Sanding lacquer to remove shine?

Discussion in 'Amp Tech Center' started by mrgroo, Jan 14, 2020.

  1. mrgroo

    mrgroo TDPRI Member

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    Just wanting to get opinions and experiences people have of sanding their tweed amps...

    bear with me!

    I have a 50s fender narrow panel but it has been re-tweeded by a previous owner. They lacquered the tweed pretty heavily it seems because the amp has a quite prominent lacquer shine to it.

    I was thinking of taking 600/400 grit sandpaper to it to try and remove some of the shine but leave a thinner layer of lacquer.

    What do you think? Anyone done anything similar? Anyone got very shiny tweed amps? Or is this best avoided?

    From my perspective it’s already non original tweed so no harm in trying and seeing if it works right?
     
  2. Lies&Distortion

    Lies&Distortion Tele-Afflicted

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    All of the low spots will remain shiny and it will be hard to do evenly.

    0000 steel wool? Fine Scotch Brite pad?

    Buy a can of semi-gloss or something, or live with it? Seems like sanding will create a mess.
     
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  3. pickaguitar

    pickaguitar TDPRI Member Silver Supporter

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  4. charlie chitlin

    charlie chitlin Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    Keep steel wool away from electronics and magnets!!!
     
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  5. mrgroo

    mrgroo TDPRI Member

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  6. mrgroo

    mrgroo TDPRI Member

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    That’s a sobering thought about the low spots... hmmmm. Maybe it’s eventually gonna get a proper re-cover then.
     
  7. Lies&Distortion

    Lies&Distortion Tele-Afflicted

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    I've never touched a Tweed amp, so I could be wrong. But I have worked with laquer and sheen issues.
     
  8. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Buy a can of satin or etc lacquer. Strip everything and give it a coat.
     
  9. Axis29

    Axis29 Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    I don't think you'll need to strip it. Might be able to shoot the new lacquer on top. As long as you know it was lacquer they used before, and buy a product that is compatible.

    If you were okay with going a touch darker, use some amber shellac, in a light cut. It's my favorite 'aged lacquer' look. You could go with a lighter shellac as well. I've done two amps with amber shellac and a number of guitars. It really is the correct color.
     
  10. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Hah!:lol: I meant take all the chassis , speaker etc out! I like 50/50 amber and non tint shellac. But Nitro is better for the final coat. Shellac scrapes real easy leaving a white surface mark.
     
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  11. Axis29

    Axis29 Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    Then, yes, agree 100%! LOL



    Now, that's funny.
     
  12. gkterry

    gkterry Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    I wouldn't attempt it with anything but a green scotch pad rubbed with no pressure on the pad at all.

    I would probably not worry about it at all. Over time it will dull up a bit on its own I would expect.
     
  13. trxx

    trxx Tele-Holic

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    Maybe try some acetone diluted with water. It would be best to test a few dilution strengths on some scrap before trying it on your cab. If you opt for sandpaper, I would definitely start with a higher grit first. Maybe try 1000, 2000, or higher on some scrap or the bottom of the cab and see where that gets you before trying rougher stuff. I suppose how you approach it depends on how thick the lacquer is and how much it fills in the voids between the fibers.
     
  14. 5E3 For Me

    5E3 For Me TDPRI Member

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    If it's poly hit it with a coat of satin. I just did a Champ in gloss by mistake and don't like it at all. I'll be doing the last coat in satin and it's all good. If you try sanding, do just the bottom until you are sure it's the way to go.
     
  15. Chunkocaster

    Chunkocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    Hit it with flat clear or just scuff it up with something equivalent to 400 grit but that will get into the low spots too.
     
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