Sell my Fender Vintera MIM & buy a Squier Classic Vibe?

Sell the Vintera and buy a Classic Vibe?

  • Sell the Vintera to buy the Classic Vibe

    Votes: 5 12.2%
  • Keep the Vintera and forget about the Classic Vibe

    Votes: 36 87.8%

  • Total voters
    41

TwangerWannabe

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Keeping the Vintera is the right decision. I generally don't like Pau Ferro fretboards, but yours doesn't look that bad. However, if the looks of it really bother you (it does look a little weird with the LPB body), there's an easy fix. Get some Fiebings Leather Dye (either dark brown or black) and dye it. I've used the black dye on a Laurel fretboard and it turned out great. Looks like ebony and hasn't worn off after a year. Never tried it with Pau Ferro.

If what you really want is a maple fretboard neck, you could look for a maple Vintera neck and sell the Pau Ferro one. I put a Vintera 50s neck (7.25" radius vs the 9.5" on the Vintera 60s Modified neck) on an American Special and love it. There are several Vintera 60s roasted maple fretboard necks on Reverb right now. They're going for around $350.
And if he doesn't like how it turns out it will really reduce the value of the Vintera if he decides to sell it and there goes that $350 that he was hoping to pocket if he went down that road selling the Vintera.
 

TwangerWannabe

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I have four other guitars right now. I need the cash, but I have a couple options, so it's not too urgent. It'll work out...but thanks for the advice. :)

I just watched this, and while I'm still planning on keeping the Vintera, the takeaway from his video (and the comments within) tells a VASTLY different story than this thread. It's almost like they are from two different realities lol.

For those giving me crap about thinking about making this swap, watch that video, look at those comments (as well as pretty much any other comments on the entire internet about the subject) and tell me it's not at least worth pondering.
You do realize that many of these YouTubers have other interests here, many are compensated or paid to make these videos, and just liek this forum, these videos and content are done to sell more guitars. Buyer beware!
 

EllenGtrGrl

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Just my 2 cents worth, adding to what have been a lot of replies to the original post, with a slightly different view point (yes, I know the OP said he was going to hang on to his Vintera 60s) - I can understand needing the money. I've had a few times where I had money crunches that forced me to sell gear. In some cases, I really had no choice, due to there being no other avenues for getting the needed funds. In one period (2000 - 2002), I ended up selling all of my pro level gear, from when I was more active in the live scene, to make ends meet (especially after I took a huge cut in pay, during the 2000 - 2003 recession, that resulted in corporate downsizing), and left me with only an acoustic guitar. The feelings afterwords were mixed. Some of the gear I really missed, the other gear - not so much, since I really wasn't using or playing it, and it was just collecting dust. In short, selling gear to make ends meet is a mixed bag regrets-wise.

The OP also stated that he just wasn't bonding with his Vintera 60s Tele, so he didn't mind getting rid of it for a little extra cash, since he'd replace it with another Tele (a CV 50s). I've been there too. I live in an apartment, and have limited storage space for music gear (at the present time I have 2 acoustics, 3 electrics, and 3 amps [one of which is an acoustic guitar amp, and one of which is a tabletop Yamaha THR5] - I'm maxed out space-wise), so if any of my gear ends up collecting dust after having owned it for several months, because I'm just not playing it, it typically goes bye-bye. In my personal experience, if I don't gel with a guitar or amp after several months, it's not happening. The CV series Squiers are nice guitars, but to reiterate what was said in an earlier post - you'd better not mind it's neck. The CVs have very thin necks, so much so, that in my personal experience (the guitar in my Avatar photo was an MIC CV Thinline), they (figuratively speaking) make even a Bullet Tele's neck, seem like a baseball bat. The CV Tele Thinline only lasted 2 or 3 months with me as a result of that little fact of life. It sounds like you'd like to not only get cash from selling your CV 60s, but don't like its fingerboard. If you don't like the CV60's fingerboard (maybe you don't like pau ferro, or prefer a maple fingerboard), and it doesn't look like oiling it will rectify things, you may want to consider used? It will open up a lot more with regards to choices. You can get used MIM Standard Teles for $450-$500 (a new CV 50s costs $450), it'll have better electronics, without the super thin neck, and you'll have leftover money to boot. Just a thought.
 

Si G X

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Location
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You do realize that many of these YouTubers have other interests here, many are compensated or paid to make these videos, and just liek this forum, these videos and content are done to sell more guitars. Buyer beware!

I agree with everything you've been saying.

I also watched that video and I largely agreed with what he said, we all know there isn't a massive difference between the lowest-end Fender and a top of the range Squier. They are both perfectly fine playing and sounding guitars. I don't think there's a massive difference in quality between a Vintera and a Performer either.

But that's not the situation we are talking about. I think the CV just complicates the question, it's really about "I need money, so should I sell my Vintera" The OP has other guitars, he doesn't need to buy a CV and if it were me I wouldn't even be thinking about buying another guitar.

It's tricky because we aren't in his situation. When the kids were small I didn't even own a guitar for about 7 years. I had way more important things to spend my money on.
 

bettyseldest

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If you have a small amp, like a Princeton or Deluxe Reverb, you could sell, buy a Twin, pocket the $350+ you make on the deal, and be happy ever after.

