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Scratch Tele Build

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by MM73, Feb 26, 2015.

  1. barbrainy

    barbrainy RIP

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    It's, ummmm............ it's, ahhhhh, ermm...................it's ........


    .........no, there are no words for it.
     
  2. Meteorman

    Meteorman Tele-Holic

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    Hmmmm.... Are you sure there are such things as "low spots"?
    I was thinkin they are the new baseline and everything else becomes a high spot that has to come down to them.

    Anywho, let us know how it works out. I'm wrassling with the neck/frets on my 2-hole thinline build right now. Worst part of a build for me, by far.

    The Swayze pillow... yeah.... ummm...
    unspeakably unique.....
     
  3. MM73

    MM73 Tele-Afflicted

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    I always wanted to show everyone something they hadn't seen before.
    Didn't think it was going to by a pillow.

    Just to be clear, it is, um, my wife's pillow.

    Well, the low one is the baseline, until one of the tall frets getting filed so low that I have to stop.

    ...then you are stuck with the "low spot"!

    I'll take more care leveling the fingerboard when I'm sanding the radius next time.
     
  4. MM73

    MM73 Tele-Afflicted

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    Fine Sanding the Body

    Time to put a fork in 2015.

    I had hoped to finish this one this year, but will have to settle on January 2016.

    When I grain filled, I didn't plug up some of the holes, so figured I would wet sand while they were sealed up.

    Here is the starting point.

    Fine Polish Start 30Dec2015.jpg

    I thought this was a nice level starting point.
    ...I've learned a lot in the past two days.

    Only one set of holes were not sealed with grain filler...the ferrule holes.
    No wax that I could find around the house, so grabbed some of the kid's play doh.

    Doh!

    That stuff soaks up water. Ended up filling my string holes with water because the front side was sealed with grain filler. The water soaked into the wood and lifted the surface a bit on the front and back side. :mad:

    The bridge will hide the damage on the front...it doesn't look to be so bad that bridge install will be an issue.
    The damage on the back will be visible, but just one of many mistakes to be seen on the guitar finish...it will hide in plain sight.

    Wet sanded with my micromesh starter kit and a bowl of water with a drop of dish soap in it.

    Micromesh 31Dec2015.jpg

    I started with the 1800 mesh and worked my way thru 12000.

    It was at this point, I realized my grain fill and leveling was inadequate.:(

    I have spots that are like glass, and spots that appear pitted.
    Small pits, but pitted.

    Went thru the progression 2 more times, but couldn't get them to disappear.
    Figured I'd stop before I take the lacquer clean off.

    What to do?
    I could start spraying more lacquer.

    Figured its time for this one to be done.
    The finish is much nicer than last year's kit strat. I took a big leap by trying to do this one with grain fill. Gotta do a first grain fill some time tho.

    I've learned, and the next one will be better.

    Moved on to polishing.

    Used 3M Finesse-It II followed by Mequire's ScratchX 2.0 to remove the swirl marks.

    Polish 31Dec2015.jpg

    Because I never have been able to post more than 4 pics, I'll post the front and back view pics in the next post.
     
  5. MM73

    MM73 Tele-Afflicted

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    Auld Lang Syne

    Front and back view after fine sanding and polishing :lol:

    Polished Back 30Dec2015.jpg Polished Front 31Dec2015.jpg

    My finish work leaves a lot to be desired, but I'm pretty happy with it. :lol:

    I did my best, and its leaps and bounds better than my first finish attempt.

    The guitar looks great from across the room, so I'll call it a win.

    Anyone I know that will hold the guitar or play it will see the flaws...but if they make fun of the mistakes, I can punch them 'cause they've never tried to build anything like this.

    Happy New Year All!

    Here's to building and chasing perfect in 2016!
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2015
  6. MM73

    MM73 Tele-Afflicted

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    Ever do something bad that was completely preventable?

    This is what happens when you wet sand the wrong way. :mad:

    Cracks at String Thru Holes 07Dec2016.jpg Cracks at Neck Pocket 07Dec2016.jpg

    Don't flood the water on the surface as if you are prepping a rice paddy. :mad:

    I figured I had a pretty good seal all around, with the grain filler, sealcoat, and lacquer piled high.

    Nope.
    This damage came from water penetrating near the pickup routes.

    Fortunately, only one area below the string thru holes will be visible. The rest will be hidden by the pick guard and bridge.

    Unfortunately, my experience with cracks is that they don't stop once they start. Really bad on airplanes, rocket ships, and bridges...just ugly on guitars.

    So, to keep the ugly from spreading, I decided to paint on some lacquer. The seal coat must also be cracked. My hope is that the lacquer will fill any crevice through the sealcoat, and re-melt the surface whole again.

    I had spray lacquer, but had ordered some in the can in case I felt like trying my hand at tinting and shooting with the Preval.

    Lacquer 07Dec2016.jpg

    So, I just wiped down the area to be fixed, and wiped on some unthinned lacquer with a disposable foam brush.

    Repair 07Dec2016.jpg

    I read one fix-it article where the crack was opened up a bit with an exacto blade. I felt like I might make things worse trying that method, so opted to just brush on the lacquer first.

    I expect after the solvents evaporate, this will sink back a bit, so a couple coats may be necessary.

    No big deal for the area under the pick guard. But I'm hoping to clean this up where it will be visible below the bridge.

    This is going to set me back a bit as I'm going to have to wait for this to cure up before I can really set into leveling it out and polishing.

    Will jump ahead while this cures and see if I can start some wiring work.

    Bummer.
    Live and learn...go sparingly with the water.

    FYI - I kinda opted for water as I read micromesh may lose its bond to its foam backing when using solvents like mineral spirits for wet sanding. True...not sure?
    Also, I can wet sand in the house with family when using water.
     
