Sam and Dave : Hold On I'm Coming

stratisfied

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We used to play this song in my high school garage band in the late '60's. Our version was a lot like the Mauds' cover just like you'd expect from a bunch of suburban white kids. Our lead player did use a Gibson Maestro- Fuzz-tone on the "saxophone setting" to cop some of the Sam & Dave feel, though.

Listening to this now, it doesn't hold a candle to the original.

 
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fretWalkr

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I love that tune. Such a great feel to that track. All the music coming out of Stax during those years had that groove. Sam Moore's phrasing is just amazing. on this Steve Cropper was playing a 60s tele thru a tweed harvard during that period.
 

Mr. St. Paul

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Legend has it that the lyric “Hold on, I’m coming” came about because one of the guys was on the toilet and they were telling him to hurry.

It was David Porter. He and Isaac Hayes came up with the riff and were sketching the song out when Porter had to take a bathroom break. Right when he left, Hayes got a musical idea and needed Porter there to come up with a lyric. Impatient, he shouted out for him and Porter yelled, "Hold on, I'm coming!" And Isaac knew they had the title!
 

Alaska Mike

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Had a 9-12 piece band back in high school (when the size of the band was less of an issue) that did all soul covers. I leaned heavily on this era of Stax and Atlantic. Lots of charts derived from piano books (when I could find them) and off the records. 90% of our setlist was pumped up versions of the more uptempo songs and James Brown.

In this era of YouTube and the internet in general, I see we only scratched the surface of what was out there. It's not like we didn't scour every record store we could find for old soul albums, but there just weren't that many available to us. Most of the soul sections in your average suburban store were the Blues Brothers and Big Chill soundtracks. Literally. The record stores in the more urban sections of town mostly had stuff from '75 on, partly because they rarely lasted more than a decade and didn't have the old inventory. It was sad that in a town that was named in "Night Train" you couldn't find a copy of "Night Train". When CDs hit and all of the boutique labels started reprinting old stuff, then there was more to choose from.

Next time I'm in the Lower 48, I'd love to make a pilgrimage to Stax. I know it's not the original studio, but it's still better than Graceland to me. Not sure I can convince the kids a 12 hour drive is worth it, though.
 

Dave Hicks

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...

Next time I'm in the Lower 48, I'd love to make a pilgrimage to Stax. I know it's not the original studio, but it's still better than Graceland to me. Not sure I can convince the kids a 12 hour drive is worth it, though.

Stax is now a pretty interesting museum. Memphis also has the Rock & Soul and Civil Rights museums, as well as Beale St., the Peabody hotel, etc. Right across the border from Mississippi blues land, too.

D.H.
 

Alaska Mike

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Yeah, but the original theater/studio and record store were demolished in the ’80s by the church that bought them. What’s there is a recreation, with some incredible programs, but it isn’t the original Stax. Time moves on, I guess. If they’re continuing the legacy of Stax, that’s the important thing.
I could probably drag the kids as far as Nashville, which is cool for completely different reasons, but after that would be mutiny.
 




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