Satin Wipe on Poly Finish Hardness

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by bfisch, Oct 29, 2019.

  1. bfisch

    bfisch TDPRI Member

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    I've been testing satin wipe on poly on a piece of mahogany. I filled the grain first and followed with 10 thin coats of satin wipe on poly, lightly sanding in between with 220 grit. The finish looks quite nice, but can be dented with a finger nail. Does anyone have any experience with wipe on poly, and if so, were you able to achieve a hard finish?
     
  2. newuser1

    newuser1 Tele-Meister

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    Yes, I've done 2 guitar bodies, a bench, and a coffee table with wipe-on poly and they all cured to a nice hard finish. Maybe give it 2-3 days before handling it?
     
  3. Warren Pederson

    Warren Pederson Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I did a strat body with it, turned out great
     
  4. Jim_in_PA

    Jim_in_PA Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    A wipe-on product is very dilute, so you need to do about three applications per what would be normally one coat applied by brushing. There should be no difference in "hardness" one cured...in theory...as long as you build it up to the same level.
     
  5. schmee

    schmee Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    Are you waiting long enough between coats? Is it a Paulonia soft wood body?
    I've been brushing on wipe on finish, even then it still comes out fine.
     
  6. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

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    Sounds like either you are not giving it the proper 72 hours or so to cure or you have a bad batch. All of the wipe ons and spray poly's I've worked with have dried super hard within the time mentioned on the bottle or can.
     
  7. POS Guitars

    POS Guitars Tele-Meister

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    I have excellent results with wipe-on poly with hardener made by Mohawk. The poly is fully hardened in a day. I also use their nitro lacquer, which needs to be sprayed. Both great products.

    Mohawk poly: M603-3016
    Mohawk nitro: M610-1406
     
  8. bfisch

    bfisch TDPRI Member

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    Everyone, thank you for the advice. I'm going to add some additional coats and essentially double what has already been applied, then wait 72 hours before handling it. If it still dents easily after that, maybe I'll abandon the idea of using satin and switch to gloss wipe on poly and wet sand the gloss finish to get a satin sheen. Could satin wipe on poly be a softer (as in physical hardness) less protective finish than gloss wipe on poly?
     
  9. TequilaCaster

    TequilaCaster Tele-Holic

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    It seems to me that the hardness of the poly finish greatly depends on the hardness of the wood on which it is applied. That's been my experience.
     
  10. Jim_in_PA

    Jim_in_PA Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    The primary property that was the impetus for polyurethane finish is abrasion resistance...understandable since it was aimed at the flooring industry pretty heavily. "Hard" and "Abrasion Resistant" are not necessarily complimentary things. Poly tends to have more "give" and as a result, is slightly less prone to scratching, for example, than a finish that develops a "harder" surface which can also be more brittle. Many times, the difference is subtle, but it's also product dependent.

    But to your point, the underlying wood might or might not provide "more support" for the finish layer when that wood is "harder", but it's not going to change the nature of the finish, itself. A harder wood species will not dent as easily, for example, which means that the finish on top of it may stay more pristine after a blow as long as it has a little flexibility...like poly tends to have.
     
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