Saw Bob Dylan and his band last night...

StrangerNY

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at the Beacon Theater, the second of 3 nights of a shortened NYC run.

259847131_10227322113098387_2879034685497712133_n.jpg



The set was heavy with songs from the Rough & Rowdy Ways album, but he included standards like 'Watch The River Flow,' 'I'll Be Your Baby Tonight, 'When I Paint My Masterpiece' and 'Serve Somebody.' Bob was in pretty fine voice - I was told that he was emphasizing enunciation and singing in a higher register so he could better get the lyrics to the new stuff across, and it worked. He put the new lyrics across really well, sounding as close to the 'old' Dylan' as I've heard in recent years. Some of the imagery in the new stuff is startlingly direct, and Bob seemed to really enjoy putting them across with a big helping of the old sarcasm. Riveting stuff.


The Rough & Rowdy Ways stuff was pretty demanding, but the Beacon crowd is always pretty hard core and they seemed to know a lot of the material pretty well. The band had a pretty loose feel going on - I'd compare it to Tom Waits' Heart Attack & Vine album - at times it all sounded like it was about to fall apart, only for the band to suddenly lock in and sound tight as a drum. The song 'Mother of Muses' was given a slow blues feel, and it was filthy. The songs sounded like the album cover looks, like a drunken brawl was about to break out. But you never had the feeling that the band was anything but extremely well rehearsed.


Guitarists Bob Britt and Doug Lancio made up for the absence of Charlie Sexton - Britt was especially good - and drummer Charlie Drayton came back to the band once Matt Chamberlain decided he didn't want to go out on this tour. Donnie Herron and Tony Garnier were their old reliable selves, with Herron playing his usual handful of instruments and Garnier spending most of the night on his doghouse bass, going back and forth between aggressive plucking and softly bowed parts on the quieter numbers.


The band has one remaining night at the Beacon and two nights this week at the Capitol Theater in Port Chester, with stops in Boston, Providence, Philly and DC rounding out the end of the tour. The tour was only half as long as they expected it to be, but everybody seemed pretty happy to be back out on the road. Bob briefly chatted up the crowd at the end of the show and left the stage without an encore, but I don't think anyone felt short changed. Quality show as usual.

- D
 
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StrangerNY

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Very cool!
Charlie Sexton is a great guitarist, I’m glad ol Bob has found good replacements!

Both of them were excellent! They've both got pretty hefty resumes, they've played with everyone from Lucinda Williams to Tom Jones.

Charlie ended up playing guitar on Elvis Costello's tour. He committed to a few dates while the fate of Bob's tour was being decided (and while Steve Nieve was held up from entering the country), and then ended up just riding out the whole tour with EC.

- D
 

brookdalebill

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Both of them were excellent! They've both got pretty hefty resumes, they've played with everyone from Lucinda Williams to Tom Jones.

Charlie ended up playing guitar on Elvis Costello's tour. He committed to a few dates while the fate of Bob's tour was being decided (and while Steve Nieve was held up from entering the country), and then ended up just riding out the whole tour with EC.

- D

Cool!
Though I admire and respect Bob, I’m way more of an Elvis Costello kinda guy.
Glad Charlie is staying busy!
 

StrangerNY

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Cool!
Though I admire and respect Bob, I’m way more of an Elvis Costello kinda guy.
Glad Charlie is staying busy!

I don't know if this video will work, but James Trussart posted a video of Charlie with Elvis in Hollywood (I believe it was the last date of the tour), playing one of his Steelcasters.



You don't usually get to hear Charlie stretch out on a solo when he plays with Bob. He's a killer player.

- D
 

Jim622

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at the Beacon Theater, the second of 3 nights of a shortened NYC run.

259847131_10227322113098387_2879034685497712133_n.jpg



The set was heavy with songs from the Rough & Rowdy Ways album, but he included standards like 'Watch The River Flow,' 'I'll Be Your Baby Tonight, 'When I Paint My Masterpiece' and 'Serve Somebody.' Bob was in pretty fine voice - I was told that he was emphasizing enunciation and singing in a higher register so he could better get the lyrics to the new stuff across, and it worked. He put the new lyrics across really well, sounding as close to the 'old' Dylan' as I've heard in recent years. Some of the imagery in the new stuff is startlingly direct, and Bob seemed to really enjoy putting them across with a big helping of the old sarcasm. Riveting stuff.


