Share your coolest production tricks for rock music

Discussion in 'Recording In Progress' started by Marquee Moon, Dec 12, 2019.

  1. Marquee Moon

    Marquee Moon Tele-Holic

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    This one I picked up from an old interview from CCR and I believe the beatles did this aswell. Slow down the recording a bit, then record the backing vocals, then speed it back up to the song's original speed. This will make the backing vocals sound other wordly tight. Because they worked with tape and the pitch would modulate, i don't believe they slowed it down too much. I've done this with my daw and it made it sound really cool.

    What are some gems you have picked up over the years?
     
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  2. kbold

    kbold Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Cool trick.
    These days, with digital, you can slow down without the pitch change.
    This is something I'll have to experiment with to "tighten" vocals. Just a pinch I think would work well.

    I suspect this is a common trick, like those youtubers shredding at low speed then speeding it up to make them look like super speed shredders.
     
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  3. TokyoPortrait

    TokyoPortrait Tele-Afflicted

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    Hi.

    I think the coolest thing I’ve figured out is to go back and undo / turn off most of what I've done to ‘enhance’ the mix. :)

    I’m only half joking too. Painful realisation.

    Pax/
    Dean
     
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  4. rze99

    rze99 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Record near identical strummed acoustic guitar parts and pan them hard left and hard right. Especially wonderful if the tuning is very slightly different. lush.
     
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  5. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Poster Extraordinaire

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    Probably everyone knows this.....Queen would have each of the three singing members (Freddie, Roger, and Brian) each sing ALL THREE harmony parts in a passage, and put everything together. Because each singer was very good, it made for very close (but not quite exact) NINE voice harmony. If there was another harmony part, (four part, five part, etc) they would then have all three sing those additional parts. That's why their harmonies are so "dense" and lush.
     
  6. kbold

    kbold Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Behind every joke is a painful reality.
    If I'm recording (mind you, little experience) I like to record as clean and clear as possible: then I enhance later.
    I think as you add layers; what sounded good by itself sounds better clean when layered.

    Undo is the shiny button.
     
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  7. studio

    studio Poster Extraordinaire

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    My Chris Squire Bass Guitar Whiz Bang:

    1. Record Bass Track

    2. Copy to another track

    3. Use 2nd Track as a mids/highs only track. Cutoff all low frequencies leaving mids and highs.

    4. Add Chorus or Overdrive to 2nd Track.

    5. Blend Track 1 and Track 2 together. Lows and highs respectively.

    6. Use 2nd Track in between Vocal lines like fills.

    7. Instant Chris Squire!
     
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  8. studio

    studio Poster Extraordinaire

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    Isn't it still only 3 part harmony if they are
    only harmonizing the same 3 notes?

    I know, I know, wrong forum.
     
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  9. Carcinogen

    Carcinogen TDPRI Member

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    If you don’t have a good sounding room or enough mics to get a good room sound for drums, you can drape a garden hose around the drum set and tape an SM57 to one end, and then compress the **** out of it for a boomy room effect with very little cymbal bleed.

    You can also re-amp a snare by laying it upside down over a guitar cab and running a heavily gated snare track through the cab. Mic it however you want.
     
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  10. mkdaws32

    mkdaws32 Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    I’ll often double pads or other background type tracks, pan hard left and right, detune one side a few cents and delay the same side about 20ms. Creates a very wide sound without modulating or phasing, while maintaining good mono compatibility. Leaves a lot of room for lead vox an instruments around the centre.

    Sometimes I’ll do the bass trick suggested above with the same widening trick on the high passed track (resulting in three bass tracks in total). Makes a wide sounding bass that stays centred below about 250hz (the frequency where i apply the high pass filter).
     
  11. Marquee Moon

    Marquee Moon Tele-Holic

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    I think what he is saying is he would have them sing each harmony part together. So they would all be singing the same notes in a given over dub. That makes it sounds really thick. It's still 3 parts, but there would be nine voices on the track.
     
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  12. Geoff738

    Geoff738 Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    And the longer the hose the more delayed the sound will be. There is a video of Sylvia Massy demonstrating this and some other unorthodox ideas, none of which I can remember offhand.

