Series Wiring using 3-Way Switch

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by teleview, Apr 5, 2020.

  1. teleview

    teleview TDPRI Member

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    I'm interested in rewiring my Telecaster 3-way switch to series vice parallel wiring (will not use 4-way switch).
    Looking at a SD 4-Way Switch schematic there is an IMPORTANT note explaining "the neck pickup's cover must be ground with a separate wire (you will need to disconnect it from the black wire first). I don't understand this at all. Are there any resources, either photos or other schematics that explains this
    further? I'm confused by the SD schematic as it only shows one black wire from the neck pickup to the swith but no "disconnected" wire or any wirefrom the cover (and where do you connect that to)?
    Thanks.
     
  2. LebanonOz

    LebanonOz TDPRI Member

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    This shows how to ground the Neck pickup cover with a separate wire...
     
  3. SPUDCASTER

    SPUDCASTER Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    With the series mod with a metal covered Tele pickup. You will need to separate the cover ground from two wire configuration and add the third wire.

    www.deaf-eddie.net/drawings/tele-series.jpg

    This way you can keep the parallel and the series options.

    Deaf Eddie's site is a great resource and also Phostenix site at Gear Nuts. Someone posted the Phostenix site here if you do a search.

    Welcome to the forum!
     
  4. Bendyha

    Bendyha Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I just did a 5 way switch wire-up yesterday for a freind. The first three posistions are standard tele, and 4 and five are both series, one in phase, and the other out of phase. I'm not to sure what the pickups are, but the neck has a DC resistance of 11K2, and the bridge 6K. The neck pickup is surprisingly full and powerfull sounding, and the bridge not to hot and ice-pickish. The standard parallel setting has a very broad accoustic sounding touch to it.
    The real surprise was the series out of phase setting, it really bowled me over, quacky and scooped, but still had enough bottom end to not be to thin, and certainly not a nasal tone. The in phase series, didn't imress me as much. Much like the neck pickup with a bit more power and a touch more top end...something that a slight adjustment to the amps setting could equally as well have accomplished.
     
  5. teleview

    teleview TDPRI Member

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    Thanks to all who have responded. Another question ... why do I need to ground the metal cover in the first place? Also, any wiring diagrams for just a 3-way switch wired in series (I'm not looking for a 4-way with option of either series or parallel)? Thanks again.
     
  6. SPUDCASTER

    SPUDCASTER Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Geo likes this.
  7. Geo

    Geo Friend of Leo's

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    The bridge cover is grounded to prevent unwanted hum. Without it there will be a hum sound just like
    when the pickups are not grounded.


    [​IMG]
     
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  8. tele_savales

    tele_savales Tele-Holic

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    You can use a push-pull pot. I have 2 guitars set up for phase reversal w a push pull on the tone pot, and wiring a push pull to engage series wiring is easier than the out of phase wiring.. Mojotone has super hi quality Bournes push pulls on closeout for 2.99! I got 4.

    That said, just using a 4 way switch like everyone else does is WAY less of a hassle than a push pull.
     
  9. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    @Geo, your switch isn't wired correctly. Move the blue series jumper over to the left one lug, on the top row.
     
  10. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I like this one better. No lifted grounds...


    Screen Shot 2020-04-06 at 12.27.34 AM.png
     
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  11. Tuxedo Poly

    Tuxedo Poly Tele-Afflicted

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    This is a slightly altered Phostenix version.

    Tele_3-Way_Series_Mod.jpg
     
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  12. tele_savales

    tele_savales Tele-Holic

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    @moosie what is the last and final word in your opinion of needing a ground jumper between pots if you have a metal control plate? I was fiddling around this weekend and looked at around 20 Tele diagrams, 90 percent show it, the rest don't.
     
  13. Tuxedo Poly

    Tuxedo Poly Tele-Afflicted

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    My 2 cents
    In most cases it is completely unnecessary to ground the tone pot, ff you check the Fender Telecaster service diagrams none of them has the tone pot grounded with a soldered link.
    IMHO it is safer to common all the grounds on the volume pot as Fender do with modern Tele wiring. The American Vintage and Originals are a different matter, they have the output ground soldered to the tone pot and rely on the control plate for ground continuity presumably for the sake of being historically correct. If either pot becomes loose you have problems.
     
  14. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    With a metal control plate, you don't NEED it, not if your pots are tight. But...

    An explicit, dedicated, soldered connection is always the best solution, IMO. I've said this before... I've had perfectly conductive metal control plates become non-conductive because the plating started to flake around where the lockwasher cut into the plating. We want the lockwasher, so the pot stays tight. But once the plating comes loose, it appears that it can interrupt connectivity. "Appears", because I'm not sure why a bit more flakes of plating stacked up would be that much less conductive than the regular plating, but there it is. I've seen it twice, now.

    Also, if you do choose to rely on the implicit control plate conductivity, wire it so you only rely on it for shielding, not for signal. If you lose connectivity, whatever's attached to the tone pot shell will be disconnected. If it's nothing, then no worries, you just have an ungrounded pot shell. If it's the tone cap, then you have a non-functioning tone circuit (open circuit). If it's the output jack... you have a dead guitar.
     
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  15. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Head slap. Leave it to Phostenix. I wire humbuckers like this all day long, but I didn't see it out of that context...
     
  16. alathIN

    alathIN Tele-Holic

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    This is not technically correct but I like to use the terms "signal ground" (or signal negative) and "earth ground."
    OP's question is about separating the "signal ground" lead from the pickup from the lead that connects the pickup cover to "earth ground."
    It's wrong but it helps me keep stuff separate in my head.

    When I made my Strat I was tempted to use the foil backing on the pickguard as a common ground. But it just didn't feel right to mix shielding and signal in that way. I have a lot of superstitious beliefs about ground schemes :D

    There is another option - if you happen to get a bridge pickup that has separate "signal ground" and "earth ground" you can make it the pickup that switches phase. That's how I did my tele.
     
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  17. tele_savales

    tele_savales Tele-Holic

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    Got it.
     
  18. tele_savales

    tele_savales Tele-Holic

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    There's a whole series of these articles and they're great. I'd compare and contrast any diagrams with others on the internet just because.
    https://www.premierguitar.com/articles/Preparing_Your_Tele_for_Future_Mods
     
  19. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I do the same. I think of them as signal common, and wall (socket) common. It's a must when building an elevated / isolated amp circuit.

    I don't see it as a critical issue, though, with guitar circuitry. Except as I mentioned, to avoid relegating the all-important signal path to a hopefully-connected conductive convenience that is the control plate.

    Since there's no voltage to speak of, there's nothing to isolate.
     
  20. teleview

    teleview TDPRI Member

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    Thanks to everyone who replied. I've replied to Moosie with one last question. Cheers
     
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