But before doing anything, take a good look at your finances and make sure that you are not going to be in this situation again in a fw months.

There's a lot to be said for selling the Ventura, paying off the debt, and looking after the change. That way when the next rainy day comes you are in a stronger position, and can avoid selling in haste. They say that you should hold between three and six month's expenditure just in case, Not easy to do, especially when you are skint and living from one month's salary to the next, But it gives you an idea of how much you may need to avoid repeated financial crises. I had a couple of years where I was pushing my overdraft limit every month, it is stressful. I hope that is not where you are.
 

tele_paul

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And for the record, when I said the $350 would help with paying bills, I didn't mean that I'm behind on payments or in dire straits in any way. What I meant was, it'd help with the increasing price of things like gasoline. Prices on everything are going up, you know this. My cars registrations are coming up, and so is the Arizona Summer heat along with increasing utility rates. To jump to the conclusion that I must about to be on the streets is a bit silly, although I do thank those that are legitimately trying to help.
 
Last edited:

tfarny

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That's wise advice, although I love my other guitars, pedals, etc. too much to make this a habit. I haven't exactly bonded with the Vintera is why I targeted it. The fretboard drives me up the wall too, both because of how it looks and feels. But what you say is true, so I'll have to do some thinking.

Also, one way of looking at it is, if I sell one Tele for the other, I'll still have a Tele. If I have to sell other stuff, then that stuff is gone forever.



That's part of it. Like I said above, I don't like the fretboard on the Vintera, and I don't even like the body color all that much. That particular Fender was an incredible deal at the time, brand new $695 shipped, so I jumped on it.

Besides, I need to pay some bills and need to pull money from somewhere.....preferablly where it will impact my collection the least.
Yeah I was thinking, if you are considering it, you probably aren’t real attached to the fender. In which case, go for it. Plenty of other people are decal sniffers, no need to add to the ranks.


Edit: never mind
 

kaynray

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Joined
Mar 30, 2012
Posts
59
Wow. Kinda hate to jump into the middle of this fray. But WTF, here I go. It seems like the OP has made a decision that is gonna work for him. Good. Good for him. But it also seems that sometimes on these forums we can get so specialized (not this OP and his particular question, but maybe the rest of us listening in) that we can forget a couple things.

1. A guitar is just another tool. It has one job, and one job only: to help you make music. Of course, it has to be a tool you're comfortable using, but it doesn't have to be an expensive tool, or a fashionable tool, or a tool that makes you look swell in your Nudie suit (tho how cool would that be?). Some of the finest music EVER made was done with cheapie catalog guitars.

2. Nothing in this life is forever. You buy a guitar (Vintera?) play it for a while, fall out of love, so you sell it. The world doesn't stop turning, or even shudder. Then you buy another (more expensive, less expensive, doesn't matter as long as it fits you), you adapt to it and you make music. Then you fall out of love and here we go again. It's the circle of guitar life. I suppose there are people out there who buy a guitar, absolutely love it and never buy or need another. I just don't know any of those folks.

To the OP: I am sincerely glad you made a decision that works for you. Just play that thing, make music, and share that music with others. And if at some point (for whatever reason that's important to you) a particular tool no longer fits the bill, then move on to another. As long as you can still make music you enjoy, nothing lost.

Of course I have favorite guitars, but no guitar needs to be the last guitar you will ever buy.

Well, except, truth be told, I'm over 70 now and someday soon I will buy my last guitar. Circle of life.
 

tele_paul

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Joined
Feb 18, 2013
Posts
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Location
Phoenix, Arizona
Wow. Kinda hate to jump into the middle of this fray. But WTF, here I go. It seems like the OP has made a decision that is gonna work for him. Good. Good for him. But it also seems that sometimes on these forums we can get so specialized (not this OP and his particular question, but maybe the rest of us listening in) that we can forget a couple things.

1. A guitar is just another tool. It has one job, and one job only: to help you make music. Of course, it has to be a tool you're comfortable using, but it doesn't have to be an expensive tool, or a fashionable tool, or a tool that makes you look swell in your Nudie suit (tho how cool would that be?). Some of the finest music EVER made was done with cheapie catalog guitars.

2. Nothing in this life is forever. You buy a guitar (Vintera?) play it for a while, fall out of love, so you sell it. The world doesn't stop turning, or even shudder. Then you buy another (more expensive, less expensive, doesn't matter as long as it fits you), you adapt to it and you make music. Then you fall out of love and here we go again. It's the circle of guitar life. I suppose there are people out there who buy a guitar, absolutely love it and never buy or need another. I just don't know any of those folks.

To the OP: I am sincerely glad you made a decision that works for you. Just play that thing, make music, and share that music with others. And if at some point (for whatever reason that's important to you) a particular tool no longer fits the bill, then move on to another. As long as you can still make music you enjoy, nothing lost.

Of course I have favorite guitars, but no guitar needs to be the last guitar you will ever buy.

Well, except, truth be told, I'm over 70 now and someday soon I will buy my last guitar. Circle of life.

Well said! 👍
 




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