should i buy a 65 reissue

Discussion in 'Amp Central Station' started by mickg, Nov 1, 2009.

  1. mickg

    mickg Tele-Meister

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    sorry guys orig posted this in wrong forum...but...
    Hey guys. Went amp shopping today. Looked at the Hotrod deluxe, Blues Deluxe and 65DRRI. Sold on the clean sound in the 65. Liked the others too. Can always put a Bad Monkey pedal in front for a bit of drive i suppose as the 65 has no drive channel. Will NEVER use the vibe or tremolo sound but love a bit of verb.
    I play mainly country and blues and smaller venues. Will the 22 watt DRRI cut the mustard there do you think? Or will it break up too soon. I currently have a 40 watt Traynor and never push it very hard. Not sure what to do and just looking for some opinions i guess. I play teles most of the time. And the price diff dont bother me at all. What do you think?
     
  2. T Prior

    T Prior Poster Extraordinaire

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    Ok here is my thought, I finally got one..

    It seems that we have many threads with regard to comparing amps, for the most part we are not even comparing amps that are even in the same category.

    A 22 watt amp is simply that, a 22 watt amp, the DR is a great amp but I think it is not wise to compare it to a 40 watt HR Deluxe or a 40 watt something or other like that. Can you use them on a gig,? Sure .Will they both start to break up at some point ? Yes..

    But we really don't know what that point is until you are on the bandstand with a band and playing at volume.

    I would venture to say, from my own experiences (several decades on the bandstands) there is no one amp that can do all and fit all bandstand situations. I wish there was.

    If the 65 DR talks to you, get it. If you are on the gig and it works fine then all is well. If it seems to lack in the clean level department well then back to the drawing board.

    I've played gigs with kats using the 65 DR, they sounded great, but at volume it was all the exact same broke up tone. If you are ok with that then there ya go.

    For me, my own personal experience is that I use smaller amps( Classic 30's) for the small rooms and a Hot Rod Deville ( 60 watts) for the medium to larger rooms and it is not about volume but rather clean volume ( front pup chords)

    I think the 65DR is a great amp but I also think asking it to perform like a 40 watter or more may be asking too much.

    just my take.

    t
     
  3. vjf1968

    vjf1968 Poster Extraordinaire

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    With proper adjusting of the bias of the power tubes it will do the job and stay clean or you can replace the Jensen speaker with a more efficient one but it is still a 22 watt amp. You could utilize a mic in front of the amp to keep the clean tone optimal. Anything going from 15 watts and below is going to break up no matter what you do.

    As a side note, you can utilize both the "normal" and "vibe" channels on the DRRI by utilizing either a Barber Launch Pad or a Radial Big Shot ABY box to fix the phase polarity issue with black-face equipped with reverb amps.
     
  4. BiggerJohn

    BiggerJohn Friend of Leo's

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    I have a real FEI BFDR and I love it. Yeah, I put a better speaker in it and it's been well serviced and has good tubes. It's pretty loud for a DR, but still, as others have correctly pointed out, it is a 20 Watt amp. It has only so much clean headroom.

    It works just fine for smaller gigs or lower volume gigs. But if you are outdoors or at a bigger gig, unless you mike it, you will get buried. If you're playing in a louder band, you will need 40 Watts.
     
  5. Smoky Booroo

    Smoky Booroo Tele-Meister

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    I like a little crunch but sometimes I play outside and sometimes I play in little places with low ceilings and hardwood floors. I think if you're playing a lot, you probably need a 15watt, 22watt and a 40watt (or something like that)... I would love a twin or a bassman, but don't see why I would ever need that much power.
     
  6. eugenedunn

    eugenedunn Friend of Leo's

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    If you're a regular gigger and play in a wide variety of venue sizes, you need to decide if you're gonna take the trouble to mic your amp.

    If you wanna deal with the slight extra hassle of running a mic and then adjusting your mix on the PA, then a 15 or 22 watt amp is fine (even preferable).

    If you just like to plug in your pedals and fire it up, then in my experience, you need headroom to do country-style right. A minimum of 40 watts. Consider a Pro Reverb, Super Reverb, Allen Encore, Allen Old Flame, Bandmaster Reverb....the ultimate would be a Twin Reverb (but a lot of weight and might be too powerful at 85 watts?).
     
  7. strat a various

    strat a various Friend of Leo's

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    If you play smaller venues it's perfect. I use an old Twin, but when I'm travelling, and the producer rents an amp, for a small room, I rent a DRRI. Does everything a Blackface does, and used, about 1/4 of the price. I won't take blackface or tweed amps out to gigs, so the reissues are handy.
     
