Saddles at max height, but action too low

Boreas

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Nov 3, 2019
Posts
9,177
Age
67
Location
Adirondack Coast, NY
IMO, the neck heel looks too thick. The nut apprars to be set up for slide guitar! Measure the heel and the pocket. I think the neck sits too high just by eyeballin' it. I Am guessing nearly 1/4".

Likely need a different neck or a much taller bridge. You may be able to shim it to work, but why?
 
Last edited:

Boreas

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Nov 3, 2019
Posts
9,177
Age
67
Location
Adirondack Coast, NY
Oh, and yes only two strings are currently on the guitar. The action of tuning and loosening the strings multiple times has resulted in the strings snapping due to metal fatigue.

Don't bother with strings yet. Get thee a straightedge. Adjust the truss rod until the neck is dead straight. If it cannot be made straight, you definitely need a different neck.

Then attach the neck and lay the straightedge flat on the neck. It will show you where the top of your saddles need to be. If you don't want a saddle that high, you will need a neck that doesn't stand so proud of the pocket. OR, you can plane this one down, voiding any warranty. I see no need to shim or plane a new neck/body combo by the same manufacturer.

Send Warmoth pix and measurements and let them sort it out.
 
Last edited:

telemnemonics

Telefied
Ad Free Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2010
Posts
33,988
Age
62
Location
Maine
I have just put together a 'tele' from a neck and body from Warmoth. The neck is roasted maple, and has a 16 inch radius fretboard and 6100 jumbo frets, which isn't conventional (I grew up with Ibanez RGs- it's what I'm used to). Bolted the neck on and strung it up today.

I've found the action is far too low, even with bridge saddles at max height, especially the high e and low e. The open notes won't ring out because the strings are pressing against the frets.
I'm pretty sure its due to the radius and big frets. I haven't touched the truss rod yet, it has a -slight- back bow, so I will set the relief to achieve a slight concave, though I doubt this will solve all my problems.

I see several potential solutions, any suggestions on what I should do?

- Sand down the neck pocket floor to lower the neck in relation to the bridge
- Add shims to the bridge to raise it up in relation to the neck
- Shim the neck (a reverse shim to add forward angle?)
- Install taller nut? (I do trust Warmoth's nut installs though)

Thanks in advance
You identified your action problem when you identified the back bow.
Add relief and the action will come right up.
 

Cyberi4n

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Oct 28, 2020
Posts
1,006
Age
49
Location
Chester, Uk
Whilst others have pointed to the fact that the heel looks too thick, I’d suggest that the neck pocket is actually just right, when you look at the clearance between the pickguard and the fretboard overhang. You haven’t got MUCH room to play with if you took the heel deeper, as I think you’d have problems with the scratchplate
 

Boreas

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Nov 3, 2019
Posts
9,177
Age
67
Location
Adirondack Coast, NY
Whilst others have pointed to the fact that the heel looks too thick, I’d suggest that the neck pocket is actually just right, when you look at the clearance between the pickguard and the fretboard overhang. You haven’t got MUCH room to play with if you took the heel deeper, as I think you’d have problems with the scratchplate
Yeah, I think the pocket looks fine. That neck just stands mighty proud!
 

bobio

Friend of Leo's
Gold Supporter
Joined
Apr 7, 2010
Posts
2,141
Age
58
Location
Here
This may sound stupid, but I am a firm believer in trying the most obvious and stupid things first. Check to make sure the neck is fully seated in the pocket. If the through holes in the body are tight, the neck could be binding on them and not seating fully. I generally turn all the screws in hand-tight or snug, then tighten the screws at the back of the pocket fully and then the front. It is odd that a body and neck from Warmoth would be that far off. 🤷‍♂️
 

Buzzgrowl

Tele-Holic
Joined
Oct 3, 2017
Posts
591
Age
59
Location
Switzerland
Looking at those pics, your neck seems to have a backbow. Get a long straight edge (60cm or 24") Turn the truss rod counter clockwise by quarter turns, then measure for flatness with the straight edge. Do this repeatedly until the neck is flat. If you can't get it flat, it's broken and should be replaced / sent back.
 