The Rough & Rowdy Ways stuff was pretty demanding, but the Beacon crowd is always pretty hard core and they seemed to know a lot of the material pretty well. The band had a pretty loose feel going on - I'd compare it to Tom Waits' Heart Attack & Vine album - at times it all sounded like it was about to fall apart, only for the band to suddenly lock in and sound tight as a drum. The song 'Mother of Muses' was given a slow blues feel, and it was filthy. The songs sounded like the album cover looks, like a drunken brawl was about to break out. But you never had the feeling that the band was anything but extremely well rehearsed.


Guitarists Bob Britt and Doug Lancio made up for the absence of Charlie Sexton - Britt was especially good - and drummer Charlie Drayton came back to the band once Matt Chamberlain decided he didn't want to go out on this tour. Donnie Herron and Tony Garnier were their old reliable selves, with Herron playing his usual handful of instruments and Garnier spending most of the night on his doghouse bass, going back and forth between aggressive plucking and softly bowed parts on the quieter numbers.


The band has one remaining night at the Beacon and two nights this week at the Capitol Theater in Port Chester, with stops in Boston, Providence, Philly and DC rounding out the end of the tour. The tour was only half as long as they expected it to be, but everybody seemed pretty happy to be back out on the road. Bob briefly chatted up the crowd at the end of the show and left the stage without an encore, but I don't think anyone felt short changed. Quality show as usual.

- D

Good thorough review.
 

brookdalebill

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I don't know if this video will work, but James Trussart posted a video of Charlie with Elvis in Hollywood (I believe it was the last date of the tour), playing one of his Steelcasters.



You don't usually get to hear Charlie stretch out on a solo when he plays with Bob. He's a killer player.

- D


Thanks!
Great sounding band!
I’m a huge ARC Angels fan, and conversely, a Charlie and Doyle fan.
I sold Charlie a guitar when I worked at South Austin Music.
Charlie got game, and is a nice guy.
 

StrangerNY

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Thanks!
Great sounding band!
I’m a huge ARC Angels fan, and conversely, a Charlie and Doyle fan.
I sold Charlie a guitar when I worked at South Austin Music.
Charlie got game, and is a nice guy.

The last time I got to hang with Charlie we spent time talking about Van Morrison and no-stick frying pans. :lol: Conversations with him have a way of taking pretty strange turns.

Missed seeing him last night, but he should be back with BD when the Spring tour rolls around.

- D
 

thechad

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I saw Dylan about 12-13 years ago. I’m a big fan of his work but hands down it was one of the worst concerts I’ve ever been to. Maybe it was an off night, bad sound guy, or maybe just a stop on the tour to fill in a gap that they didn’t care too much about. I don’t know.
What I do know is that Bob didn’t say a single word to the audience. The band had reworked all the songs into something else, which would be fine and interesting to me except the fact that Dylan’s vocals were inaudible. Without the lyrical queues to the reworked songs, it was next to impossible to even make out what songs they were playing.
I left wondering if we had even been to a Bob Dylan concert or if it was some sort of scammer.
Luckily we got word after the show that a favourite indie band of ours was playing at the local pizzeria-bar-dive and we went to salvage the night.

Glad your concert experience was much better than that!
 

StrangerNY

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I saw Dylan about 12-13 years ago. I’m a big fan of his work but hands down it was one of the worst concerts I’ve ever been to. Maybe it was an off night, bad sound guy, or maybe just a stop on the tour to fill in a gap that they didn’t care too much about. I don’t know.
What I do know is that Bob didn’t say a single word to the audience. The band had reworked all the songs into something else, which would be fine and interesting to me except the fact that Dylan’s vocals were inaudible. Without the lyrical queues to the reworked songs, it was next to impossible to even make out what songs they were playing.
I left wondering if we had even been to a Bob Dylan concert or if it was some sort of scammer.
Luckily we got word after the show that a favourite indie band of ours was playing at the local pizzeria-bar-dive and we went to salvage the night.

Believe it or not, that was by design.

The one thing that Bob Dylan would never, ever commit to was being a nostalgia act. He didn't want to enter middle age being the guy with the acoustic guitar and harmonica, doing 'The Times They Are A-Changin' for the 10,00th time. So he made the conscious decision to start re-working his old stuff, often to the point of having another new arrangement for every tour. He and his management knew this would drive a lot of fans away, but they made the gamble that it would attract a new crowd that hadn't listened to Dylan before. And it worked.

