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Scroll Saw Blade for Cutting Bone

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by WrayGun, Oct 5, 2020.

  1. WrayGun

    WrayGun Tele-Afflicted

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    You’ve probably figured out everything about this post already, but I’ll go ahead and spell it out.

    I picked up a used scroll saw, for various purposes, but mainly for cutting bone blanks down to size for nuts. Gave it a quick try this afternoon and needless to say, didn’t work out very well. The blade picks up the material, so I was thinking about installing the blade upside down. Good idea or bad idea?

    And, should I use a spiral blade, or some other specialty blade? Bone is pretty hard stuff.

    Thanks!
     
  2. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I would think a fine toothed blade would work better. Maybe hot glue the bone down to a board that allow you to hold onto it more easily. Some scroll saws have a hold down device too.
     
  3. Peegoo

    Peegoo Poster Extraordinaire

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    I like to use a 20 TPI skip-tooth blade and low speed for cutting bone nuts and saddles.

    You want the blade cutting on the downstroke. Olson blades are very good.

    The hold-down thing on scrollsaw is good for large thin lightweight materials...not small parts like nuts and saddles. It just gets in the way. If the hole in the saw's table is much larger than 1/4" diameter, make a throat plate with a tiny hole for when you're doing small stuff like nuts, saddles, pearl inlay, etc. It's a huge help.

    Do not force the material into the blade...let the blade do the work and advance the material slowly. A scroll saw works like a little band saw, but it's not fast at all. It is slow and super accurate.

    Make sure your saw is tuned up; check for blade wobble; it should be running perfectly vertical. If there's any slant to the blade in any direction (front to back or side to side) it will make the material jump around. A well-tuned saw runs smoothly like a sewing machine and is way more precise.

    For final rough shaping on nuts and saddles I use 120-grit belt on a small belt sander.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2020
    highwaycat likes this.
  4. yepyep

    yepyep TDPRI Member

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    I used to do that, and it was always a wild ride. A couple things I found. A fine blade makes for a less scary experience. Hold the blank with a pair of parallel jaw pliers like channellocks. This gives you firm control and keeps the blank on table where it needs to be.

    I just sand them now.
     
  5. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    I use my band saw for rough cutting and a dry belt sander for rough shaping. Files and sandpaper for the fine stuff.
     
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