    Cheers,
    Geoff
     
  13. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Poster Extraordinaire

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    Your point is absolutely correct......it's still three part harmony, (or however many parts they used) but it was like a nine voice CHOIR singing in three (or whatever) parts. Made for a very dense texture.
    Why do you say "wrong forum"?.....do you think we have a "math" forum here? ;)
     
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  14. Frodebro

    Frodebro Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I like to double dirty guitar parts with a cleaner guitar (usually a Tele, of course!), which adds clarity and better definition. I also typically don’t use a lot of distortion on the dirty parts, as I learned playing live that a little goes a long way in a mix. I always high pass the guitars at around 70Hz and low pass between 4kHz-5kHz.

    Another ritual for me is running a gain plugin on every track, set to -6dB as a starting point. I utilize automation fairly often, and it keeps things cleaner for me if the faders are all at zero.

    Lastly, I will go into each guitar track after the part is to my liking and cut out all the sections where I’m not playing to eliminate any noise from amp hiss or whatever. I could just use gates, but I prefer to do it this way as I know exactly when the signal is cut and when it’s not.
     
  15. TokyoPortrait

    TokyoPortrait Tele-Afflicted

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    Hi again.

    Someone above mentioned panning double tracked guitars. Probably most know this already, but you can set up an aux for each part and add reverb to that, and set to 100% wet, pan each back in to the opposite side (left guitar has right guitar’s reverb, etc.). For a mix that’s not too dense and has some space, it can thicken up and glue together the two guitar parts.

    I like the bass ideas above too. Sometimes I’ll do the same bass part but in different positions on the neck (once or more) to get ‘higher’ and ‘lower’ versions, EQ them various ways, and change their relationship via the faders at different parts of the song - sometimes just the low one, others about even, other points with more of the ‘high’ one, etc. Whatever works.

    Some songs that have busier bass lines, I’ll also make a second bass track that just thumps along with a single root note under each chord in the progression. Lands with the start of the guitar chord and sustains for about the same length. Mixed low so you don’t really notice it until it’s removed, it really is more of a guitar part, adding low oomph to each chord. Has to suit the song of course.

    Pax/
    Dean
     
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  16. Geoff738

    Geoff738 Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    On a slow strummy or bashing power chords type part, double it whether by playing or just copy in your Daw and pan left and right. Compress one side so that as one side starts to fade the other side is pulled up by the compressor. Can create a bit of movement.

    And as I always bang on about here, arrangement. Static arrangements with the same instrumentation that just scroll through intro, verse, (pre) chorus, verse, chorus, verse, bridge, chorus etc. gets boring fast. Mix things up. Add elements to the chorus, or make the soundscape wider, or change the eq. Something, anything. Try reverb sent from the guide vocal/track. All kinds of possibilities. The song will know.
    Cheers,
    Geoff
     
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  17. beyer160

    beyer160 Friend of Leo's

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    I always put up a "stupid mic" while tracking drums. Take the crappiest dynamic mic you have, put it in a stupid place (facing the control room window was popular, I've also miked the ceiling of a 16' room and the inside of an adjacent tile bathroom), then compress the snot out of it. Mixed in slightly under the regular drum tracks it's good for adding a little "room" to the sound without being overbearing, it's also cool to use as an effect (in intros or in sections of the song where the guitars drop out but the drums keep going).
     
  18. kbold

    kbold Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    I read an interview (or article) saying Jack Bruce would prefer to record the bass track last.
    He claimed it was the best way of not having the bass getting in the road of vocals or other instruments (or something to that effect).

    Sounds like a valid point of view. (Who's to argue with Jack?)
     
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  19. Peegoo

    Peegoo Tele-Holic

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    If you need weird/wacky/trippy guitar tones, try plugging in a stomp box backwards and twiddle the controls around. I have an old Thomas Organ Crybaby that will do authentic UFO (Theremin) sweeps when hooked up backwards. My DOD FX75 flanger from the late 1970s does ring mod-like stuff.

    Another cool thing for weird guitar tones is to weave a straightened paper clip through the strings close to the bridge saddles. With mild overdrive and delay it sounds like underwater guitar. You can also tape a piece of foil across the saddles and get fairly authentic sitar sounds from an electric guitar.
     
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  20. TokyoPortrait

    TokyoPortrait Tele-Afflicted

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    Hi.

    Good point. I was thinking about this (in a less focused way) the other day.

    I was listening to the Rolling Stones and thinking about how each section of the current and last few songs (can’t quite recall which now) was different, with the changes often coming in part way through a section. I remember thinking how all that work, often subtle, really made the songs work.

    And that caused me to reflect on the easy cut and past, copy a part over nature of working with a DAW, and how I need to stop being lazy and put the work in.

    Pax/
    Dean
     
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