SG Junior or SG Special

Jeru

Tele-Holic
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Nov 17, 2006
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Chicago
My vote is for a two-pickup guitar wired as a Junior.

I mainly play a tele live. I have found that (for me) having separate
controls for each pickup is too much for me in a live situation. Of my
three SG-type guitars, all have two pickups but two of them are wired
up as Juniors.

The Esque-G Supermutt at left is a 'Silvertone by Samick' modified basically
beyond recognition. The ~blue/green one started life as a Gibson SG3, a
short-lived model with three pickups and two knobs. The owner before me
refinished it pretty poorly and then dumped it (to me) on CL. I added the
P90s and knobs and that's about it. It's a really nice guitar that can take
to gigs and/but don't need to feel precious about.


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kookaburra

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I gotta say, I did, in the 90s, have an old early 60s Epi Coronet with the single metal cover dog-ear and a 90's Hamer TV special with the Duncan soapbar stacks, and the Coronet sounded sooo much better that I soured on the Hamer. That guitar sounded great.

The P90 Hamer Specials of that era had very hot ceramic mag Duncans. Great if you wanted that, but yeah, not the trad P90 sound. I've changed them out in the two P90 Hamers that I currently own for lower output models.
 

pi

Tele-Meister
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bay area, CA
When you have a Jr you're obligated to say things like "you can get so many sounds with just a tone and volume control".

While other guitars also have tone and volume controls, you don't get to talk about them.

So if you like talking about knobs get a Jr, otherwise get the Special.
 
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tiktok

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Oregon coast
I've got two SG-X's, a P90 SG Jr, and a P90 SG Classic (two pickups), and they're just all different types of great. The Jr has a notably thinner body than the others, and has the wraparound bridge and vintage style tuners, so it's also notably lighter, whereas the others all have TOM and modern tuners.

If you want to find out about the Jr "thing", get a Junior. Even though, in theory, you can just play on the bridge pickup on a two pickup guitar, there's a psychological difference to knowing that you've got two knobs and your fingers to get your point across, period.

If you're like most folks, get the Special.
 

jrblue

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IMO the Junior is a onbe-trick pony. I had one, loved the simplicity, clean build, and playability but the tone was really limited and the fundamental sound is not always easy to use in varied playing situations. If you like to change guitars and if you want one for that "Mississippi Queen" throaty growl, then great. But I just got bored, likely because the straight Junior tone was not really wonderful for a fair amount of the ensemble stuff I do. I'm not into whipping out a bunch of different guitars.
 

Maguchi

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Lalaland
I want a Junior for some reason. But the special has a neck pickup and is only $100 more or so. What would you do?
I'd get a Special. I use my neck pickup and middle position a lot, so to me it's just what I've gotten used to. However there is a real attraction about single pickup guitars. And I agree with Jr. and Esquire owners that single pickup guitars have less magnetic pull and the pickup sounds great. I also like the simplicity of dialing in a sound with only your guitar's tone and volume knob.

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AlbertaGriff

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They're both super nice. I read through this whole thread and I have no idea how you'll use any of this to make a decision. Specials are nice. Jrs are nice. Both are cool. I'd go with whichever one you like the look of best.

Sounds like it's the Pelham Blue SG Special. I like the look of those too, and if a deal popped up, I'd probably buy one.

I have a 2018 LP Jr and it's awesome.

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xjazzy

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Portugal
I wanted a Jr but the Special was a lot cheaper and I had already sold a Firebird I because I was missing the middle position so...

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SixStringSlinger

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Suggestion: Everyone who refers to a single-pickup guitar as a "one-trick pony" has to refer to 2-pickup guitars as 2 or 3-trick ponies as switching dictates.

Tele's with a series mod are 4-trick ponies.

Strats can be anywhere from 3 to 7-trick ponies.

Whether coil splits, series/parallel on humbuckers, coil tap etc. count as a full pony is open for debate.
 

Bruxist

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Suggestion: Everyone who refers to a single-pickup guitar as a "one-trick pony" has to refer to 2-pickup guitars as 2 or 3-trick ponies as switching dictates.

Tele's with a series mod are 4-trick ponies.

Strats can be anywhere from 3 to 7-trick ponies.

Whether coil splits, series/parallel on humbuckers, coil tap etc. count as a full pony is open for debate.

My three pickup SG had a rotary switch so it was a 6 trick pony, which is a good band name.

The Danelectro 3 pickup DC I got for my wife has a rotary and a blow switch, so it is a 7 trick pony. However, one of those tricks is "sound like shirt."
 

bettyseldest

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I rarely play the bridge pickup on my Tele's and cannot imagine owning an Esquire, but I love a Junior. The only guitar Iwould consider replacing my Gordon Smith GS1 with would be the same guitar fitted with a P90. If it were your ony guitar then there may be that the case for the Specialbecomes stronger, but for meit is the Junior. I'm not sure that there is much logic in the matter, you need to try both and make your mind up, or better still borrow them for a few weeks.

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SixStringSlinger

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My three pickup SG had a rotary switch so it was a 6 trick pony, which is a good band name.

The Danelectro 3 pickup DC I got for my wife has a rotary and a blow switch, so it is a 7 trick pony. However, one of those tricks is "sound like shirt."

My Strat with an S1 switch is a 10-trick pony, while my Jet King with independent series/parallel switching for each humbucker is a 12-trick pony!

EDIT: Of course, this logic makes your typical Esquire a 3-trick pony, and mine (with a coil-tapped pickup) a six-trick pony. And given that I have a no-load tone pot I can engage/disengage in the middle position on either side of the tap...an 8-trick pony?

This metaphor is falling apart.
 




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