Dylan's shows are definitely a challenge, to himself, the band and the audience. This tour in particular is even more challenging, since they decided to deep-dive into the new record. The songs are a lot like his old stuff - lots (lots) of lyrics, darker and more complex arrangements, just different from the last few tours which were mostly older stuff. Until the 2019 tour, I'd seen him a few times and never saw him pick up a guitar.

But that band, man...those guys are fantastic. Bob knows exactly what he wants out of them and he gets it. As interesting as Dylan is, his band is the reason he gets away with being so radical with his older material.

- D
 

tap4154

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I saw Dylan about 12-13 years ago. I’m a big fan of his work but hands down it was one of the worst concerts I’ve ever been to. Maybe it was an off night, bad sound guy, or maybe just a stop on the tour to fill in a gap that they didn’t care too much about. I don’t know.
What I do know is that Bob didn’t say a single word to the audience. The band had reworked all the songs into something else, which would be fine and interesting to me except the fact that Dylan’s vocals were inaudible. Without the lyrical queues to the reworked songs, it was next to impossible to even make out what songs they were playing.
I left wondering if we had even been to a Bob Dylan concert or if it was some sort of scammer.
Luckily we got word after the show that a favourite indie band of ours was playing at the local pizzeria-bar-dive and we went to salvage the night.

Glad your concert experience was much better than that!

That's about the time I saw him as well. It was so bad I walked out after about four songs, and walked around the adjoining county fair instead, enjoying some of the local bands playing at different stages. He wouldn't allow the big screens to be turned on, and his vocals were so inaudible I couldn't tell what the song was until the lead guitar would occasionally play some of the melody. It was like he was just yelling gibberish while the musicians played a bunch of racket.

I'm still a fan, especially of his old work, but no interest in seeing him in concert again.
 

Dave Hicks

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We saw Dylan about 2003. He was unintelligible and singing in no particular pitch. Joan Osborne gets the bravery award for singing harmony with him on a couple of tunes.

But we've seen him 3 or 4 times since, and he was coming across much better (even spoke to the audience once or twice).

His band was great every time, though. (Included Larry Campbell for that first show.)

D.H.
 

Stubee

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at the Beacon Theater, the second of 3 nights of a shortened NYC run.

259847131_10227322113098387_2879034685497712133_n.jpg



The set was heavy with songs from the Rough & Rowdy Ways album, but he included standards like 'Watch The River Flow,' 'I'll Be Your Baby Tonight, 'When I Paint My Masterpiece' and 'Serve Somebody.' Bob was in pretty fine voice - I was told that he was emphasizing enunciation and singing in a higher register so he could better get the lyrics to the new stuff across, and it worked. He put the new lyrics across really well, sounding as close to the 'old' Dylan' as I've heard in recent years. Some of the imagery in the new stuff is startlingly direct, and Bob seemed to really enjoy putting them across with a big helping of the old sarcasm. Riveting stuff.


The Rough & Rowdy Ways stuff was pretty demanding, but the Beacon crowd is always pretty hard core and they seemed to know a lot of the material pretty well. The band had a pretty loose feel going on - I'd compare it to Tom Waits' Heart Attack & Vine album - at times it all sounded like it was about to fall apart, only for the band to suddenly lock in and sound tight as a drum. The song 'Mother of Muses' was given a slow blues feel, and it was filthy. The songs sounded like the album cover looks, like a drunken brawl was about to break out. But you never had the feeling that the band was anything but extremely well rehearsed.


Guitarists Bob Britt and Doug Lancio made up for the absence of Charlie Sexton - Britt was especially good - and drummer Charlie Drayton came back to the band once Matt Chamberlain decided he didn't want to go out on this tour. Donnie Herron and Tony Garnier were their old reliable selves, with Herron playing his usual handful of instruments and Garnier spending most of the night on his doghouse bass, going back and forth between aggressive plucking and softly bowed parts on the quieter numbers.


The band has one remaining night at the Beacon and two nights this week at the Capitol Theater in Port Chester, with stops in Boston, Providence, Philly and DC rounding out the end of the tour. The tour was only half as long as they expected it to be, but everybody seemed pretty happy to be back out on the road. Bob briefly chatted up the crowd at the end of the show and left the stage without an encore, but I don't think anyone felt short changed. Quality show as usual.

- D

That sounds great! Thanks for the story.
 




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