  8. beep.click

    beep.click Poster Extraordinaire

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    Yep, that says it all.
     
  9. grasspicker

    grasspicker Tele-Meister

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    I have a stock '65 DRRI...and a Sennheiser E109 mic.
    If the amp can't cut it by itself, I have a mic for the 'assist'.
    Up to this point, I have 'my amp' and my tone for whatever I need...
    I still have my '70's era Peavey Classic 50 for backup....
    If by chance I ever run across an old Fender 75 or an old Pro Reverb at the price I want to pay....then I may pick one up.
    Bottom line, I want an amp that delivers TONE and ain't gonna break my wallet OR my back.
    Signed, the 50 year old dude that loves his DRRI...
     
  10. nosuch

    nosuch Friend of Leo's

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    I played a DDRI once, at an open air. I cranked it up to get the dirt, but rolling down my guitar volume I had clean loud enough (I was miked for the public but not on the monitors), we are a blues band, not too loud, so it all depends ...
    the drri worked for me though on that occassion.
     
  11. Singin' Dave

    Singin' Dave Friend of Leo's

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    A couple random thoughts.....

    I would not buy a NEW DRRI, as SFDR's can be found for the same $ or less and IMO are better amps. Used, however, a DRRI is a heck of an amp for ~$600.

    Get a good efficient speaker (100db@1w@1m and up) and DRs can wail and deliver pretty darn good headroom.

    Not sure what gigs you guys are playing but I am surprised by the lack of folks micing their amp, specially in this era of relatively cheap, light and robust PA systems. I know there are times when micing might not be an option, but I would hope these situations are seen as less than optimal. You are going to get much more even coverage throughout a room/venue with your amp going through the mains a bit. Your bandmates likely prefer being able to set how much of you comes in their monitors vs. you forcing them to deal with a beam or a weak side cab signal etc. Keeping stage volume down can only help the band hear each other and perform better and smaller amps can help do that. But again, this in one man's opinion and the big amp vs. small amp topic has been beat to death.
     
  12. CrowePhil

    CrowePhil Tele-Meister

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    I play frequently at a blues jam in a big, boomy hall. I always take my DRRI, and tell the sound guy that I DON'T want to mic it. Everybody else is mic'd up, but I run my DRRI at about 5-6 for a little bite, and roll of the guitar volume unless I'm soloing. I have enough volume for that particular setting un-mic'd. I've played a few outdoor gigs where I should have mic'd the DRRI, but didn't. I am convinced that a DRRI can cut it in any situation if properly mic'd. I recently came to the conclusion that I will never NEED another amp for my needs. Of course, I'm amp shopping anyway.

    FWIW, my wife hates it when I play the DRRI at home, as opposed to my SCXD.
     
  13. Citizen_Insane

    Citizen_Insane Tele-Meister

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    I play on a 65DRRI and I don't think you'll have any trouble with volume. With single coils it'll stay clean until 5 or 6. That's pretty loud, about 80% as loud as a 40 watt amp.

    stupid cat's on keyboards...anyway,

    If you do get a DRRI, remember to clip the bright cap on the vib channel otherwise it'll sound like poo w/ any sort of overdrive pedal (buzzy like bees).
     
  14. davidge1

    davidge1 Friend of Leo's

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    Are the reissue Deluxe Reverbs not as powerful as the old ones? I played in a band with someone who had an original blackface DR and it was LOUD and clean. He'd replaced the original Fender speaker with a JBL so that might have had something to do with it, but his main problem with it was that he had to really crank the amp to get any real breakup at all... the sound guy was always telling him to turn down.
     
  15. Citizen_Insane

    Citizen_Insane Tele-Meister

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    I've never had mine above 4 at a gig (without an attenuator). I've have sound guys tell me to turn it down, and that's with the stock speaker unmiked with a full band with drums. Granted we're not a hard rock band or anything, more alt-country/electric-folk.
     
  16. strat a various

    strat a various Friend of Leo's

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    The stock speaker isn't very efficient. That's a good thing. Loud speakers aren't always the sweetest sounding. The small amp "giant killer" has been around since even before Randall Smith started souping up Princetons back in the day. They're impressive, but diminishing returns, IMO, after the initial loud first impressions.
    I don't think the reissue amp has any less power than the original blackface version. I remember them rarely being loud enough for the bars back in the 70s. Guys did routinely throw JBLs in them for a volume boost back then.
     
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