Saddles at max height, but action too low

Steve Holt

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I took the neck off to remove all of the shims, and took some measurements.

The neck pocket depth is 0.63 inches (16mm), measured from the bottom of the pocket to the surface of the body.

The neck thickness at the heel, measured to the crown of the fretboard is 0.99 inches (25.2mm).

From the neck heel to the side of the fretboard is 0.98 inches (25mm).

Yeah by my estimation that neck and body are perfectly within fender spec. So as long as you're not using an oddball bridge you should have no issues. That and it looked to me like the nut was still cut fairly high (though I'm only judging from a few photos).

So this guitar should not need any shimming, sanding or the like. Contact Warmoth.
 

Freeman Keller

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That’s an amazing write up, thanks for sharing. I have been sketching things up during my lunch break to try to understand the geometry, but that has cleared it up!

I can assure you that if you follow the geometry thread while you are building any guitar and the setup thread while you are doing the setup that your guitar will very playable. Some of the things that have been suggested in the above thread may or may not work, I can promise that taking careful measurements and understanding the relationship will work.

Good luck.
 

marc2211

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I had the same with a Warmoth Strat neck and body. I had a Tusk nut fitted as part of the Warmoth spec and was using a hipshot HT bridge (which I think is part of the issue).

Rather than make an dramatic changes, I used a shim at the front of the neck pocket (the smallest from Stewmac) and added some relief - it now works and sets up and works fine, albeit with nowhere else really do go on saddle height.

I'd like a little more adjustment option from the saddles, but as the nack is so stable, it's not needed changing for a number of years.
 

KiloJuliet

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Hello all, appreciate it has been a while since I’ve given an update. About 3 days ago I reinstalled the neck and installed a fresh set of strings. I loosened the truss rod to the point where I’m not feeling any resistance when turning anticlockwise (not sure if loosening it further will add relief?).

Unfortunately there is still a backbow in the neck. I have left the guitar leaning against the wall in the hopes it will help, but it doesn’t seem to have moved. It is a roasted maple neck so I suppose it is a more impervious to movement than regular maple.

Having raised the saddles to their maximum height, I am able to play on most of the frets with a bit of buzzing. But the high e is dead from frets 1-15 (frets 15-22 are ok).

I’m contemplating buying some more long action adjustment screws for the high e and low e (these screws are shorter than the ones on the other 4 saddles).

Any suggestions on what to do next?
 

Steve Holt

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Hello all, appreciate it has been a while since I’ve given an update. About 3 days ago I reinstalled the neck and installed a fresh set of strings. I loosened the truss rod to the point where I’m not feeling any resistance when turning anticlockwise (not sure if loosening it further will add relief?). It won't

Unfortunately there is still a backbow in the neck. I have left the guitar leaning against the wall in the hopes it will help, but it doesn’t seem to have moved. It is a roasted maple neck so I suppose it is a more impervious to movement than regular maple.

Having raised the saddles to their maximum height, I am able to play on most of the frets with a bit of buzzing. But the high e is dead from frets 1-15 (frets 15-22 are ok).

I’m contemplating buying some more long action adjustment screws for the high e and low e (these screws are shorter than the ones on the other 4 saddles).

Any suggestions on what to do next?

Contact Warmoth and send it back. It's what I've said from the beginning. This is their problem to fix, not yours.
 

Alex_C

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Unfortunately there is still a backbow in the neck.

Having raised the saddles to their maximum height, I am able to play on most of the frets with a bit of buzzing. But the high e is dead from frets 1-15 (frets 15-22 are ok).

Any suggestions on what to do next?

Sometimes neck wood warps or twists. You paid good money for this neck, contact Warmoth for a return to save yourself time and money.
 

telecastasaurus

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If your neck angle is the problem, DON'T SHIM IT. Sand your neck pocket to correct the neck angle. Use pencil lead to watch your progress. Shims give you air gaps and destroy the tone transfer between the neck and body. You'll end up with a thin sounding guitar no matter what you do with pickups and electronics.
 

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Boreas

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Hello all, appreciate it has been a while since I’ve given an update. About 3 days ago I reinstalled the neck and installed a fresh set of strings. I loosened the truss rod to the point where I’m not feeling any resistance when turning anticlockwise (not sure if loosening it further will add relief?).

Unfortunately there is still a backbow in the neck. I have left the guitar leaning against the wall in the hopes it will help, but it doesn’t seem to have moved. It is a roasted maple neck so I suppose it is a more impervious to movement than regular maple.

Having raised the saddles to their maximum height, I am able to play on most of the frets with a bit of buzzing. But the high e is dead from frets 1-15 (frets 15-22 are ok).

I’m contemplating buying some more long action adjustment screws for the high e and low e (these screws are shorter than the ones on the other 4 saddles).

Any suggestions on what to do next?

Don't throw good time and money at a bad neck. Unless you have a double-action truss rod, you are simply SOL. Return it.
 

Wound_Up

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If your neck angle is the problem, DON'T SHIM IT. Sand your neck pocket to correct the neck angle. Use pencil lead to watch your progress. Shims give you air gaps and destroy the tone transfer between the neck and body. You'll end up with a thin sounding guitar no matter what you do with pickups and electronics.

That's nonsense. Thousands of guitars have come from Fender with shims. I'd put money on the fact that you could NOT pick out a single one because it "sounded thin" due to the nonsense that you feel happens. How do yall come up with this stuff? You just feel like thats what happens so that must be it since other people feel like it happens the same way?
 

swarfrat

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Before you do anything, if this was a diy finish, check for drips and runs interfering with ne k seating
 

swarfrat

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Shims are fine but only full pocket shims. The small piece of metal can cause humps over time.
 

bobio

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I am a firm believer in using the least aggressive method to solve a problem.
I have an assortment of Stewmac shims in my parts bin, but you could even make your own.

 




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