Shop-Built Thickness Sander

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Guitarnut, Apr 13, 2012.

  1. Engraver-60

    Engraver-60 Friend of Leo's

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    Not the entire SS, just the headstock.
     
  2. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

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    Same problem. I'd have to build a base or cabinet to house it. My hope is that the drum sander will stow away on a shelf under a bench. I can just pop it on the SS when needed.

    Thanks for the offer. :cool:
     
  3. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

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    At this point it's manual feed. I'm thinking about an edge guided sled that would allow an even feed rate and keep my hands clear. I haven't put anything on paper yet.


    Thanks for the tip on the bearings/rollers. :cool:
     
  4. Engraver-60

    Engraver-60 Friend of Leo's

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    Last year I saw my Dad's next door neighbor's homemade sander. I thought he was so clever, and then I discovered he'd used the plans from Shop Notes. You might want to look at that one for ideas on feed control.

    Here's a link to one some one made that's similar to the one I saw:
    http://www.woodworkstuff.net/EDTSander.html
     
  5. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

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    I sat down and put some real numbers to the plan. I needed to figure out how much room I actually have on the Shopsmith.

    I started by checking the height of the center line above the tubes. I laid a pice of 3/4" play on the tubes to have a firm spot under the bit. Have to make sure I add the 3/4" back in.

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    Then with the drum chucked up and level on the SS table, I checked the height at the top of the drum.

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    Next, I needed to measure the maximum distance from the yoke at one end to the headstock...that's what they call the motor housing...not sure why. That turns out to be 28.25" With the coupler being 5", I had to figure out how wide a sander I could place on the tubes. At first glance, my 20" drum was right on. But at that width, I didn't have any room to get the coupler on or off...it takes at least 1" of space between the drive hub and the end of the coupler.

    I tried various positions of the table and carriage to see if I could squeeze out a few more inches...but no go.

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    So, time for a little work on the plans. Putting actual numbers to some of the pieces will help me figure out how much I need to shorten the drum. it looks like 18" is a workable number and still plenty wide for my needs.

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  6. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

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    So, it's time to shorten the drum. after redrilling the axle and placing the hubs, I used a printout to mark 90° intervals on each end of the shortened PVC pipe. I also used tape to mark circles around the tube at the locations of the hub centers. I used a straight edge to connect the dots and ended up with marks at all hub locations for screws.

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    Remember the black lines I drew around the centers of the hubs on the lathe? This is why. I can clearly see that I'm on center. No guessing.

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    This time, since I needed the space, I flipped the outside hubs so the hardware is inside the pipe. This keeps everything inside the pipe. The drum is easy to disassemble since I didn't glue the hubs in. if I ever need to take it apart, i just reverse the assembly steps. Plus, there are no spinning bolts sticking out one the ends.

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    All ready to go. I don't think the countersinks out on the drum will be an issue since t will be covered with Velcro and sandpaper. I could easily fill them if needed.

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  7. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

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    Thanks. That has my wheels spinning a bit. It's not ideal but a hand cranked feed could be an easy addition.
     
  8. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

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    While in between coats on my Challenge build, I started playing with the idea of PVC gears. not for permanent usage but for a mock up of the height adjusters.

    I found the steel gear that I'll be using and it had a pretty listing of the specs. Diameter, pitch diameter, tooth pitch and so on. It's made for #40 roller chain so the teeth are pretty simple. i used a gear maker plugin in Lightwave to make a 3D version of the gear. Then, I rendered it flat to the camera and sized it in Illustrator.

    I have a hole saw that produces the exact sized plug I need so I cut out 5 and glued the printed gears to them with a little Misty Glue.

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    I made a temp work surface on the band saw so I would have a flat surface right up to the blade.

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    Then it was just a matter of following the printed edges. Here's one side of the teeth done.

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    And the other.

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    Then I cut slightly smaller discs to make hubs and trued them up on the lathe.

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    All glued up. Same process as the hubs for the drum. I'll put them on the lathe one more time and bevel the edges of the teeth as well as make sure they're all the same height.

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  9. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

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    After much waiting and planning, I've finally started building the frame for the sander. The planning was in design changes and the waiting was for bearings and abrasives to arrive.

    The biggest change in the design is the height adjustment. My chain driven design proved to be too expensive for this build so I adapted a few ideas from the ShopNotes design that mgdesigns posted. Thanks Mark.

    I gathered up parts for the pinch rollers and feed rollers too. I'm using 2" PVC pipe for the feed rollers and 1.5" for the pinch rollers.

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    I also found a great deal on bearings. I spent over $70 for the 4 bearings I used on my belt sander project. I got 10 of these for $65. Sweet! Same bearing, slightly different housing.

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    On to the frame. Since alignment from end to end of the sander is critical to keep the drum on a true center line, I cut the 2 sides and screwed them together. I'll do all operations with them like this so I produce mirror image pieces.

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  10. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

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    After adding a few frame pieces, here's the first test fit.

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    Plenty of room to mount the coupler.

