Sanding dust and health problem

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by omlove, Oct 20, 2019.

  1. omlove

    omlove Tele-Meister

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    I can never been a luthier - I hate sanding. It's probably 60% of the time spent for any wood worker and it's the nature of the job. But it's the dust that frightens me.

    I saw in too many videos people just blow off the dust with mouth. Be it wood, plastic, bone, metal, there's gotta be some dust in the air. And we breathe them in. Even with vacumn tubes everywhere, I am still afraid of dust and the possible heath problem caused from inhaling.

    How do you deal with it? I am humbled to learn.
     
  2. RottenTheCat

    RottenTheCat Tele-Holic

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    Bro in law was a fine furniture maker till he lost a lung to dust.
     
  3. Matthias

    Matthias Friend of Leo's

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    Without a proper shop, I sand outside where I can and wear a mask. They can all cause different ailments. Bone and some resin dust can be bad even in small quantities.

    Some dust is explosive too...
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2019
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  4. rolandson

    rolandson Tele-Meister

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    It's all about safe working practice. Hazards exist in every craft. Managing them is one of the fundamentals...or, as a friend once put it:

    "Safety is no accident."

    Even rudimentary vacuum systems are quite effective at minimizing, if not eliminating, dust. What isn't caught there is what the mask is for.
     
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  5. hopdybob

    hopdybob Tele-Afflicted

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    there are many ways to protect yourself from harm, and that begins with knowing what you are using.
    not only lungs can be harmed by dust, also your noose can to.
    i have used iroko wood, i gave me a permanent rhinitis (the mucous lining of the nose becomes inflamed).
    some wood can do that, but not only wood, also some finish products have solvent that can harm you.
    and no, a dust mask will not protect you, but a mask with vapour filter can.
    but that does not have to block you for building, sanding and furnishing a guitar.
    just read the ..... manuals, ore ask some pro's how they tackle these things ;-)
     
  6. saltyseadog

    saltyseadog Tele-Meister

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    Working in the correct environment with the correct equipment as masks etc is as safe as it gets and most definitely the way to go but realistically speaking anyone who lives in a large town or city is probably breathing in more dangerous materials just walking down the road. Is there any proof that woodworkers have a higher percentage of ill health than anyone else. Sometimes you just have to use common sense.
     
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  7. tele_savales

    tele_savales Tele-Meister

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    It's a major issue. Between doing that and applying finishes if you don't wear a respirator you're crazy, but some guys don't seem to mind.
     
  8. rangercaster

    rangercaster Poster Extraordinaire

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  9. ppg677

    ppg677 Tele-Meister

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    I recently built an air quality sensor. Measures pm2.5 and pm10. Cost me $50 in parts including a Raspberry Pi.

    Interestingly I found that smoke creates the hugest spikes in pm2.5

    Also different tools spread more fine dust than others.
     
  10. 1293

    1293 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Mask and dust collection. I was a solid dosage pharma engineer and spent a lot of time scaling up processes. PPE powered respirators were par for the course. All of my manufacturing suites were negative pressure monitored by magnehelics through the BAS.
     
  11. BobbyZ

    BobbyZ Doctor of Teleocity

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    Get a resperator. 3M came out with disposable ones when I was in the painting biz, they totally sucked! I was using Binks then.
    One day I get a phone call for a survey about 3M's new line of resperators. (normally I hang up on serveys) The young lady asked a bunch of questions and I just said MAKE THEM COMFORTABLE. Well I didn't yell at her but explained that comfort was the most important aspect of something you wear on your face.
    I'm sure I wasn't the only one that said that. They improved the line up and I use them to this day.
    https://www.google.com/search?q=3m+...Wa0KHWGHDLsQsxgIMA&biw=1100&bih=1856&dpr=2.63
     
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  12. BobbyZ

    BobbyZ Doctor of Teleocity

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    Couple more things. Skip the paper things! There's no valve to release when you exhale so your face gets hot and they're really only good for stuffing pillows. Because they'll keep feathers out of your mouth but little else.
    Some paints, like anything with a hardener you need an air supplied mask for. You need an air supplied mask for sandblasting as well.
    For guitar work a good charcoal filter respirator should be fine.
     
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  13. beninma

    beninma Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I don’t do a ton of sanding but the disposable 3M paper ones rated for sanding work for me even though they definitely make you sweat and can fog glasses/goggles.

    if I’m doing powered sanding my orbital sander collects dust very well so I’m not worried. Hand sanding doesn’t produce as much dust so quickly. I still try to always wear the mask though.

    Applying finishes frightens me more.

    I sanded close to 3000sq feet of mahogany deck this summer I was very grateful for the dust collection system on the sander. Mahogany dust is supposed to be pretty bad and that dust was impregnated with stain too.
     
  14. mefgames

    mefgames Tele-Afflicted

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    downdraft sanding table......


    IMG_7250.jpg
     
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  15. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    DBBC9242-38D3-46B2-9855-DF894EFDA664.jpeg
     
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  16. Skydog1010

    Skydog1010 Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

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    I have used a 3M respirator for the last 30 years for most of my project works, I would say more than 80% of the time. I have shot some nasty stuff too, zinc chormate being the worst of the lot. My first 20 years of projects I never wore any protection. I have never worn a clean air system. I am writing this as a warning to you folks, the dangers are real, all of my close friends that applied finishes, sanded substrates for a living are now dead. My o2 levels at hyperventilated mode are 97 saturation at the very best (while on a CPAP with 2 liters of o2) and my blood gas co2 levels are now in the elevated range and rising, every six months they get worse with no way to reverse.

    Protect your lungs, you're very likely to only get one set. I doubt seriously at 66 years old I would qualify for a transplant should the need arise in the near future.

    One last warning, don't smoke - anything. I did for 42 years, if I had a chance to repeat my life, smoking would be the very top of my list of things I would do differently. Having COPD is a tough way to spend your later years.

    Be smart with how you take care of your body.
     
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  17. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    .

    Modify your shopvac like this.



    My vac has molded wheels into the vac tub so I built a sandwich insert using plywood and a 5gal bucket to do this same feat. Changed running my equipment a lot. Before, the vac filter just pluged.

    .
     
  18. telepraise

    telepraise Tele-Holic

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    The correct equipment is important. 1st off, a RO sander with a dust port. The Bosch ones made in Switzerland are amazing (ROS 65VC)- almost no vibration and quiet. The other critical component is a vacuum made specifically for the task. For a long time, Fein was a great option but their long-term reliability is sketchy now. Bosch and Festool make great ones. Be advised, these vacuums are nothing like your typical shopvac. First, they are so quiet you can't tell they're on. Second they're very powerful, almost no dust escapes the sander. They're also triggered to turn on and off when you turn on the sander. Sadly, it costs you close to a grand to get set up for serious sanding, but if you're going to be doing it a lot, it's worth it.
     
  19. Matthias

    Matthias Friend of Leo's

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    Some wood dust is carcinogenic, several dusts can cause asthma, bone can set up and start growing, some solvents attack the nervous system... And it’s not just the material but the shape of the particles and whether your lungs can flush them. That’s why a single asbestos fibre has the potential to cause asbestosis as it gets lodged. I never used to pay attention but these days I always wear a respirator. They’re fairly cheap so why risk it?
     
  20. bftfender

    bftfender Friend of Leo's

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    right out of High School into flooring trade,..we were sanding Asbestos tile floors for a few years before the health warnings. Very fine dust, no good collection system..was 18 & had no clue
     
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