Sanding question

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by Fender-guy, Jul 27, 2021.

  1. Boreas

    Boreas Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I didn't fill mine, but didn't want a glossy neck. Satin hides allotta imperfections. Gloss exaggerates them.
     
  2. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    I'm never sure what people mean when they talk about "grain filling". Grain is the swirly lines that come from growth rings and the way they were cut across. The beautiful flame on your neck happened because the cells of the wood alternate back and forth as they were sawn. Its beautiful and a characteristic of maple that we prize.

    Some woods like mahogany, rosewood, koa have little open pores the run in the long grain direction. When evaporative finishes like lacquer is sprayed on the wood it fills the pores while it is wet but shrinks as it dries - the little pores open up and the surface is not smooth. Most finishers will fill the pores with something that does not shrink before putting the finish on.

    In my experience maple does not have open pores and does not need pore filling. I still might put a coat on to give me a smooth surface for my lacquer. The only way to know on your neck would have been to see it before you started.

    Lots of commercial maple necks are now being finished with catalyzed poly-something instead of lacquer. New Fender necks are a good example. The poly wears a lot longer but is really hard for us hobby finishers to deal with - in fact I won't. There is a simple test - put a drop of lacquer thinner on some part of the guitar that doesn't show (the foot print of a tuner) and if it softens its lacquer, if it doesn't its poly. The finish that I see in your second group of photos looks like amateur application of one of the wipe on poly floor finishes that you can buy in a hardware store. I didn't want to say anything if it was you that put it on other than the fact that it wouldn't be acceptable to me.

    Other than continuing to work with it I don't have any other advice. Good luck, its a pretty piece of wood.
     
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  3. Fender-guy

    Fender-guy Tele-Holic

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    Yes I received the neck and immediately was disappointed. It took almost 6 months to get this neck in my hands so I wasn’t going to send it back. So I stripped it and figured I’d just do it myself. Here’s a few pics of it completely stripped. MusiKraft did their aged oil finish and then it was off to MJT.

    This is it stripped with paint stripped. It came all off really quick so it had to be a nitro of some sort 7456D519-2F6D-4C28-842E-653950165FD3.jpeg 7EF71F05-2250-4CEC-A065-CE6A2571D84D.jpeg C78FC05F-231C-4002-9B3A-90049D7A1AAC.jpeg 9558B42E-94A8-4416-99F1-8B27D0E7DE2A.jpeg
     
  4. telepraise

    telepraise Tele-Afflicted

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    Maple has very tiny pores and thus is never pore filled like mahogany or ash. What is common is to lay down several coats of sanding sealer first, and then level that before applying color or top coat. Sanding sealer has a higher solids content and shears off wonderfully. It's a dream to sand. On maple, that step is going to do most, if not all, of the pore filling.

    If gloss smooth is your goal, then you will be sanding off a good deal of that finish before applying more and 8 coats may not get you there without redoing the sealing step. End result will be a relatively thin film of nitro which should be OK everywhere but the fretboard, where finger wear will grind through the finish to bare wood sooner or later. Perhaps that's the effect your going for with nitro on the FB.

    That's some REALLY nice figure in that maple BTW!
     
  5. Fender-guy

    Fender-guy Tele-Holic

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    Yes sanding sealer probably would have been a good idea to start with. However I’m not real concerned about the fretboard wear as the guitar is a relic anyway. I just wanted the dust/dirt and haziness gone.
     
  6. Fender-guy

    Fender-guy Tele-Holic

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    A little up guys. I still regret not using the sealer first but after the last coat of nitro went on I waited a few weeks before sanding.

    I started with 600 wet up to 2000 wet and used a buffing compound I had. I think it turned out great and I got what I wanted in the end. I high gloss finish all over the neck not just the back. All the dirt and dust from the previous finish is now gone from the fretboard and is shines!

    Last coat of nitro cured and before any sanding. 0AC798BB-C0BA-4896-A208-29276E5CEB1E.jpeg 10360EB7-C86C-4C49-BB08-BEFAB34BF00C.jpeg Now after sanding and polish 4D310A00-0E0C-478E-B52B-A4F2717D0240.jpeg DAC4E068-D6CD-404C-A5D3-8FCC2B2FF1BF.jpeg A3CE6E44-3359-474A-977D-BE27A58C713D.jpeg 21CF3731-0071-4CC1-AC9F-DE0356A2CAA8.jpeg 3B0B7B87-7200-453F-BAB1-9EE5C9C4030F.jpeg 0B7C3ADE-8764-4174-A194-C5128DA6EEE1.jpeg
     
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  7. Sea Devil

    Sea Devil Friend of Leo's

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    Looks great! Nice job.
     
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