  7. paulmarr

    paulmarr Tele-Holic

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    Can I ask why you need to use water? Have you tried denatured alcohol (methylated spirits)? It evaporates pretty quickly and will not soak into the wood like water ...
     
  8. MM73

    MM73 Tele-Afflicted

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    I had read a thread where the micro mesh lifted from its backing in a solvent (I think mineral spirits). Not sure that alcohol would be strong enough to cause that problem?
    I have fallen in love with my micro mesh, and did not want to harm it.

    Winter set in also, so I was trying to work in the house without fumes.

    I pay the mortgage, and felt like I should spend some time inside of it for once! The inside of the house is so clean and bright...it almost seemed like a formal event.

    ...I'll give the alcohol a try when I get back at it.
     
  9. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I tried naphtha once and it lifted the micromesh from its backing. :neutral: Dunno about alcohol...
     
  10. barbrainy

    barbrainy RIP

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    There's no doubt that water is a risk, the risk of which can be eliminated by using [whatever else]. My experience with using mineral spirits and naphtha with micromesh was unsatisfying to me, and clogged up the MM much more (irreversibly, quickly). So I still use water. I use the hottest water I can bear to touch, which then evaporates quickly on the surface. I can't objectively claim this is better, but it seems to work for me. But then I have very little bare wood in the first place, I am not a believer in all the 'having a bare wood neck pocket improves tone' kind of stuff... I bung up any risky holes with wax, though.

    On the guitar body, I mean.....
     
  11. MM73

    MM73 Tele-Afflicted

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    If I recall correctly, which rarely happens, I think it was your post that I originally read.


    Have I mentioned that I really, really like the micro-mesh?

    I'm not willing to be the guinea pig and try micro-mesh and alcohol.
    Maybe when its time to get more sheets when my current supply wears out.

    Thanks for the tips and warnings.

    I'll fix 'er up best as I can, and will try the hot water sparingly.

    With respect to the bare wood, I masked it all off for fear of the unknown. I think next time, I'll just leave it all unmasked and spray away.

    It was all masked off at the time of wet sanding, with the masking tape coated pretty heavily in shellac and lacquer. I think I disturbed the edge of the tape while wet sanding, and created my leak paths.

    It looks pretty shoddy now. But, I can see after 1 coat of lacquer, it is starting to heal up.

    This little hiccup will delay the build a bit...I fear that I will now have to plan a first birthday party.
     
  12. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Ad Free Member

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    One thing to consider if you really like MicroMesh, is that I think you can buy it without the foam backing--just the cloth. Then you could use alcohol or whatever.
     
  13. barbrainy

    barbrainy RIP

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    That's what I have. I have not had first hand experience with the foam backed stuff.
     
  14. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

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    Dude, so sorry for your issues. It will get back to fantastic in short order just be patient.
     
  15. MM73

    MM73 Tele-Afflicted

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    Micro Mesh Stuff

    If what I read is correct, the mesh without foam backing is Micro Mesh MX series? The literature I found states that it is compatible with water, oils, and solvents, as you mentioned.
    One slight downside, though, is that it does not have an equivalent to the 12,000 regular series pad. I know, nitpicking now.

    View attachment Micromesh Comparison 15Jan2016.pdf

    If either of you are using something different than MX, please let me know...I'd definitely be interested!

    The literature also confirms that the foam/cloth backed Regular Series Micro Mesh IS NOT compatible with alcohol (as suspected).

    View attachment Micro Mesh Compatibility 15Jan2016.pdf

    Hello Doc
    My water fiasco really took the wind out of my sails. After letting it sit for a bit to thoroughly dry out, I found more cracks on the back side at the ferrules.
    I was hoping the damaged areas would sit back down after drying and not crack - no luck.
    Since I'm unsure if I will wet sand again with water, I opted to just re-hang the guitar and re-spray the front and back to lacquer over the control cavities.

    The cracks are healed, but the scars remain. I'll post pics later.
    I think to really fix it, I'd have to sand back to bare wood and re-level that surface.
    Not going to go there!
    I'm still lucky, the scars will be visible on the back, but the front will only have one scar visible - just peeking out past the edge of the bridge.

    Now I sit and wait for the 2 re-coats of lacquer to cure.
    At least I'm getting some time to practice playing again! :lol:
     
  16. barbrainy

    barbrainy RIP

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  17. MM73

    MM73 Tele-Afflicted

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    Aha - just had a moment of clarity.

    What you linked to is what I have. Its cloth backed, but has some thickness...so I called it foam backing.

    ...my literature shows its not compatible with anything but water and dish soap.

    Out of curiosity, I looked up the MX series. At $52 USD for the cheapest kit I could find, I think I'll stick with the regular.
    Its made for sanding metal. Despite having some finer "grits", probably nothing I want to drag across lacquer.

    I may shoot a couple more coats of lacquer over the exposed wood, then tread carefully and sparingly with hot water.

    Thanks for the info!
     
  18. barbrainy

    barbrainy RIP

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    Ah, then maybe I'm also confused. When you lot were talking about foam backed, I thought you meant this type of thing:

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/ulk/itm/141877236477

    I've always considered my stuff to just be cloth backed.
     
  19. MM73

    MM73 Tele-Afflicted

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    ack.jpg

    ...not another Micro Mesh!!!

    ...all I wanna do is get this thing bolted together and see what I've got!

    I promise, whatever I get after the next wet sanding is what I'm going to live with. I've reached the end of my rope with finish work!!!
     
  20. barbrainy

    barbrainy RIP

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    Heh heh. If you come over to the Side of Satin, you'll find finishing so much less stressful.


    Also, whilst one shouldn't confuse the Side of Satin with the Side of Satan, you may wish to consider selling your soul to him in return for ungodly finishing skillz.
     
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