Seymour Duncan Broadcaster

Wyatt

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IF a pickup is labeled as a "Broadcaster" and uses A5 rod magnets, it is in not a replica of the original 1950 Leo Fender "Broadcaster" pickup.

AFAIK, the SD Broadcaster has always been based on a late-'50s/early-'60s PU (A5, 42awg, ~8K ohms, no clue on windings) and I assume when he picked the name 40+ years ago it was just something "Telecaster-adjacent" that had a good hook. People didn't take everything so literal back then. It wasn't an attempt to a 1950 repro, I'm not sure if SD have ever offered A3.

But, Fender seemed to have the same idea, recently calling a A5/42 bridge PU, that they paired with their Twisted Tele neck PU, the "Broadcaster" bridge PU as well. Not claiming it was 1950 spec, they just used it as a name.
 
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Twang Tone

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AFAIK, the SD Broadcaster has always been based on a late-'50s/early-'60s PU (A5, 42awg, ~8K ohms, no clue on windings) and I assume when he picked the name 40+ years ago it was just something "Telecaster-adjacent" that had a good hook. People didn't take everything so literal back then. It wasn't an attempt to a 1950 repro, I'm not sure if SD have ever offered A3.

But, Fender seemed to have the same idea, recently calling a A5/42 bridge PU, that they paired with their Twisted Tele neck PU, the "Broadcaster" bridge PU as well. Not claiming it was 1950 spec, they just used it as a name.
Agreed.

Folks get too hung up on exacting specs, while the SD Broadcaster has been quietly selling in the hundreds of thousands over the past 3-4 decades.

I couldn't care less how accurate it is - what it is, is a fine bridge Tele pickup. I've used many SD Broadcasters down the years, ripping out that plastic-based bridge pickup from various MIM 50s Classics and retro-fitting a good SD Broadcaster pickup in there to bring the guitar to life.
 
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Rob DiStefano

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Agreed.

Folks get too hung up on exacting specs, while the SD Broadcaster has been quietly selling in the millions over the past 3-4 decades.

I couldn't care less how accurate it is - what it is, is a fine bridge Tele pickup. I've used many SD Broadcasters down the years, ripping out that plastic-based bridge pickup from various MIM 50s Classics and retro-fitting a good SD Broadcaster pickup in there to bring the guitar to life.

Accuracy matters to some folks. Calling an A5/42 Tele/Esquire a "Broadcaster" is simply wrong on too many levels and and if yer building a replica 1950 Fender Electric Spanish Guitar, or a replica 1950 Fender Esquire, or a replica 1950 Fender Broadcaster, or a replica 1951 Fender "Nocaster" that's NOT the pickup to stick in the bridge ... unless accuracy doesn't matter. Just another bean counter marketing ploy that does yeoman disservice to customers, particularly those wishing to build a true 1950 replica Fender guitar.
 
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Twang Tone

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Accuracy matters to some folks. Calling an A5/42 Tele/Esquire a "Broadcaster" is simply wrong on too many levels and and if yer building a replica 1950 Fender Electric Spanish Guitar, or a replica 1950 Fender Esquire, or a replica 1950 Fender Broadcaster, or a replica 1951 Fender "Nocaster" that's NOT the pickup to stick in the bridge ... unless accuracy doesn't matter. Just another bean counter marketing ploy that does yeoman disservice to customers, particularly those wishing to build a true 1950 replica Fender guitar.

Fair enough. I get that accuracy matters to some folks.

I'm more concerned with how does it SOUND? Is the sound what you want to hear?

And the folks in the first 3 rows at a gig don't care whether your pickup is A3 or A5 or 42 gauge or 43 gauge - they just want you to play something good!
 

Rob DiStefano

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Fair enough. I get that accuracy matters to some folks.

I'm more concerned with how does it SOUND? Is the sound what you want to hear?

And the folks in the first 3 rows at a gig don't care whether your pickup is A3 or A5 or 42 gauge or 43 gauge - they just want you to play something good!

Now yer making good sense, and I agree to always go for what matters most. Shooting for aesthetics (a replica 1950 Fender build) may not deliver "the sound" one requires. The elephant in the room is that the range of tone from like-component 1950 Fender pickup builds is all over the map, as evidenced in Nacho's "The Blackguard" tome. To say one wants "1950 Fender tone" would mean all those bridge and neck pickups were wound alike ... not at all true.

BUT if replica accuracy matters, sound *may* suffer going the replica route.

The Guitar Attributes List, in my prioritized order ...

1. playability
2. sound
3. aesthetics
4. money
 

Rob DiStefano

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I guess an old 50s Fender lap steel pickup was the same thing.
Yessir. For the very most part, any and all 1950 Leo Fender lap steel pickups and guitar bridge pickups used 43AWG coil wire over A3 rod magnets. The Champion Lap Steel pickup is the 1950 Fender Guitar bridge pickup, just in a slightly different bobbin footprint.
 




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