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Separated by a common language (Brit-speak question)

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by soulgeezer, Jun 26, 2018.

  1. soulgeezer

    soulgeezer Poster Extraordinaire

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    I am currently reading a book called Codename: Villanelle by an English author named Luke Jennings. In the book, he uses what is a strange syntactic construction to an American reader. He says a number of times in the book that some event will take place "Friday week" or "Wednesday week" or some such. But the construction is always the same: Day + the word "week" to indicate some particular time frame.

    To our British friends: What does this mean? Is it the same as when we say "Friday of next week" or "Wednesday of this week" in the US? I assume it means one or the other. I can't imagine what else it might mean.

    Can anybody help? This is one that I haven't seen before. Any illumination would be greatly appreciated!
     
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  2. Mid Life Crisis

    Mid Life Crisis Poster Extraordinaire

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    It means " a week this coming Friday/Wednesday/whatever" i.e. not this Friday or Wednesday coming but the one after.
     
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  3. TheGoodTexan

    TheGoodTexan Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Day + the word "week" is not uncommon in this region at all.

    I say "Friday week" or "Wednesday week" all the time, to indicate the day in reference is in the follow week, so as not to confuse it with the same day of the current week.
     
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  4. soulgeezer

    soulgeezer Poster Extraordinaire

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    So, if today is Monday and I say "Wednesday week," that means a week from Wednesday, or nine days from today?

    I think that's it. Am I correct?
     
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  5. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    I don't do any of this stuff, because it causes too much confusion.

    If I say "Last May", which May am I talking about? 2018 or 2017? If there's no sense of Reliability about what you're trying to say, you are screwing up. You can't leave things so uncertain like that.

    Suppose it is 15 minutes past midnight and I tell you "I need you right here, tomorrow, at 11:30 AM sharp - let's synchronize our watches." Now, you don't know if I'm talking about the new day (which started at one minute past midnight) or the one after that.
     
  6. TheGoodTexan

    TheGoodTexan Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Correct.
     
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  7. scottser

    scottser Friend of Leo's

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    it also works referring to last week, as in 'i was in the pub last friday week', indicating not the last friday gone, but the friday before that.
     
  8. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Never heard it stated that way in my life. There is the perpetual uncertainty of someone saying on Monday, "next Tuesday" when "a week from Tuesday" is the intention...but on Monday saying "next Sunday" meaning the very next Sunday that comes.

    Adding "week" seems to make sense to avoid confusion but just sounds odd in amongst the Midwest vernacular.
     
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  9. soulgeezer

    soulgeezer Poster Extraordinaire

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    Thank you!
     
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  10. TheGoodTexan

    TheGoodTexan Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Cheers!
     
  11. Bill

    Bill Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I’m an American living in London. I feel for you.

    The one that gets me is the “half plus number” construction, as in, “Please be here promptly at half four.”

    So what is that? 2pm?

    In Germany, half four means halfway to four; i.e., 3:30.

    In England it means halfway past four; i.e. 4:30.

    Must have made planning for D-Day quite difficult.
     
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  12. soulgeezer

    soulgeezer Poster Extraordinaire

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    My wife is Japanese (as in, from Japan). She has the hardest time understanding that "this Friday" means the Friday that will occur in the current week and "next Friday" means the Friday that will occur in the following week. As to "next Sunday" meaning the upcoming Sunday in a given week, I believe that's because Sunday is the first day of the week, so it's always "next week."

    Yeah, it's confusing. It's a miracle we achieve successful communication in English at all!
     
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  13. RB522

    RB522 Tele-Meister

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    To this confusion, let me add the dilemma off being a night-shifter. For 21 years I worked a 12 hr night shift, 7pm to 7am. My life was 180 degrees out of sync with everyone else's. The question of " Is this yesterday or tomorrow ? " was valid and often asked. Don't even bother asking what day it is, let alone what week we're referring to !
     
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  14. brookdalebill

    brookdalebill Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    I've heard it all my life, and I always understood it.
    Lucky me!
     
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  15. tfsails

    tfsails Friend of Leo's

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    Several years ago, I read Winston Churchill's eight-volume tome, "The Second World War". Took me three years to read it, and the first volume was by far the hardest to get through. The reason? The books were written in English--I'm American. It was during the reading of this book that I came to realize there are more differences between English English and American English than I thought there were. Once I learned how to read English instead of American I was all right. There are more differences between the languages than I realized. My English sister-in-law and her sister once proceeded to totally bollix me up while talking to one another in the latest slangy English vernacular. Never thought I'd be lost listening to two English-speakers talking!
     
  16. hemingway

    hemingway Poster Extraordinaire

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    I make absolutely no claims for the English language making much sense - especially when you factor in the local accents and dialects that we in these islands even have trouble understanding among ourselves.

    But remember, it is the English language: the original incarnation of English. The versions of English spoken in the US, Canada, Australia, India, and many others countries, are therefore imitations of it.

    So if any version of English is going to be the "right" one, it's going to be the one spoken in England.

    EXCEPT that, as I said, there are a hundred versions of English spoken in England, and a hundred more in Scotland, Wales, and Ireland. And I suppose they're all the "right" version.

    Confusing? Yes. Wonderful? Oh, yes.
     
  17. rdwhitti

    rdwhitti Tele-Holic

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    My parents were from the Carolinas and my mother always used those expressions, both ways.
     
  18. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Wanna make God smile ?

    Make plans a week from Wednesday or Wednesday week.

    She doesn’t care how you say it .

    She’ll
    let you know ! :lol::lol::lol::lol:
     
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  19. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I still get in trouble with 12:00 AM and 12:00 PM...a product of Satan. She giggles loudly as well...
     
  20. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Satan’s a dude. Many have been fooled by his shapely hircine hindquarters but don’t ye be fooled !
     
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