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    After I was happy with the way it sat on the tubes, I reversed the setup and used the Shopsmith to drill the location of the main axle. Then, I screwed the 2 sides back together and drilled thru the other side.

    This is a good place to talk about the new design for height adjustment. The 5 vertical holes are coarse adjustment positions and you can see the scissor jack sitting on the front of the sander. This will be the fine adjustment...well, not this particular jack but I can easily build one out of wood and PVC that will be lighter.

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    With the axle position marked, I drilled it out to .500" and checked the fit of the drum and marked the bearing locations. It's a snug fit at this point. I'll drill the holes out to .750" after the bearings have been mounted and checked.

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    The next step was to drill small pilot holes at the bearing mount positions. These guided the Forstner bit for countersinking the tee nuts on the back side of the frame.

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    Since I bolted the hubs inside the drum, it's trapped at this point...no way to remove it without taking the sander completely apart. After I'm good with the alignment for everything, I'll cut slots above the axle ends so the entire assembly can be loosened and lifted up and out.

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    After trimming the other end of the axle, I set the sander frame in place and marked the axle cut for the coupler.

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    Using the drive hub that I made for the swing arm sander, I connected the sander to the Shopsmith. I'm going to check bearing alignment and do a live run test today...I'll have video later.

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  11. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Very Cool....
     
  12. Shepherd

    Shepherd Friend of Leo's

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    I can see the next thread title being "Shopmade Nuclear Fusion Generator".
    Very clever.
     
  13. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

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    Thanks GB!
     
  14. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

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    Thanks! I thought I would tackle a Shopsmith powered beer dispenser next. :p
     
  15. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

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    Live Run Test

    I still have a long way to go but it was nice to see it run.

     
  16. PapaLion

    PapaLion Tele-Afflicted

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    I like making tools too. It can slow you down to have a glitch somewhere. Often best to let the problem simmer for awhile, then the solution sometimes pops up or is offered by someone looking at the rig.

    Making the ends of steel, in your case, might not change a thing, it looks very stable using the ShopSmith. It would not be hard to find a plasma cutting outfit and give them the end plans and get it back in 1/4" ,or even 3/16" mild steel. If a power supply was part of the unit I'd go that way. Welding up bracing and sub units as needed > via 125v or better yet a 220V MIG with gas would work fine.

    Do you figure to contact cement or glue sand paper on the drums?

    Micro thickness adjustment is a key, you know that. A seperately switched variable speed power feed for the lower belt is on the one I borrow... very kool and spendy$$$ :) I believe it a simple DC motor with a belt and pulley driven.. very slowly. These can blank a fretboard so nicely if the thing slowly feeds and you can cut just a hair off the surface at a time.

    I did have one small light bulb come on as I enjoyed your build. Maybe? there are large geared rolling drum set ups like this in large copiers? Next time I see one at an auction, covered in dirt and auctioned for $5 I'll take a looksee.

    I hope you will continue to post on this, it is a good idea.
     
  17. Engraver-60

    Engraver-60 Friend of Leo's

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    Mark: How are planning to control the feed through? The one I had referenced before had a crank mechanism and a sandpaper belt to grip and regulate the feed of the stock. My dad's neighbor got a small clock motor to actually turn the geared crank instead of hand cranking, because he did long panels (sometimes over 10' long). Just curious. Thanks
     
  18. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

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    A steel frame would be nice but the real thrill for me it make the tool myself. Since I don't have a plasma cutter... :p

    I bought fabric backed abrasive rolls. My hope is to devise a clip on either end to hold the paper. Short of that, I'll go with misty Glue.

    I recently parted out a treadmill that had some nice rollers, bushings and a 2hp DC perm magnet motor. Not sure what I';ll use them for. V2 of the feed on this sander may incorporate the rollers. Copiers might have some useful items in them, too.

    I'll keep you posted as things happen. :cool:
     
  19. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

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    Hey Mark. I have decide to go with a manual feed like the Shopnotes version for now. I might add a power feed later. My upcoming post explains some of my plan.

    I'm also working on an updated model. I'll have new renders up tomorrow.
     
  20. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

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    This all happened before the video so it's out of sequence but the details are worth showing.

    The pinch rollers are 1.5" PVC with glued in hubs. They will be flanked by PVC washers that will hold in the compression springs. The axles, rollers and washers will be free spinning. the only fasteners on the axle will be cotter pins to limit left/right movement.

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    The manual feed belt will use rollers made of 2" PVC. the belt is a 16" x 48" 100 grit. Since it's only 16" wide in an 18" roller path, I made hubs that will keep the belt centered...the large disks will act as flanges against the edge of the belt. And outside of the flanges are disks that act as spacers to make up the additional 18" width. The hubs will be glued in.

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    The compression springs are a combination of items I found at HD. Each one has two springs that combined provide about 30lbs of pressure when compressed...if I understand the specs correctly. The mount is a 1/4" bolt thru a PVC bushing with a nut below. The other ends of the springs ride on the axle and are held in place by the PVC washers.

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    Last edited: Apr 23, 2012
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