Sanding out a crack

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Yonatan, Jul 11, 2019.

  1. Yonatan

    Yonatan Tele-Meister

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    I'm sanding the body to get out the nicks I made while installing the parts, and I noticed this crack. Not sure how it got there. I've started to try to sand it out, but could that make it worse somehow? Would it be better just to fill it with Z-Poxy or something? I do want to do a semi-trans finish (dark reddish). I can just barely catch on it with a fingernail, otherwise it's smooth to the touch. But I don't really know how deep it goes.

    rsz_img_20190711_225204.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2019
  2. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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  3. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire

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    Fill with 5 second glue, then sand. It wicks right into the crack.
     
  4. Yonatan

    Yonatan Tele-Meister

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    Thanks all.

    I'm not familiar with that, from Google it looks like a product that cures with UV light? Or is this just CA?

    And if I'm going to fill the pores on the entire body with Z-Poxy, should I just leave it alone until then?
     
  5. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire

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    Just CA. I get mine at the hobby shop, it comes in super thin to thick. I'm not sure epoxy will wick into that tight a crack. CA wicks right through.
     
  6. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    Be aware if you get CA on the surrounding cells, it's like putting on a sealer and that area won't absorb anything else. This could lead to a mismatch /blotch from your finish coats if you are staining. Even before finish if you add it, the wood around it will darken somewhat. Especially in that location which is all end grain.
     
  7. Jim_in_PA

    Jim_in_PA Tele-Meister

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    Wait to fill with the CA or resin until after you put at least your first coat of sealer/finish...for the reason that guitarbuilder mentions in post #6
     
  8. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    wet it with thin CA.. followed by medium viscosity CA..the thin will suck the thicker CA into the crack... then sand once again... the wood may receive dye less willingly, but that can be negated by simply making the edges a darker shade of whatever color you were gonna use.

    rk
     
  9. Yonatan

    Yonatan Tele-Meister

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    Watching YouTube videos about using CA on wood.

    Thanks everyone for pointing me in the direction.
     
  10. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Afflicted

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    I use water thin CA (StewMac #10) on lots of repairs where I want it to wick into small cracks. I use it on bindings where I can't always get it cleaned off of the surrounding wood. The little bit that is left doesn't seem to affect either stains applied to unsealed wood or Zpoxy, and it seems to be clear under lacquer. AR glue stands out like a sore thumb and I certainly wouldn't use epoxy for this repair.
     
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