Short project: ear training, transcription, learning MuseScore (Roy Nichols content)

kctelegas

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I thought I would post a project I was working on the last couple of days. Although I’ve played bass since junior high, I’ve gotten serious about learning guitar only in the last year or so. I haven’t really read treble clef since I was a kid, and have never used TAB. This is my first attempt at learning a notation software.

In the past months I’ve worked on a couple of other longer Roy Nichols solos, but for this project I’ve chosen a 4 1/2 bar line from “Big City”; it is the second half of a solo break in which the fiddles play the first half. The other solos I was working on have a lot of bends and articulations that I still have to learn how to play and notate in TAB.

The first TAB is the fingering I used when initially transcribing from the recording. It stays in basically one position with a half step stretch in either direction. Conceptually, this seems to be a more scale-based approach. However this resulted in some awkward fingerings and some of the higher notes on the lower strings don’t have the same quality as when played on the higher strings.

The second TAB represents fingerings that work up and down the neck, rather than across it. In doing this one, I “discovered” single lines derived from chordal patterns—something that I keep coming across when reading about soloing (using chord tones rather than scales). These are represented in blue. In both cases these chord patterns are the relative minor of the chord of the measure. This lends a 6 chord tonality often used in western swing.

MuseScore is a free, open source program. I watched a couple of “getting started” videos and referred to the online manual when I ran across something I couldn’t figure out intuitively. I had the standard notation and the first TAB written out by hand, so just had to enter it into the software. Those two staves are linked, so I entered the line into the TAB and it auto populated the standard staff. The second TAB had to be unlinked to be able to put in different fingerings. If both TABs are linked, they both reflect the edits.

I spent maybe a couple of hours from download to what I have here. A lot of that time was figuring out formatting issues. I’ve proofread it and think (hope) it is correct.

Any tips or comments would be welcomed.



 

Harry Styron

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Good work! The only thing I would point out is that Nichols’s playing is syncopated, actually more of a dotted eighth note, sixteenth note pattern in the first two full bars. However, it’s not unusual to see such passages written in eighth notes, with or without an annotation that it is to be syncopated or swung.

Using MuseScore to translate tab to musical notation would have this result, because it would recognize eight notes in a measure to be eighth notes unless instructed otherwise. You overcame this default in the fourth bar by showing triplets in the tab.
 

trapdoor2

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I stopped linking my scores pretty early on. Just easier for me to work them seperately. My typical method is to input notation and when I'm satisfied with that, cut 'n' paste to Tab...then altering it as needed.

Musescore is the best software I've used so far for my needs. It still has its quirks, sometimes formatting can be maddening. Its help forum has always been excellent.
 

kctelegas

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Thanks for the feedback.
I was working under the Real Book assumption that eighths are swung--makes reading easier.
Funny--even with the Swing tool activated, the MIDI playback is SO vanilla; makes Lawrence Welk sound like Thelonius Monk by comparison.;)

One formatting issue I couldn't seem to get around is the beaming preferences. For my own ease of reading, I prefer rhythms to be notated according to the divisions of quarter notes (in 4/4). If you'll notice in my example, the standard notation is beamed as I prefer it--four groups of two eighth notes, rather than two groups of four. The linked TAB did not change when altering my preferences. The unlinked TAB is OK. Not really a big deal, but it would be nice if it were consistent.
 

trapdoor2

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Yes, beaming. :mad:

As long as I remember to finish the notation before I copy it into the tab staff, I'm good. Sorting out 200 measures of 8/16/32nd note beams, slurs, grace-notes and dynamic markings twice is a PITA. o_O
 

Jazzcaster21

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I thought I would post a project I was working on the last couple of days. Although I’ve played bass since junior high, I’ve gotten serious about learning guitar only in the last year or so. I haven’t really read treble clef since I was a kid, and have never used TAB. This is my first attempt at learning a notation software.

In the past months I’ve worked on a couple of other longer Roy Nichols solos, but for this project I’ve chosen a 4 1/2 bar line from “Big City”; it is the second half of a solo break in which the fiddles play the first half. The other solos I was working on have a lot of bends and articulations that I still have to learn how to play and notate in TAB.

The first TAB is the fingering I used when initially transcribing from the recording. It stays in basically one position with a half step stretch in either direction. Conceptually, this seems to be a more scale-based approach. However this resulted in some awkward fingerings and some of the higher notes on the lower strings don’t have the same quality as when played on the higher strings.

The second TAB represents fingerings that work up and down the neck, rather than across it. In doing this one, I “discovered” single lines derived from chordal patterns—something that I keep coming across when reading about soloing (using chord tones rather than scales). These are represented in blue. In both cases these chord patterns are the relative minor of the chord of the measure. This lends a 6 chord tonality often used in western swing.

MuseScore is a free, open source program. I watched a couple of “getting started” videos and referred to the online manual when I ran across something I couldn’t figure out intuitively. I had the standard notation and the first TAB written out by hand, so just had to enter it into the software. Those two staves are linked, so I entered the line into the TAB and it auto populated the standard staff. The second TAB had to be unlinked to be able to put in different fingerings. If both TABs are linked, they both reflect the edits.

I spent maybe a couple of hours from download to what I have here. A lot of that time was figuring out formatting issues. I’ve proofread it and think (hope) it is correct.

Any tips or comments would be welcomed.




Nice work! I transcribed the exact same line (it's an awesome line too) several months ago but had a hard time with the rhythms so I didn't notate it. I find the TAB part of MS a bit clunky at times but your's looks very good.

I use MS for all my scoring needs too and have uploaded a lot my various projects to the musescore.com
 




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