Rutters Cold Rolled Compensated Broadcaster Saddles

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by RifleSlinger, Nov 24, 2019.

  1. RifleSlinger

    RifleSlinger Tele-Meister

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    I put this guitar together a few years back with Rutter’s brass compensated saddles. I liked them, but brass is a little soft, and I’m picky about my more clarity.

    8177B9E0-14E5-40C6-9898-CCABB2402379.jpeg

    I had re-filed the grooves a couple times, but had long been curious if I would like steel better. I started guitar life as a Strat man.

    A359DA22-6C31-49CD-89A8-A09714E7FECD.jpeg

    I was worried about the steel imparting a brittle tone. My high e was already edgy. I actually found that, not only did my low strings come alive, the plain strings seem to be better balanced and sound more “supported”. It seems much more evened out, open, and clear.

    3492C406-6AB5-4B24-8A82-393A671A094B.jpeg

    The angle of the saddle height screws was different. Threw me for a loop for a second.

    Just fyi.
     
  2. gkterry

    gkterry Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    I have Rutter's saddles on a couple of my guitars. Marc does quality work.
     
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  3. bender66

    bender66 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Gotta be honest. I like the sound of the steel too.

    I've always wanted to try the steel E/A & brass remainder.
     
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  4. PeterUK

    PeterUK Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I’ve got a set ready for a future project. My expectations are high.

    I’ve also got a set of the aged brass ones that Marc has ‘grooved’ for me as I’m changing the bridge of my Broadie to one with the serial number stamped on it.

    Great products from a great guy.

    :) Peter

    PS. Is the serial number your birthday? ;)
     

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  5. oatsoda

    oatsoda Tele-Holic

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    Why just metal saddles, why no fossilized triceratops tusk saddles and nuts like on cork sniffer acoustics?
     
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  6. RifleSlinger

    RifleSlinger Tele-Meister

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    Yes, the day and month
     
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  7. RifleSlinger

    RifleSlinger Tele-Meister

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    Cause this here be a Tele.
     
  8. PeterUK

    PeterUK Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Ha ha! Got ya!

    Me too: I’ve got 0331 on the new one (I’ve also got the 0331 Blackguard Book) and the aged bridge I’ve had stamped 1961, the year I was born.

    :) Peter
     
  9. rangercaster

    rangercaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    Since a change like this would necessitate new strings and a re- intonation, it would be difficult to evaluate any change in tone over a short period of usage ... I always like the steel threaded Fender saddles over brass ...
     
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  10. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Yeah I was trying to figure out why they looked that way, thinking the action was set higher with the steel saddles until you pointed out that the screws are angled different.

    What I think you did there is mount the saddles backwards.
    They are in the right locations but if you turn each saddle around the height screws will be closer to right angle to the bridge plate/ guitar top plane, where the angle on them now puts extra pressure on the intonation screws and is not what Rutters intended when he gave them some angle to allow them to be more upright.
    Good idea from Rutters, I like my Tele setup with saddles pretty high for solid break angle and tension, but that puts the height screws tipping over more.
     
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  11. DavidP

    DavidP Friend of Leo's

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    FWIW, I put a set of these on my B-bender a few years ago, and was also initially concerned about the angle of the saddle height screws -- set a pic to MR and he assured me that I'd not reversed them and they were built this way as per the 'correct' 50s angle. You may want to contact him to confirm in your case.

    Here's pic of mine for comparison to your setup..
    fullsizeoutput_10ef.jpeg
     
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  12. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Brass is brighter right?
     
  13. Texicaster

    Texicaster Tele-Afflicted

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    Steel is brighter

    I prefer the Callaham steel style....

    WHY would you angle the screws to have less contact with the bridge! Callaham follows the classic Fender style of vertical screws that make positive contact. Plus they are stamped so if you remove and toss in a box you can easily determine which goes where.

    I have a set of Rutters I'll trade for Callham if you think the Rutters is better...
     
  14. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Thanks, I dug up some research I did a while back from over on the Gretsch pages. Just thought I'd pass it along for people:

    "Titanium is my favorite bridge metal. All my Serpentunes (12 at last count) are either Titanium or Brass.
    Out of all the metal choices Titanium is the most tonally balanced.

    The other metals tend to accentuate a particular frequency band:
    -Brass for low-mids (warmth)
    -Aluminium for high mids (twangy) Aluminium tends to accentuate 2-4 kHz
    -Stainless Steel for higher frequencies (bright). SS is more like 6-8kHz. I have heard SS described as "piano-bright".
    -Titanium does not accentuate any particular frequency range but is even across the whole frequency spectrum. It brings the whole spectrum to life. "
     
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  15. Ricky D.

    Ricky D. Doctor of Teleocity

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    I have the Glendale Outlaw set on my partscaster. That's a CRS e/a and brass remainder, slant compensated. Got them used along with a Glendale CRS plate. I wasn't looking for that in particular, just stumbled into them at a good price while shopping around for used parts.

    They sound good. The e/a doesn't sound particularly different from the rest. They've never been off the guitar, so I have no comparison to offer you.
     
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  16. Mat

    Mat Tele-Meister

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    Hey PeterUK

    Snap!

    my blackguard is 2591 same as my book and my 60’s build is 1964 on the bridge plate (birth year)
     
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  17. DavidP

    DavidP Friend of Leo's

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    Hey Texicaster: I dunno, to quote from MR's webpage for these (emphasis added):
    "Low carbon cold roll steel and nickel plated, machined to original “Broadcaster” specifications. Nickel plated steel slotted head adjusting screw and spring; nickel plated steel slotted set screws at the correct angle. There is only one difference between this set and the originals: they are compensated…. discretely. Cut to vintage 2 1/8'' string spacing."

    Now, I've never seen an original Broadcaster to compare (anyone got some pics??), but seriously doubt MR would get something like this wrong... I too wondered about the angle of attack of these screws on
     
  18. Texicaster

    Texicaster Tele-Afflicted

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    Well I don't recall is mine are Broadcaster but looking at the photo above the adjusting screws are also slanted instead of vertical and ~90° to the bridge.

    I've not owned a Broadcaster so can't say if vertical or slanted. IF slanted the Rutters are more like that.

    Callaham are stainless steel so not vintage spec'd but my Tele isn't vintage to begin with... I've had them both on the same Telecaster and frankly couldn't discern one better or another.....

    But I always end up with the Callahams on #1
     
  19. gmann

    gmann Friend of Leo's

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    I've got the cold rolled Broadcaster saddles on my Blackguare Esquire clone. I love 'em. And yes, that angle is correct. I had a real '56 Esquire and that were angled like that as well. I have a '59 Custom Shop top loader Esquire on it's way to me as I type this, I've already ordered the saddles fm Marc. Can you tell I like Esquires?
     
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  20. EsquireOK

    EsquireOK Friend of Leo's

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    Back angled screw holes are better, IME. When you are using heavier strings, as Teles were designed around, your saddles often end up over the bridge mounting screws. The back angled screws put the bottoms of the screws on a level surface. I wish I had proper back angled screws on my Teles, because many of them fall right over bridge mounting screws. This means that when you are adjusting intonation, the saddle angle you have set changes, and has to be reset with each tweak of an intonation screw.

    "More contact" with straighter screw holes is not only negligible, but entirely meaningless, even in theory. What the hell is "more contact" supposed to actually do one way or the other? The only thing the screws need to do is set the saddle height. The idea that they have a positive tonal effect because they are hitting the bridge at a right angle, vs. a sharper angle, is ludicrous.
     
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