ohm.

    I'm looking to upgrade from my current speakers which are 2-way 8 ohm.
     
  6. DougM

    DougM Friend of Leo's

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    It should be fine as long as you don't turn it up all the way. Most amps have protection circuits that will shut them down before the power amp section fries. But, if the amp is 190 watts and the speakers are rated at 70 watts, then if you turn it up too loud, you'll likely fry the speakers, or your ears, before the amp.
     
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  7. DougM

    DougM Friend of Leo's

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    After doing some more research on what a Teac JC50 is, it's one of those cheap all in one plastic turntable, amp, cassette deck, speaker combos sold in dept. stores like Sears, K-Mart, and Macy's, and is surely not really 190 watts, but it should be ok with those speakers at reasonable volume levels.
     
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  8. rangercaster

    rangercaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    Personally, I never believe a manufacturer rating ...

    They tend to lie to boost sales ...

    Jus sayin ...
     
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  9. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    In that case the 190w on the back panel may refer to power consumption, not RMS WPC output!
     
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  10. Aristeas

    Aristeas TDPRI Member

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    My guess is its 50 watts - with that multiplied by 4 for the number of speaker connections - minus 10 for the fact
    that they're lying.
     
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  11. tubegeek

    tubegeek Friend of Leo's

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    If you put 5 dice into a cup and roll them you'll have just as accurate a wattage rating. Multiply them, add them, whatever you want.
     
  12. StevesBoogie

    StevesBoogie Tele-Meister

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    Here is what you need to consider when it comes to certain output ranges...


    Oh who am I kidding! I am only replying because I love the title of your thread! Very creative. Thank you for posting.
     
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  13. trxx

    trxx Tele-Afflicted

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    I suppose the underlying thing to note here is that when you run an amp with a lower impedance speaker, you are increasing how much current can pass through the amp. In other words, a lower impedance speaker has less resistance over it's frequency range than a higher impedance speaker, which will allow more current to flow through the amp. So the rated impedance for a given amp is in a roundabout way telling you how much current the amp can safely pass without burning up. So then, it can be fine to run a lower impedance speaker than what the amp is rated for but only at some given lower output limit. But you don't know what that lower output limit is, therefore you will be risking burning up the amp when running a lower impedance load than what the amp is rated for, which isn't a good idea. And even if you don't burn it up initially, you will be risking working the amp harder than what it was designed for, which could be detrimental in the long term to the amp's components which have their own electrical limits.

    We could spell it out using Ohm's law if you like, but the above should be enough to get the point across. An analogous way of saying it is that if you have a motor rated for a given speed, you increase the chance of burning up that motor when running it at higher speeds than it's rating, since it isn't able to dissipate the increased amount of heat in the same amount of time as when running at slower speeds. Where RPM is a quantity of rotations per minute relevant to a motor, current is a quantity of electrical charge flowing per second relevant to an amplifier.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2020
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