Cyberi4n

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Oct 28, 2020
Posts
1,006
Age
49
Location
Chester, Uk
Can we see a pic of the bridge installation please? I still think the problem could be rectified with taller saddle screws
 

Steve Holt

Friend of Leo's
Joined
May 29, 2016
Posts
3,339
Location
Kansas
I'd also take a measurement of your neck and neck pocket. The neck should be 1" thick and the pocket should be 5/8" deep. That means your neck should stick out 3/8" from the top of the body (not counting the thickness of the pickguard) If those measurements all work out you shouldn't need a shim.
 

Boreas

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Nov 3, 2019
Posts
9,177
Age
67
Location
Adirondack Coast, NY
I'd also take a measurement of your neck and neck pocket. The neck should be 1" thick and the pocket should be 5/8" deep. That means your neck should stick out 3/8" from the top of the body (not counting the thickness of the pickguard) If those measurements all work out you shouldn't need a shim.

Couldn't have said it better!
 

KiloJuliet

TDPRI Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2022
Posts
15
Location
Grand Falls-Windsor
Can we see a pic of the bridge installation please? I still think the problem could be rectified with taller saddle screws
Here are some pics of the bridge on my phone. Let me know if you need a photo of something specific.
 

Attachments

  • 4317675D-55E3-4BA4-9B98-0423D2CC7C70.jpeg
    4317675D-55E3-4BA4-9B98-0423D2CC7C70.jpeg
    370.1 KB · Views: 44
  • 41E432C6-F5C6-4E3D-BCDB-AC3B04DF3B03.jpeg
    41E432C6-F5C6-4E3D-BCDB-AC3B04DF3B03.jpeg
    154.5 KB · Views: 44

KiloJuliet

TDPRI Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2022
Posts
15
Location
Grand Falls-Windsor
I'd also take a measurement of your neck and neck pocket. The neck should be 1" thick and the pocket should be 5/8" deep. That means your neck should stick out 3/8" from the top of the body (not counting the thickness of the pickguard) If those measurements all work out you shouldn't need a shim.
Fantastic idea. Is the neck thickness measured to the midpoint of the fretboard, the crown of the radius (ie at the thickest point)?
 

tweeet

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Oct 2, 2008
Posts
1,318
Location
england
Just by eyeballing your pics it looks to me like the neck is the same thickness as the neck pocket (not the route), the butt end that the neck rests in. I had a Warmoth neck and body a while back and the neck thickness was 20.6mm and the thickness of the 'butt end' was 20.9mm....therefore I also think your neck is too thick. I would send back if I was in the States...alternatively I'd take 3- 4mm off the neck heel.
 

telemnemonics

Telefied
Ad Free Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2010
Posts
33,988
Age
62
Location
Maine
Here are some pics of the bridge on my phone. Let me know if you need a photo of something specific.

Fantastic idea. Is the neck thickness measured to the midpoint of the fretboard, the crown of the radius (ie at the thickest point)?
Seriously, lots of random guessing in this thread after you said the neck has some back bow, and I didnt see many suggesting you take care of that first.
If you have not reversed the back bow into a bit of relief yet, drop all the other ideas.

Suggestions that Warmoth doesnt make necks the right thickness, something is wrong with your bridge, or you need a reverse shim, are all overlooking the fact that back bow is the cause of the problem you described in your first post.
 

Steve Holt

Friend of Leo's
Joined
May 29, 2016
Posts
3,339
Location
Kansas
Seriously, lots of random guessing in this thread after you said the neck has some back bow, and I didnt see many suggesting you take care of that first.
If you have not reversed the back bow into a bit of relief yet, drop all the other ideas.

Suggestions that Warmoth doesnt make necks the right thickness, something is wrong with your bridge, or you need a reverse shim, are all overlooking the fact that back bow is the cause of the problem you described in your first post.

Can't agree more. Seems like shims are thrown around too often. I have one guitar that required a shim, and that was a jaguar, which is pretty common.

If there's backbow on that dang neck it just ain't gonna work!
 

telemnemonics

Telefied
Ad Free Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2010
Posts
33,988
Age
62
Location
Maine
Oh, and yes only two strings are currently on the guitar. The action of tuning and loosening the strings multiple times has resulted in the strings snapping due to metal fatigue.
Heres my suggestion as an actual guitar tech.

Remove all shims.
Install all six strings and tune to pitch for full tension to set relief.
Adjust truss rod to get some relief, something like .005-.008 for starters.
You should then have very high action and need to lower the saddles.
 




Top