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scarf joint keeps slipping when glued!

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by ugly_guitar_guy, Feb 20, 2012.

  1. ugly_guitar_guy

    ugly_guitar_guy Tele-Meister

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    Hey guys, I'm doing some practicing on scrap pine to learn how to make a scarf joint neck, but all my attempts end up with the joint slipping about 1-2mm after it's been glued and clamped and left to dry. I'm at a bit of a loss as to how to keep it from moving while it's still wet (other than sit there and hold it for an hour while the titebond dries :rolleyes: ). Anyone have some tips that can help me out here? Thanks!
     
  2. jkingma

    jkingma Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Last edited: Feb 20, 2012
  3. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I use 2 clamps.. one to hold down the neck shaft down to the table and the other to hold down the scarfed peghead part down to the table. I also will occasionally clamp a block in front of the peghead to stop it from moving.
     
  4. Maricopa

    Maricopa Friend of Leo's

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    Clamp it dry then drill a couple holes where the tuners holes will be and use a toothpicks as dowels.

    Edit: Sorry, this won't work when you put the scarf on the neck shaft (ie, the wrong place ;) ). In that case I like the method John showed above.
     
  5. jkingma

    jkingma Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Mike - why do you consider that the "wrong" place to put the joint?

    In my mind, it makes a stronger joint doing it the way I do, because the fretboard goes over both pieces, which should add some strength to the whole assembly.

    It's probably less visible your way... but that's about the only advantage I can see in it.

    Explain yourself... :D
     
  6. Maricopa

    Maricopa Friend of Leo's

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    In general I think it's not quite as strong since it's not backed up on both sides like a headstock scarf with an overlay and backstrap, but it's still plenty strong. I recently repaired a re-issue Dano with a scarfed neck shaft. It broke, but not on the joint.

    I'll admit I don't like the way they show, but mostly I was just poking fun. :D
     
  7. '59_Standard

    '59_Standard Tele-Holic

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    Scarf
     
  8. jkingma

    jkingma Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Well as long as you're having fun at my expense, that's the main thing. :D
     
  9. Maricopa

    Maricopa Friend of Leo's

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    I'm glad you understand. ;)
     
  10. oigun

    oigun Tele-Afflicted

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    Put a piece of double sided tape over the joint before you apply the glue. Make sure you don't have the stretchy stuff.
     
  11. Picton

    Picton Friend of Leo's

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    Like this. I use the bench as a big, flat caul for laying everything out sideways, then I clamp one of the pieces (usually the neck) VERY securely to the benchtop. The other piece (usually the headstock) gets a great many supporting pieces, also clamped to the benchtop, to hold it in place before I clamp the actual joint. Lay down some wax paper underneath the whole assembly.

    Like most glue-ups, it's hard to see the workpieces underneath all the clamps once I'm done. On the whole, I think I like jkingma's idea better, even if it is a little screwy. ;)
     
  12. emoney

    emoney Tele-Afflicted

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    Helps a little if you let the glue tack up a little before you clamp. And then, clamp the
    neck-end first, but with light pressure until the 2nd clamp is in place on the end of the
    headstock.
     
  13. ievans

    ievans Tele-Meister

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    You can significantly reduce the potential slippage by a) not adding too much glue to the surfaces and b) rubbing the faces together for a few seconds before clamping them into position.

    For a), you want enough glue to ensure the joint isn't starved, but if you're getting a ton of squeeze out you've added too much. Ideally, you want small beads of squeeze out when pressure is applied.

    For b), you just take the glue faces and move them slightly back and forth before moving the pieces to their final positions. You'll feel the joint begin to bond, and it'll be harder to move the pieces. It's helpful to use a pencil line to mark the final position.

    I use the trick mentioned above where you use a clamp lengthwise to keep the end of the headstock from creeping, but it should be a lot easier if you've done the two steps above.
    [​IMG]
     
  14. Davecam48

    Davecam48 Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    I just use two very small brads 1.2mm diam just tapped into the centre line on one side, nipped off about 1mm above the surface and sharpeded to a point. Press the other half down using a flat timber on one side as a guide and indent two holes in that surface.
    Glue up and move around until both holes locate on the pins and clamp. Of course don't place the pins close to either thin edge where they may be sanded into. Works a treat! In all you end up with about 2x 3mm of steel in the neck but I won't tell!
     
  15. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

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    Similar to what others have posted. I've never had one slip using this method.

    [​IMG]

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    [​IMG]
     
  16. ugly_guitar_guy

    ugly_guitar_guy Tele-Meister

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    brilliant. Thanks guys! I'm gonna tackle another go at it shortly using what ive learned here.
     
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