Series/Parallel Switching on Braided Cable

Discussion in 'Just Pickups' started by fidopunk, Jan 23, 2020.

  1. fidopunk

    fidopunk Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    I’ve got a bass set up for VVT (like a Jazz Bass) but the pickups are like your typical Gibson’s— shielded cable that’s soldered to the pot backs. Is there a way I can implement the typical Jazz Bass push/pull pot for series/parallel WITHOUT converting the pickup to three or four convictions?

    Meaning can I solder on a short lead to the pickup shield and then appropriately heat shrink the rest so that the shield doesn’t ground out in the cavity? Am I a lunatic?
     
  2. dogmeat

    dogmeat Tele-Afflicted

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    meaning the "ground" side of the coil wire is the shield?? I think thats what you are saying. and yes, soldering a pigtail to the shield to make it series switchable should work. and as you say, the shield will need to be insulated
     
  3. fidopunk

    fidopunk Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    Thanks— Yes that’s what I was saying. Sorry if I wasn’t more clear. And thanks, it’s what I was hoping to hear.
     
  4. rigatele

    rigatele Tele-Afflicted

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    Metal covers are not too common on basses, but if you do that you have to make sure that, if the "floating" pickup's cover is conductive that it's not connected to guitar ground. Also no screws connecting any grounded part of the pickup, to guitar ground.
     
  5. fidopunk

    fidopunk Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    That is an excellent point. Yes, they’re two conductor Lollar Thunderbird pickups. This is the input I’m looking for before I break out the ol’ soldering iron. Now to break out the ol’ volt-ohm meter.
     
  6. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Sorry, I don't see how this works. Solder a pigtail to the shield/common, so you can connect it to a switch, which will conditionally disconnect that pigtail from ground? Either lift it (series) or make it hot (phase)?

    Once it disconnects from ground, your pickup frame is no longer grounded.

    Same reason Tele covers need a third wire.

    Or am I missing something.
     
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  7. rigatele

    rigatele Tele-Afflicted

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    Those pickups have a metal cover. I think the screws just go into wood, so they get their shielding ground from the braided side of the cable. However the way you plan to use them, in series mode one of the pickups covers will:
    1) not have an electrostatic ground shield any more
    2) the cover will induce signal voltage into the output if you touch them with your fingers

    That's why you have to pay attention to Moosie above. Usually you have to disassemble the pickup to convert a 2 wire to 2+ground (3 wire). Some pickups like the Tele neck are easy because everything you need for that is exposed.
     
  8. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Those were my assumptions, yes. It's how Gibson PAFs are organized.
     
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